Out2News Traffic & Travel

Mapp Road Town Center Project

FDOT Treasure Coast Traffic Report July 16 through July 23, 2021

19 Aug FDOT Logo

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS MARTIN COUNTY

1. I-95 Lighting and Roadway Improvements Project from South of the State Road 706 / Indiantown Road Interchange to the County Road 708 / SE Bridge Road Interchange
Description: This 11.59-mile I-95 improvements project started September 9, 2020 in Jupiter and Hobe Sound. Work includes installing new roadway lighting with LED luminaires, replacing the high mast lighting system with a conventional LED roadway lighting system, extending the northbound I-95 merge lane just north of Indiantown Road, extending the deceleration distances for the I-95 northbound to westbound Indiantown Road exit ramp and the I-95 southbound to eastbound Indiantown Road exit ramp, and installing wrong way vehicle detection systems at the Indiantown Road and SE Bridge Road I-95 interchanges and new advanced warning signage.
Cost/Completion: $12.3 million. Completion is expected in spring 2022.
Traffic Impact:
• The shoulder in both directions of I-95 will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Aug. 2021 for temporary asphalt placement, landscaping relocation efforts, and conduit and light pole foundation installations.
• One lane in either direction of I-95 at the Indiantown Road interchange may be closed Sunday through Thursday night from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. for roadway work.
• The outside ramp lane of the northbound I-95 to eastbound Indiantown Road exit ramp will be closed Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to install light pole foundations. During this time the exit ramp will still be open as motorists can use the inside left lane.
• One lane in each direction of Indiantown Road from the Turnpike entrance/exit to Island Way will be closed Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to install light pole foundations. During this time, shoulder closures along I-95 ramps to and from Indiantown Road may occur.
• Full Closure: The eastbound Indiantown Road to southbound I-95 on ramp will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Aug. 13, 2021 for concrete pours. Advance notice and detour signage will be in place. Motorists heading east on Indiantown Road to southbound I-95 should continue east on Indiantown Road to Island Way, make a U-turn at Island Way, and head west on Indiantown Road to merge onto the westbound Indiantown Road to southbound I-95 on ramp. For more information, please contact Interim Community Outreach Specialist Melissa Readling at 772-359-5118.

2. State Road 714/SW Martin Highway Widening Project
Description: This 1.127-mile widening project is anticipated to begin on Aug. 2, 2021. Project improvements include widening SR 714/SW Martin Highway from a two-lane undivided rural roadway to a four-lane divided urban roadway, widening the bridge over Florida’s Turnpike, constructing seven-foot buffered bike lanes and six-foot sidewalks on both sides of the roadway, and installing signing, signalization, and lighting upgrades.
Cost/Completion: $21.3 million. Completion is expected in fall 2024.
Virtual Public Meeting & In-person Open House: A Virtual Public Meeting and In-Person Construction Open House will be held on Thursday, July 29, 2021.
• The Virtual Public Meeting will be held from 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. via GoToWebinar. Please use the following link to register: http://bit.ly/SR714widening, or dial (631) 992-3221, Access Code: 760-208-101, to join the meeting. A brief presentation followed by question and comments will be held from 5:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., and again from 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Please note, questions and comments may be submitted via the online chat for the project team to address directly.
• The In-person Open House will be held from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. at the Peter & Julie Cummings Library located at 2551 SW Matheson Avenue, Palm City, FL 34990. This meeting will have an informal open house format, with project representatives available to answer questions and address comments at any time during the meeting. For more information, please contact Interim Community Outreach Specialist Melissa Readling at 772-359-5118.
*** See attached project flyer

3. Warfield Boulevard from Allapattah Road to Jackson Avenue in Indiantown
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Warfield Boulevard will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday through Thursday night from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

4. Warfield Boulevard from Fox Brown Road to Springhaven Avenue in Indiantown
Traffic Impact:
• The northbound lane of Warfield Boulevard will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

5. Kanner Highway from Warfield Boulevard to Lake Point Circle in Port Mayaca
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Kanner Highway will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

6. U.S. 1 from SE Highborne Way to just South of SE Dixie Highway in Hobe Sound
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of U.S. 1 will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 27 for fiber optic cable and mast arm installation. For more information, please contact Donald Altaffer at 772-281-2232.

7. U.S. 1 from Ocean Boulevard to Joan Jefferson Way in Stuart
Traffic Impact:
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Jul. 23 for paving. For more information, please contact Nate Westall at 772-284-1973.

8. Martin Downs Boulevard from Reilley Avenue to Conch Cove Lane in Palm City
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Martin Downs Boulevard will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

9. Kanner Highway from Lost River Road to Cove Road in Stuart
Traffic Impact:
• One northbound lane of Kanner Highway will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

10. Kanner Highway from S. Manor Drive to U.S. 1 in Stuart
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of Kanner Highway will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

11. U.S. 1 from Wright Boulevard to Baker Road in Stuart
Traffic Impact:
• One northbound lane of U.S. 1 from Wright Boulevard to Baker Road will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. through Aug. 6 for median work with sod, concrete pouring, irrigation installation and landscaping. For more information, please contact Michael Forman at 772-794-4100.

12. U.S. 1 from Monterey Road to Glenwood Drive in Stuart
Traffic Impact:
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

13. Jensen Beach Causeway Bridge from Indian River Drive to State Road A1A in Jensen Beach
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of the Jensen Beach Causeway Bridge will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

14. U.S. 1 from North of SE Fischer Street in Stuart to Jensen Beach Boulevard in Jensen Beach
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of U.S. 1 will undergo a rolling lane closure Monday, July 26 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. for road deflection testing. For more information, please contact Walter Adamcewicz at 732-484-1372

15. U.S. 1 from just south of Lennard Road to SE Port St. Lucie Boulevard in Port St. Lucie
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of U.S. 1 will undergo a rolling lane closure Monday, July 26 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. for road deflection testing. For more information, please contact Walter Adamcewicz at 732-484-1372

16. Port St. Lucie Boulevard from west of SE Shelter Drive to U.S. 1 in Port St. Lucie
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Port St. Lucie Boulevard will undergo a rolling lane closure Monday, July 26 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. for road deflection testing. For more information, please contact Walter Adamcewicz at 732-484-1372

17. Southbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 Exit Ramp to Martin Highway/SR 714 (Exit 133)
Traffic Impact:
• Full Closure: Southbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 exit ramp to Martin Highway/SR 714 (Exit 133) will undergo an overnight full ramp closure, 10 p.m. Sunday, July 25, to 6 a.m. Monday, July 26. If necessary, this closure may also occur nightly from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., Monday, July 26, and Tuesday, July 27. Detour information is as follows:
o Southbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 traffic wishing to access SW Martin Highway/SR 714/Stuart (Exit 133) will be directed to exit at Becker Road (Exit 138), travel west on Becker Road to Port St. Lucie Boulevard/Citrus Boulevard, and travel south on Citrus Boulevard to access SW Martin Highway. For more information, please contact Fiorella Teodista at 954-663-0612.

ST. LUCIE COUNTY

18. Midway Road Widening Project, from S. 25th Street to U.S. 1
Description: This 1.8-mile project includes: reconstructing the existing two-lane Midway Road to a four-lane, divided highway with a raised median; installing a new signal at Sunrise Boulevard; constructing a new bridge over the North Fork St. Lucie River; constructing a 6-foot sidewalk on the north side and a 12-foot multi-purpose trail on the south side Midway Road; constructing 4-foot bike lanes on both sides of the roadway; reconstruction of S. 25th Street approximately 1000’ to the south & north of Midway Road; reconstruction of Sunrise Boulevard from W. 1st Street to Charlotta Street; reconstruction of Oleander Avenue from W. 2nd Street to Merritt’s Ditch; drainage improvements, including constructing 6 retention ponds at 5 locations; and signage, signalization, and lighting improvements.
Cost/Completion: $26.8 million. Completion is expected in fall 2021.
Traffic Impact:
• Nighttime lane closures will occur along the project Tuesday through Friday from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. for paving at the following locations:
 One lane in either direction of U.S. 1 at Midway Road
 One lane in either direction of Midway Road between U.S. 1 and 2nd Street
 One eastbound lane of Midway Road between Jorgensen Road and 25th Street
 One lane in each direction of 25th Street from River Hammock Lane to Divine Road
Turning lanes may be intermittently closed, and motorists will still be able to make the turn using the through lane. While paving through the intersections, short-term intermittent closures may occur, and motorists will be temporarily diverted to side streets.
• Nighttime lane closure will occur along the project Tuesday through Friday from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m. for paving at the following locations:
o One lane in either direction of Sunrise Boulevard between Midway Road and just north of Charlotta Street
o One lane in either direction of Oleander Avenue between West 2nd Street and Midway Road
Two-way traffic will be maintained with a flag crew. Turning lanes may be intermittently closed, and motorists will still be able to make the turn using the through lane. While paving through the intersection, short-term intermittent closures may occur, and motorists will be temporarily diverted to side streets.
• Northbound and southbound traffic on Sunrise Boulevard from 1st Street to Charlotta Street is shifted to the west on the newly constructed roadway to facilitate roadway construction to the east. For more information, please contact Interim Community Outreach Specialist Melissa Readling at 772-359-5118.

19. “Jobs Express Terminal” Gatlin Boulevard Park and Ride Lot Project
Description: The “Jobs Express Terminal” Gatlin Boulevard park and ride lot project started August 23, 2020. The future location of this park and ride lot is just east of the I-95 interchange, between Brescia Street and Edgarce Street. The purpose of the project is to support regional commuter trips to and from the greater St. Lucie County area by constructing a park and ride lot with the capacity to hold 162 vehicles and installing bus shelters for drop-off or pick-up.
Cost/Completion: $2 million. Completion is expected in summer 2021.
Traffic Impact:
• One eastbound lane of Gatlin Boulevard from Brescia Street and Edgarce Street will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Jul. 2021 for construction of a permanent driveway.
• One northbound lane of Brescia Street just south of Gatlin Boulevard may be closed Sunday through Thursday night from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Jul. 2021 for driveway turnout construction. During this time, pedestrian traffic may be detoured to the other side of Brescia Street.
• The westbound lane of Hayworth Avenue between The Home Depot and Edgarce Street may be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Jul. 2021 for driveway turnout construction. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Interim Community Outreach Specialist Melissa Readling at 772-359-5118.

20. US 1/State Road 5 and State Road 70 Advanced Transportation Management Center (ATMS) Improvements Design-Build Project
Description: Construction on the U.S. 1/State Road (SR) 5 and SR 70 (Okeechobee Road/Virginia Avenue) ATMS improvements design-build project started September 29, 2020. The improvements to this project include installing closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras and Bluetooth detection devices that will transmit to the Traffic Management Center at the following locations: U.S. 1 from Savanna Club Boulevard to Kings Highway/SR 713, and SR 70 from Kings Highway/SR 713 to U.S. 1.
Cost/Completion: $6.4 million. Completion is expected in fall 2021.
Traffic Impact:
• The northbound and southbound shoulders of U.S. 1 from North 3rd Street to Kings Highway will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Aug. 31 for utility work.
• One northbound lane of U.S. 1 from Orange Avenue to Causeway Drive will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Jul. 30 for conduit and pull box installation. During this time, intermittent sidewalk closures will occur, detouring pedestrians to the nearest signalized intersection.
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 from Avenue C to Avenue M will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for conduit and pull box installation. During this time, intermittent sidewalk closures will occur, detouring pedestrians to the nearest signalized intersection.
• The southbound shoulder of U.S. 1 from Savanna Club Boulevard to Rio Mar Drive will be closed intermittently Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for conduit and pull box installation. During this time, intermittent sidewalk closures will occur, detouring pedestrians to the nearest signalized intersection.
• One northbound lane of U.S. 1 from Rio Mar Drive to Orange Avenue will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for conduit and pull box installation. During this time, intermittent northbound turn lane and sidewalk closures will occur. Pedestrians will be detoured to the nearest signalized intersection.
• One eastbound lane of State Road 70 from South 41st Street to U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for conduit and pull box installation.
• One lane in each direction of State Road 70 from Kings Highway to South 41st Street will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for conduit and pull box installation.
• One lane in each direction of State Road 70 from Kings Highway to South 41st Street will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for conduit and pull box installation.
• The left westbound lane of Okeechobee Road at the State Road 70/Virginia Avenue intersection will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 for traffic controller work. For more information, please contact Interim Community Outreach Specialist Melissa Readling at 772-359-5118.
Utility Work Not Construction Related:
• One lane in each direction of U.S. 1 from Rio Mar Drive to Dennison Drive will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 from Tropical Isle Way to Midway Road will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for paving. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

21. U.S. 1/State Road (SR) 5 Improvement Projects
Description: Construction on the U.S. 1 improvement projects from south of Port St. Lucie Boulevard/SR 716 to Rio Mar Drive and at Virginia Avenue/SR 70 started November 19, 2020. The improvements under this contract consist of milling and resurfacing the existing roadway and restriping to provide 6‐foot buffered bicycle lanes on U.S. 1 from south of SR 716 to Rio Mar Drive, and widening the existing roadway in the NW corner of the U.S. 1 and SR 70 intersection to accommodate a southbound right-turn lane.
Cost/Completion: $7,223,963. Completion is expected in spring 2022.
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of U.S. 1 from Port St. Lucie Boulevard to Rio Mar Drive will be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday through Thursday night from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. for sidewalk repair work. During this time, sections of the sidewalk will be closed. Detour signage will be in place, directing pedestrians to the nearest signalized intersection.
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 at Virginia Avenue will be closed Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. for sidewalk repair work. During this time, sections of the sidewalk will be closed. Detour signage will be in place, directing pedestrians to the nearest signalized intersection. For more information, please contact Interim Community Outreach Specialist Melissa Readling at 772-359-5118.

22. Emerson Avenue from Waterstone Boulevard to 15th Street SW in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• Starting Wednesday, July 28, the northbound lane of Emerson Avenue will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 13 for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Jonah Davis at 352-801-6666.

23. State Road A1A from Jackson Way to Regal Road in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• The northbound lane of State Road A1A will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

24. State Road A1A from Shorewinds Drive to S. Lakeview Circle in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of State Road A1A will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

25. 25th Street from Rosarita Avenue to St. Lucie Boulevard in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of 25th Street will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 20 for maintenance work. For more information, please contact Mario Jacas at 305-803-9504.

26. 25th Street from Avenue P to St. Lucie Boulevard in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of 25th Street will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 20 for maintenance work. For more information, please contact Mario Jacas at 305-803-9504.

27. State Road 713/Turnpike Feeder Road from Indrio Road to Miramar Avenue in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Turnpike Feeder Road will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Rafael Ureña at 772-882-5084.

28. Orange Avenue/SR 68 just east of 33rd Street in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Orange Avenue will undergo a rolling lane closure Tuesday, July 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. for road deflection testing. For more information, please contact Walter Adamcewicz at 732-484-1372

29. Southbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 Exit Ramp to Okeechobee Road/Ft. Pierce/SR 70 (Exit 152)
Traffic Impact:
• Full Closure: Southbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 exit ramp to Okeechobee Road/Ft. Pierce/SR 70 (Exit 152) will undergo an overnight full ramp closure, 10 p.m. Sunday, July 25, to 6 a.m. Monday, July 26, and overnight full ramp closures, 9 p.m. to 6 a.m., Monday, July 26, and nightly through Friday, July 30. Detour information is as follows:
o Southbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 traffic wishing to access Okeechobee Road/SR 70 (Exit 152) will be directed to exit at Port St. Lucie Boulevard (Exit 142), travel north on Bayshore Boulevard to Crosstown Parkway, travel west on Crosstown Parkway to I-95 northbound, and travel north to access Okeechobee Road/SR 70 (Exit 129). For more information, please contact Fiorella Teodista at 954-663-0612.

30. Northbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 between Okeechobee Road/Ft. Pierce/SR 70 (Exit 152) and Yeehaw Junction/SR 60 (Exit 193)
Traffic Impact:
• Full Closure: Northbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 between Okeechobee Road/Ft. Pierce/SR 70 (Exit 152) and Yeehaw Junction/SR 60 (Exit 193) will undergo an overnight full road closure, 10 p.m. Tuesday, July 25, to 5 a.m. Thursday, July 29.
Detour information is as follows:
o Northbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 traffic wishing to continue north will be directed to exit at Okeechobee Road/Ft. Pierce/SR 70 (Exit 152), travel east on Okeechobee Road to I-95, travel north on I-95 to exit at Vero Beach/Lake Wales/SR 60 (Exit 147) and travel west on SR 60 to access northbound Florida’s Turnpike.
o Okeechobee Road/Ft. Pierce/SR 70 traffic wishing to access northbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 will be directed to I-95, travel north on I-95 to exit at Vero Beach/Lake Wales/SR 60 (Exit 147) and travel west on SR 60 to access northbound Florida’s Turnpike.
o During this closure, northbound Florida’s Turnpike/SR 91 traffic will not be able to access the Ft. Drum Service Plaza (milepost 184). The facility’s gas station, convenience store and restaurants will remain open for southbound Florida’s Turnpike traffic. The Port St. Lucie/Fort Pierce Service Plaza (milepost 144) and Canoe Creek (milepost 229) are alternate stops for northbound Florida’s Turnpike drivers. For more information, please contact Fiorella Teodista at 954-663-0612.

21 July FDOT 1
21 July FDOT 2
FDOT Open

CR-A1A (SE Dixie Highway) Lane and Sidewalk Closures

Stuart - On July 6th, J.W Cheatham, on behalf of the Capital Projects Division will begin work on CR-A1A (SE Dixie Highway). This resurfacing work, which includes the addition of marked bicycle lanes, landscaped and lighted medians, and multiple mid-block pedestrian crosswalks, will necessitate intermittent lane and sidewalk closures from SE Jefferson Street to SE Indian Street between 8:30 am and 4:00 pm. This work is anticipated to be complete by December 3rd.

Motorists, pedestrians, and cyclists are encouraged to find detours, exercise caution, and expect minor delays.

The Martin County Road Conditions Map is available via any mobile device or desktop with internet access. To view all county lane/road closures, visit http://conezone.martin.fl.us.

How do you Retire Early?

Out2News Destination of the Month New Port Beach, California

21 Mar Newport Beach

Newport Beach is a coastal city in Orange County, California, United States. Newport Beach is known for good surfing and sandy beaches. Newport Harbor once supported maritime industries, but today, it is used mostly for recreation. Balboa Island draws visitors with a waterfront path and easy access from the ferry to the shops and restaurants. The population of Newport Beach was 85,287 at the 2010 census. The area of Newport Beach, California is beautiful anytime of the year, but if you want to catch the gray whale migration, April is an ideal time to visit. With so many dolphin and whale excursions available from Newport Landing, it is best to visit this area in the spring for the optimal viewing opportunities and before the summer crowds arrive.

There are many beaches to enjoy and boutique shops in the town. You can also enjoy the Balboa Fun Zone that opened in 1936 and still has the wholesome, old-fashioned amusement park thrills, like a Ferris wheel and midway games. Newport Beach has a mid-latitude semi-arid climate (Köppen climate classification BSk) with characteristics of a warm-summer Mediterranean climate (Köppen: Csb). Like many coastal cities in Los Angeles and Orange counties, Newport Beach exhibits weak temperature variation, both diurnally and seasonally, compared to inland cities even a few miles from the ocean. The Pacific Ocean greatly moderates Newport Beach's climate by warming winter temperatures and cooling summer temperatures. Diurnal temperature variation is stronger during the winter than during the summer. Newport Beach does not receive enough precipitation to qualify as a true Mediterranean climate.

Housing prices in Newport Beach ranked eighth highest in the United States in a 2009 survey.Beachgoers have flocked to Newport Beach since the Pacific Electric Railway started bringing them in 1905. Attractions include the city beaches from the Santa Ana River to the tip of the Balboa Peninsula, Corona del Mar State Beach, and the beaches at Crystal Cove State Park. Newport Beach is known for good surfing, especially between Newport Pier and the Santa Ana River. At the tip of the Balboa Peninsula, The Wedge offers world-class bodyboarding and bodysurfing. Newport Pier and Balboa Pier draw fishermen and sightseers. A boardwalk runs 2.9 miles (4.7 km) from 36th Street in West Newport, past Newport Pier and Balboa Pier, to between E and F Streets on the Balboa Peninsula for both pedestrians and bikers.Newport Harbor is the largest recreational boat harbor on the U.S. west coast, and a popular destination for all boating activities, including sailing, fishing, rowing, kayaking, and paddleboarding.

Fashion Island at Newport Center is a regional shopping and entertainment destination.

Pet Travel Tips

Article & Photo by: Tawnya Sessions

Traveling and vacations are fun for the whole family, even your pets.

Pet Friendly Hotels
Before you book your vacation, make sure your preferred hotel allows pets. Most pet friendly hotels state that they allow pets on their websites. If you are not sure, call the hotel before reserving your room to make sure they allow dogs and cats.

Feed Your Pet at Least Two Hours Before Traveling
Whether you are traveling by car, plane or train, lessen the likelihood of motion sickness by feeding your pet at least two hours before you plan to leave for your trip. You should also make sure your pet uses the bathroom before traveling to prevent accidents.

Use Approved Pet Carriers
If you are driving to your destination, make sure your pet is secured in a standard, hard-sided pet carrier and that the pet carrier is secured by a seat belt. If you are flying or traveling by train, purchase a pet carrier that is USDA approved.

Schedule a Wellness Examination with our Veterinarian
If you are uncertain as to whether your pet is healthy enough to fly, go ahead and schedule a checkup with your veterinarian. At the time of your examination, they can administer any extra vaccinations, like kennel cough and Lyme disease, and they can microchip your pet.

Consider Pet Boarding
Sometimes, you are not able to travel with your pet. In these instances, the safest thing you can do is to schedule pet boarding. You can bring your pet's favorite food, toys and bedding to make your pet feel more comfortable.

When is a Good Time to Start Vacation Planning?

20 Oct Cruiseplanners Med Logo

Article by Les Leibowitz - Cruise Planers

A question Carolyn and I often get is “when would be a good time to start planning our vacation”. While there is no “One size fits all” answer to that, we advocate that you start as soon as you begin thinking about it, because the decision has already been made to take a vacation. You’ve probably discussed it with your spouse and children or even family. You might have even floated the idea of traveling with friends. Once you’ve made the decision to go on that long-awaited well-earned vacation, waiting too long might be a set-up for disappointment.

If you enjoy the plush, glamourous experience of vacationing in the Presidential Suite of a five-star hotel, or your family needs a larger living space or adjoining rooms, or you want rooms to be in the same area as friends, then the answer to you would be no it’s not too early to plan a vacation because some destinations may only have a limited amount of those specific accommodations to choose from. Also, early planning often offers better pricing, and incentives. Another great advantage to planning early is that payment is not required in full up front, this way you can take advantage of making payments along the way giving you extra time to save and not having to lay out a large balance at final payment.

With the holiday season approaching, people are still unsure if it’s safe for them to venture out to shop in person. A vacation would be a perfect gift to give this Holiday. You can surprise the family this year by putting a vacation under the tree for next, or even 2022. A vacation could be that much needed “get out of quarantine free” card or the family reunion that makes up for the holiday gatherings, and special celebrations that had to be missed.

Lastly, I couldn’t write any article without a plug for business. I cannot stress enough to you the importance of working with a professional Travel Advisor. Yes, there are absolutely some people with the time, knowledge, and patience to research and plan their own vacation, and they do, but, some of them also make crucial errors that cost them a lot of hard-earned money, and time in the end. Using a professional Travel Advisor can make a world of difference, and that has never been truer with what we saw happen during the Covid-19 pandemic. No one could have predicted how its impact would up end the travel industry and so many people’s vacations the way it did. Travel advisors spent countless hours, and days over the past months securing credits, re-bookings, and refunds for hundreds of thousands of clients. For people that did not use a Travel Advisor, that time spent was very costly for them.

No matter how it is that you’ll be gathering this year, either with family and or with friends, we would like to wish a very happy and healthy Thanksgiving to your family from ours.

Les and Carolyn

15 Auto Loan Terms Explained

20 Sept 27 Travel

You finally found the car of your dreams. But as you discuss financing, your excitement might turn to confusion as you see unfamiliar terms on the contract. Here’s a glossary of auto loan terms to help you better understand the lingo—and get the best deal possible.

Annual Percentage Rate (APR)
The rate of your total cost each year to borrow money. It combines your interest rate plus any fees into one figure that’s expressed as a percentage. The higher the APR, the more you’ll ultimately pay to purchase the car. Learn more about APR.

Credit Report
A statement with information about your credit activity, loan-paying history and the status of your current credit accounts. Your credit report is not the same thing as your credit score. Learn more about your credit score.

Dealer Incentive
A promotion offered by manufacturers to boost sales. Dealers sometimes pass along those savings to buyers.

Dealer Prep Charge
This negotiable charge represents the dealership’s cost to prepare your car for sale after it arrives from the factory.

Dealer Price Sticker (also known as Monroney Sticker)
By law, this sticker on a car’s window must clearly show the car’s base price (the cost without the dealer’s options and fees), the manufacturer’s installed options, the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (the cost with the dealer’s options and fees) and the car’s fuel economy.

Debt-to-Income (DTI) Ratio
A buyer’s monthly debt payments divided by their gross monthly income, expressed as a percentage. The number measures a buyer’s ability to manage monthly auto loan payments.

Destination Charge
The cost of transporting your vehicle to the dealership from the factory or port of entry. This delivery fee is listed on the Dealer Price Sticker of every new car.

Documentation (Doc) Fee
The dealership’s cost to prepare and file the sales contract and other documents. A few states limit this fee, but most don’t.

Down Payment
This cash payment, made at the time of purchase, lowers the amount of money you’ll need to borrow.

Finance and Insurance (F&I) Office
After you agree on a purchase price with a car salesperson, you’ll be directed to this department to draw up the sales contract and finalize your financing.

Lien
Created when you take out a loan, this is the lender’s legal right to possession of the vehicle until the loan is repaid. When the loan is paid off, the lien is released.

Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)
Also known as the list price or sticker price, it is the recommended selling price from the manufacturer (but not necessarily what you will pay). It differs from the car’s base price because the MSRP includes dealer options and fees.

Term
The total length of time on your loan.

Loan-to-Value (LTV) Ratio
A percentage that expresses the amount you’ll need to borrow compared to the value of the vehicle.

Trade-In Value
The amount that the dealership will pay for your old vehicle. If you decide to trade your old vehicle in, that value is subtracted from the sales price of the vehicle you want to buy and will reduce the amount of money you’ll need to borrow.

Blue Marlin Cove

Traveling with Pets

20 Sept Pet Travel photo a

Article: Trent Cane

Traveling with pets is a growing trend, but even the most precious pet does not necessarily a good traveler make. Whether or not you bring your pet along for the trip is not so much a question of “can you?” but a question of “should you?”

No one knows your pet better than you, so no one is more qualified to answer that all-important question. If the answer is a resounding yes, keep reading — we’ve compiled a list of tips and resources for all you pet lovers who can’t bear to leave their furry friends behind.Check whether pets are allowed. Many destinations don’t permit easy entrance for pets. Hawaii, for instance, has a quarantine period for dogs and cats of up to 120 days, as Hawaii is free of rabies. However, dogs and cats meeting specific pre-arrival requirements may qualify for a quarantine of five days or less, or even a direct release, at Honolulu International Airport after inspection.Don’t underestimate the cost. Between crates, air and hotel surcharges, toys, extra food, unexpected vet bills away from home, and more, traveling with your pet can add up. Be aware of the costs and allow a little wiggle room in your budget.

Use proper identification. Put a tag on your pet’s collar that includes rabies vaccination information, your name, your address and phone number, and local contact numbers. It could save your pet’s life.

Train your pet. A pet that responds to your commands will save you considerable trouble while on the road. From the airport to the hotel, a pet that is friendly and obedient is the most pleasant traveling companion.Learn about your pet’s health. Knowing a little about your pet’s normal temperature, pulse and respiratory rate, prescription medications, and other health issues can save you time, worry and money on the road. Consult your vet, and make a checklist of these issues.

Bring a pet first-aid kit. A pet thermometer, tweezers, gauze, antibiotic ointments, ear drops and other items available at most stores will work; consult your vet for a complete list.

Buy a crate. A pet crate is not something to skimp on. It should be sturdy and correctly sized for your pet. A crate that is too small will be very uncomfortable; a crate that is too large could allow your pet to be tossed around during handling. If you’re bringing the animal on a plane, be sure to read your airline’s requirements regarding crate size, weight, material and design. Airline-approved crates must have ventilation on the sides (in addition to the door) and have food/water trays that are refillable from the outside in the case of a delay.Most crates come with stickers indicating that an animal is inside. If your pet is house-trained, consider putting a blanket, liner or cushion in the crate for comfort. If she’s not house-trained, a clean carrier floor is best.

Crate train your pet. A long flight or a lonely hotel room should not be the place your pet becomes acquainted with a traveling crate. Buy your crate well before traveling, and work with your pet until he’s familiar and comfortable in the crate. Normal training techniques should work, such as the use of food, praise and other incentives to get your pet used to staying in the crate.

Pet Hotel Tips

Find pet-friendly hotels. Many hotels gladly accept pets, such as Kimpton and La Quinta Inn & Suites. Find a list of additional pet-friendly properties at PetsWelcome.com, BringFido.com, Pet-Friendly-Hotels.net and PetFriendly.ca.

Stay on a lower floor. It’s far easier to get your pet in and out of a hotel without incident if you are on the ground floor — no elevators, stairs or altercations with other guests.

Keep your pet clean. Wipe mud, dirt and water off your pet’s fur before bringing her back into the hotel. If your pet stains the hotel’s carpet or linens, you might have to pay for cleaning or replacement costs.

Keep your pet in a crate. Hotel employees, neighbors and your pet are probably best served by this step. Your pet can relax in familiar surroundings, the room stays clean and you can relax as well. Don’t leave your pet loose and unattended.

Use the “do not disturb” sign. If you do have to leave your pet in your room, put the “do not disturb” sign on the door so hotel employees don’t enter and become frightened — or get accosted — by your pet.

Walk your pet in approved areas. Ask hotel management where they would prefer that you walk your pet.

Consider a vacation rental. If you’re having trouble finding pet-friendly hotels in your destination, consider a vacation rental through a site some owners allow pets.

How to Stay Comfortable on Long Drives

20 July Travel

Article by: Consumer Reports

Long car trips can literally be a pain. But you can remain physically comfortable on long drives with these tips.

Stay alert. Drowsy driving can be fatal. Don’t push yourself to drive late into the night, when you are usually asleep. Switch drivers if you start to fade. If you’re the only driver, get a hotel room.

Pull over every 2 to 3 hours. “Sitting too long is hard on the lower back due to that constant flexed position,” says Lynn Millar, Ph.D., chair of the department of physical therapy at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. It may compress the discs between your vertebrae, potentially leading to pain, numbness, or tingling in the legs. Your neck and hips could get tight, too. Getting out of the car and walking around a bit can help keep you comfortable on long drives.

Stretch your back. On your driving breaks, stand tall and circle your shoulders back five times. Then reach arms overhead and arch back slightly. Hold for 5 seconds, then lower arms and repeat once or twice.

Uncramp your legs. Try this calf and hip-flexor stretch: Stand with feet staggered in a lunge, left knee bent in front and right leg straight behind so that your heel touches the ground. With hands on hips (or holding on to something for balance), clench the right side of your gluteal muscles. Hold for 30 seconds, then switch legs and repeat.

Relax your shoulders. Keeping your chin parallel to the ground, slowly draw your head back as far as you can. You might feel a stretch along your upper spine and shoulders. Repeat six times.

Flex your feet. Trips longer than 4 hours increase your risk of deep vein thrombosis, a clot that forms, usually in the lower leg or thigh, says Mary Cushman, M.D., a spokesperson for the American Heart Association. Stopping to walk around helps. Passengers in the car should do ankle rolls and alternate flexing and pointing their feet one at a time every half hour or so.

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Driving Tips to Help You Increase Gas Mileage

20 June Driving Tips 1

Article Courtesy of AAA

Your car isn’t the only factor that directly impacts how much gasoline you use (and pay for) each year—it’s also how you drive.

Fuel is the second biggest cost of owning a car, according to AAA research. But there are ways to use less. Simply driving sensibly—avoiding rapid acceleration and braking, for example—can save you up to 40 percent on gas in stop-and-go traffic, according to fueleconomy.gov.

Here are driving tips to help you increase gas mileage—which, in return, will save you money at the pump:

Accelerate gradually
Avoid “jackrabbit” starts, but don’t accelerate too slowly.

20 June Driving Tips 2

Pro tip: Drive like there’s an egg on the gas pedal—press evenly and gently on the accelerator to avoid breaking the egg.
Gas mileage usually decreases rapidly at speeds above 50 mph. Reducing highway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by 7 to 14 percent, according to fueleconomy.gov.

Be consistent
Tests have shown that using cruise control when driving on level highway roads can save gas. That’s because maintaining a constant speed requires less accelerating and braking. Just remember to avoid using cruise control on wet or slippery roads.
Estimate how much gas your vehicle will use on a road trip with the AAA Gas Cost Calculator.

Lose unnecessary vehicle weight
Every pound of unnecessary stuff in your car reduces fuel economy, and rooftop carriers multiply the effect with additional wind resistance. If you’re not using that bike rack and don’t need that box of old books, leave them at home to increase gas mileage.

Anticipate stops
Stay aware of traffic ahead of you; when you anticipate you’ll need to stop, let your foot off the gas as early as possible (using brakes as necessary to let other motorists know your intentions). Time stoplights to maintain momentum and avoid unnecessary stop and go.

20 June Driving Tips 3

Pro-tip: Using a prepaid pass on toll roads can help avoid stops and increase gas mileage, too.

Avoid excessive idling
Idling can use a quarter to a half gallon of fuel per hour, depending on engine size and whether you’re using the air conditioner, according to fueleconomy.gov. Avoid long warm-ups in the morning, and when safe to do so, shut off your engine if you’ll be stopped for more than a minute.

Combine errands into one trip
Getting more things done in one outing can help increase gas mileage. Also consider what time you’re heading out—avoiding stop-and-go rush hour traffic can save you time and money.

Bonus tip: Give your car some TLC

These don’t involve driving, but good habits in maintaining your car can help increase gas mileage. Reduce fuel economy by maintaining recommended tire pressure, keeping the air filter clean and replacing exhaust oxygen sensors before they fail.

There Are So Many Benefits of Traveling?!

tRAVEL PHOTO

Article by: Pete R.

Everyone keeps saying how important it is to travel. So what's all this fuss about?

The benefits of traveling are not just a one-time thing: traveling changes you physically and psychologically. Having little time or money isn't a valid excuse. You can fly for cheap very easily. If you have a full-time job and a family, you can still travel on the weekends or holidays, even with a baby.

Here are some of the main benefits of traveling. And I'm sure that once you get started, you'll find some more yourself!

Traveling Improves Your Health
Traveling Disconnects You From Your Daily Life
Traveling Makes You Smarter
Traveling Improves Your Understanding of Other Cultures
Traveling Makes You More Interesting
Traveling Allows You to Try Amazing Food
Traveling Makes You Feel Like An Adventurer
Traveling Expands Your (Real) Social Network
Traveling Creates Lifetime Memories
Traveling Makes You Love Your Home Even More

Final Words On the Benefits of Traveling

Traveling Doesn't Make You Feel (As) Bad For Spending Money

There is (yet) another one by Mark Twain: “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do.” Cliché as this may sound, the money you spend on travel, is an investment in yourself. Travel doesn't make you feel as bad for spending money.

And one last benefit of traveling: it might provide some money when your flight is disrupted!