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OUT2NEWS PET OF THE WEEK!!

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“Johnny”

Do you want YOUR pet to be Out2News Pet of the Week?

Send us your Photos with name of your pet to rhallout2news@gmail.com

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OUT2NEWS DECEMBER BARK BYTE

HOLIDAY SAFETY TIPS

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Article by: Robin Hall – Out2News/Out2martincounty.com

The holiday season is upon us, and many pet parents plan to include their furry companions in the festivities. As you gear up for the holidays, it is important to try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. Also, please be sure to steer pets clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations.

Be Careful with Seasonal Plants and Decorations

Oh, Christmas Tree: Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria, and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.
Avoid Mistletoe & Holly: Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested. Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.
Tinsel-less Town: Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.
That Holiday Glow: Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!
Wired Up: Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth and digestive tract.

Avoid Holiday Food Dangers

Skip the Sweets: By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising pet will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.
Leave the Leftovers: Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.
Careful with Cocktails: If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.
Selecting Special Treats: Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible. Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer.

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CASE OF THE MONTH
Heat Stroke
This month we had a sad case of a Bulldog with heat stroke caused while travelling in a car during the Thanksgiving holiday. The pet had been in the car for 2 hours with the owners while travelling back from Thanksgiving. Owners reported that the dog had been panting a lot and didn’t seem right. On presentation, the pet came was unresponsive and had a temperature over 105 degrees. It was clear that the pet was in Heat Stroke / Exhaustion (Hyperthermia). Unfortunately the dog passed away, despite all our efforts. This is an important reminder for us to keep a close eye on our pets at any time when they are in the car. Even during cooler weather, heat stroke can occur suddenly, especially when in a car due to the sun in Florida.

Dog fur is a great insulator against the cold, but can often be problematic in hot weather. This is because dogs, unlike humans, eliminate heat by panting, not sweating. Dogs have some sweat glands in the footpads which help with heat dissipation, but only minimally. When heat cannot be dissipated by panting, their internal body temperature rises, and can be fatal if not corrected quickly.

Excessive panting and signs of discomfort indicate overheating. It is important to be aware of the ambient temperature of your vehicle and take appropriate preventative measures to prevent overheating. Dogs with thick fur, short noses, or those suffering from medical conditions, such as laryngeal paralysis and obesity, are predisposed to heatstroke. In addition, dogs that enjoy constant exercise and playtime — such as working dogs (Labradors, Springer Spaniels, etc.) — should be closely monitored for signs of overheating, especially on hot days.
If you notice signs that your pet was to overheating at home, here are some steps to follow:
• Move your pet to a cooler area. This may be shade, an air conditioned area, or in front of a fan.
• Wet your pet using cool water, not cold. If water is to cold it will constrict the blood vessels and impede cooling.
• Place cool wet cloth on feet and around head.
• Offer ice cubes for the animal to lick.
• Contact your veterinarian immediately – as this can be fatal!

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Cats and Christmas Trees—How to Avoid Disaster!

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Article By: Shannon Borrego

If you have a Christmas tree and you have a cat, chances are, you also have stories to tell! Bringing a tree indoors and covering it with shiny, glittery ornaments is asking for trouble from your feline family members. If you have any doubt, just check out the videos on You Tube of cats climbing Christmas trees, knocking carefully decorated trees down, sleeping in the branches and destroying decorations.

Is the only solution to the cat vs. Christmas tree problem to forego your tree? Thankfully, no! There are precautions that can be taken to lessen the chances of a mishap. An article, “How to Cat Proof Your Christmas Tree” on the WikiHow site, recommends that you initially put up your tree and leave it undecorated for a day or two. This allows your cat to get used to the presence of the tree without the added allure of decorations.

Once you do start decorating, place the unbreakable ornaments closer to the bottom and the more fragile items higher up on the tree. Avoid ornaments with bits of ribbon or loose parts that your cat could choke on or swallow.

If your cat can’t seem to resist attacking the tree or helping himself to the ornaments, try using a cat repellent spray, a citrus spray, or, even mint toothpaste rubbed on the branches and baubles. Be aware that these repellents will probably need to be re-applied periodically as the scent fades over time.

Pet MD weighs in on cat-proofing your Christmas tree in an article, “Can Cats and Christmas Trees Co-Exist?” The article recommends taking the extra step of increasing a tree’s stability to lessen the likelihood of disaster. This can be done by tethering the tree to a wall or the ceiling with fishing line.

With any luck, your cats may lose interest in the Christmas tree over time, and wander off to greener pastures. My cats always enthusiastically join me for the decorating process, but quickly find the tree boring once the decorating is finished. Of course, I’m still careful not to place any of my cherished or breakable decorations within paw’s reach. After all, is cat is a cat, and a decorated tree can be tempting, even for the most well-behaved feline!

 

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New Techniques Developed for Matching People and Cats

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Article by Shannon Borrego

Imagine a system that matches cats up with people based on compatibility—sort of a human/feline match.com. Welcome to Feline-ality, the system uses color coding to assess the personalities of both cats and potential adopters and combines the two for in a match made in heaven! Or, if not made in heaven, at least one with a high rate of success!

How, exactly, does Feline-ality work? According to author Nadia Archuleta in her article, “Cat Personalities: Feline-ality and Meet Your Match”, the system color codes cats into three categories: green cats are adventurous and self-sufficient; orange cats are extremely companionable; and purple cats may be shy and in need of a patient owner.

Potential adopters first fill out a questionnaire that assesses their needs and expectations from a feline companion. Their answers are given the same color codes as those assigned to the cats. The results are tabulated and compatible people and cats brought together for a meet-and-greet. Amazingly, the Feline-ality system has been shown to reduce returns by 40% in some shelters.

Feline-ality isn’t the only system to categorize cats according to personality type. Dr. Laura Finka, a research fellow at the University of Lincoln, studied more than 200 cats and concluded that there are five feline personality types. In an article about her research on the daily mail.uk website, the personality types were as follows:

The Human Cat–a very sociable cat that tends to cuddle, head-butt, and knead its owner with his paws.

The Hunter Cat—a cat with a strong hunting drive characterized by such behavior as clasping a realistic cat toy in his teeth and kicking it frantically.

The Cat’s Cat—one characterized by positive relationships with other cats. He is a good choice for multi-cat households in which the owners are often gone during the day.

The Cantankerous Cat—As its name suggests, a cat who is fairly independent. More effort is required to ensure he is comfortable with his humans, and he enjoys “alone” time.

The Inquisitive Cat—a feline that exhibits an eagerness to explore and investigate anything and anyone unfamiliar. He does well in a home with lots of people coming and going.

Whether you opt to choose your feline companion through matching techniques, or simply through a meet-and-greet, you, too can find your perfect match. Check out Caring Fields Felines to find your soulmate! www.cffelines.org

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Paradise Pooch Pet Services

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Lisa takes good care of me at Paradise Pooch!

Paradise Pooch does lots of things, she does dog grooming,walking and pet sitting,equine care and she is licensed and insured.

Some of the added conveniences of mobile grooming over a traditional salon include:

You avoid taking time from your busy schedule to drop off and pick up your pet(s)…We come to You!
Your pet avoids the stress of traveling in the car and being left in a strange environment.
You and your pet receive the full one-on-one attention from a professional pet stylist.
Your pet is never confined in a cage or kennel.

Book your pet for a holiday pampering with Lisa at Paradise Pooch – 508-237-1601.

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OUT2NEWS NOVEMBER BARK BYTE

TIPS TO KEEP YOUR PET HEALTHY AND SAFE DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON

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Article by: Robin Hall – Out2News

November is in full swing and with that means many things. For most people, the holiday season will soon be starting. Whether it be Thanksgiving or Christmas, there’s a good chance families and friends will be visiting and pets will be in the mix too.

Here are a few steps to keep your pet health and safe during the upcoming season.

Holiday Obstacles

In most cases, food will be prepared and many new decorations will hit the home during the next couple of months. Keep foods such as chocolate and other items that may be alarming to pets out of reach. If you are making homemade items with scents and perfumes, then keep them sealed an protect as well. And most of all, when decorating make sure items that cats or dogs could choke on are out of sight.

Also take deep consideration with costumes and holiday themed accessories. If your dog normally wears a collar, it is fine to switch it with a holiday collar as this would still be commonplace, but use caution with other costumes and fitted clothes. Some may have items that could be choking hazards or other

Travel

Numerous people travel with pets each year. While you want to be comfortable while traveling, its is the same thought that pets want the same requirements. Pack their toys, bowls, medication and other items you would have around the house. New territory can be unfamiliar and they should have the less stress as possible.

It is also good to know if your pet is equipped for travel. In some cases, it may be better for the pet to stay at home or find another source of dog and cat lodging.

Health and Medical Conditions

There is no doubt that pet owners will be busy, but that doesn’t mean they should skip regular appointments for their pet. Annual vaccinations, spay and neuter services and heartworm testing should all be enacted during this time. It should be business as usual and pets shouldn’t take a backseat to the chaos of the season.

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This low resolution photo is NOT copy write protected. If you wish a copy simply right/click on the photo and hit “copy” or “save image as”. If you wish a high resolution file contact: rshall@out2martincounty.com

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WHAT IS A PET TRUST?

Out2News.comA pet trust is an arrangement to provide for the care and financial support of your pet(s) upon your disability or death. You fund the trust with property or cash that can be used to provide for your pet based on your instructions in the trust document.

Your pet trust should name a trustee who will carry out your instructions for the care of your pet, including handling and disbursement of trust funds and turning your pet over to the person or entity you designate to serve as your pet’s caregiver. The trustee and caregiver could be the same person or entity.

As with most trusts, you can create your pet trust while you’re alive (an inter vivos or living trust) or at your death through your will (a testamentary trust). In either case, you can generally change the terms of your pet trust at any time during your lifetime to accommodate changing circumstances. If you create an inter vivos trust, you can fund it with cash or property either during your life (needed if the trust is to care for your pet if you become incapacitated) or at your death through your will. A testamentary trust is only funded after you die.

Some of the instructions to consider for your pet trust include: provisions for food and diet, daily routines, toys, medical care and grooming, how the trustee or caregiver is to document expenditures for reimbursement, whether the trust will insure the caregiver for any injuries or claims caused by your pet, and the disposition of your pet’s remains.

You may also want to name a person or organization to take your pet should your trust run out of funds. Also consider naming a remainder beneficiary to receive any funds or property remaining in the trust after your pet dies.

A potential problem arises if your pet is expected to live for more than 21 years after your death. That’s because, in many states, the “rule against perpetuities” forbids a trust from lasting beyond a certain period of time, usually 21 years after the death of an identified person. However, almost every state has laws relating to pet trusts that address this issue in particular and allow for the continued maintenance of the trust, even if its terms would otherwise violate the rule.

Note that there are costs and expenses associated with the creation of a trust.

If you’re looking for an advisor who can assist you in this time of change, give me a call.

Steven W Landwersiek is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC

6530 S. Kanner Hwy | Stuart, FL, 34997-6396

Office: 772.233.4315 | Fax: 772.233.4316

steve@laaipg.com / Steven.landwersiek@lpl.com

http://www.laaipg.com/

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Hunting Instinct in Cats Can be Re-directed

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Article by: Shannon Borrego – Caring Felines

Why do cats hunt prey even when they aren’t hungry? To humans the practice may seem cruel, but cats are just following their instincts. Cat’s hunting behavior is explained in an article, “Understanding Your Cat’s Predatory Behavior” on the Perfect Paws website. The article states, “Cats are born with a hunting and chasing instinct. But they are not necessarily born hunters that kill for food. Killing and eating prey are generally learned behaviors.”

You may have seen kittens pouncing on anything that moves as part of their play. This behavior is Mother Nature’s way of preparing the kittens to catch prey later in life. The killing process is taught by the mother cat who begins by bringing home dead prey and progresses to the stage where the kittens are given the task of “finishing off” an animal she has brought home.

While this skill is vital for an animal’s survival in the wild, it is detrimental to both cats and wildlife in a domestic setting. Animal behaviorist, Marilyn Krieger, explains the dangers in her article, “How to Exercise Your Cat’s Predator Instinct Without Letting her Hunt.” In addition to harming the populations of song birds and other animals, Ms. Krieger warns that when ingesting wild prey, cats can also ingest parasites, pathogens, or even second-hand poisons previously consumed by the prey. Furthermore, if the prey fights back, cats can be bitten or scratched as the desperate animal fights for its life.

The best solution to avoiding these dangers is to keep your cat indoors. Ms. Krieger suggests satisfying your cat’s need to hunt by offering games and exercises. Playing with your cat not only gives the cat stimulation, it also helps him keep trim and fit. Try tossing a toy or dangling an object on the end of a stick near your cat. Just be sure to let him “win” some of the time, so he doesn’t become too frustrated.

Treasure hunts are another popular game in which treats are hidden in strategic locations around the house. The game can be customized according to the abilities and personality of your cat.

Although hunting is an instinct, keeping your cat indoors, and providing play activities instead, satisfy his need to hunt while keeping him and his intended prey safe.

www.cffelines.org

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Paradise Pooch Pet Services Opens New Location In Stuart

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Stuart — Your pooch will be the talk of the dog park. At Paradise Pooch Lisa knows that your pets are special member of the family and your best friends. Your pet will be pampered and treated with love and care.

Paradise Pooch brings professional state of the art grooming services to your home. This is a mobile pet grooming salon and pet care company. Lisa comes with a lifetime of experience raising her own pets as well as caring for others.

Paradise Pooch mobile grooming van is climate controled for your pets comfort at all times.The van is fully equipped with a full size tub and hydrolic table. We will accommodate your schedule and come to your home or your office.

Going away or just taking a day trip? Our pet sitting and dog walking services are customized to meet your pets needs. We make visits to your home and take care of all your pets needs while you are away.

Meet Lisa on her website at paradisepoochpetservices.com or FaceBook page for more details.

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Do you have something to say, an event to talk about? An event you would like to have covered? Do it here!

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Out2 Doggie Recipes

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Easy Homemade Raw Dog Food

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Flaxseed Dog Biscuits

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Peanut Butter and Banana Frozen Dog Treats

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If Your Dog Could Talk, He’d Say “Don’t Pet Me Here”

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Article By Dr. Becker

There’s been a great deal of scientific research in recent years into the ways in which dogs benefit people. And the science confirms what pet guardians have always known — our animal companions have a powerful positive impact on our emotional and physical well-being.

Owners who are closely bonded to their dogs spend a lot of time being affectionate with their pet because it feels good. As it turns out, there’s a good reason for those good feelings.
Feel-Good Hormones Overflow in Closely Bonded Dogs and Humans

In a Swedish study, researchers found that owners who kissed their dogs frequently had higher levels of oxytocin than other owners. And along with kissing, there were two other very important factors that contributed to elevated levels of oxytocin:1

The owners perceived their relationship with their dog to be pleasurable rather than difficult or a chore
They offered fewer treats to their pet, preferring to offer attention and affection instead

In another study, dog guardians were put in a sparsely furnished room and asked to sit on a rug on the floor with their pets.2

For a half hour, the owners were instructed to focus all their attention on their dogs — talk softly to them, stroke, scratch and pet them. The owners’ blood was drawn at the beginning and again at the end of the 30-minute session.

The researchers found that the dog owners’ blood pressure decreased, and they showed elevated levels not only of oxytocin, but also several other hormones, including:

Beta-endorphins, which are associated with both pain relief and euphoria
Prolactin, which promotes bonding between parent and child
Phenylethylamine, which is increased in people involved in romantic relationships
Dopamine, which heightens feelings of pleasure

And believe it or not, all the same hormones were also elevated in the dogs, which suggests the feelings of attachment are mutual!

Based on all the happy hormones surging through the dogs, it’s clear the owners in the second study knew how to touch their pets in a way that maximized their pleasure and contentment. However, that’s not always the case.
Have You Ever Wondered How Petting Feels to Your Dog?

Dog-to-dog interaction involves lots of physical contact. They do it to show affection and a desire for play, but they also make contact when trying to goad or threaten another dog.

This is why some forms of human petting elicit pleasure and a sense of calm in dogs, while other types of touching can send the wrong message.

Unless you’re carefully observing her as you pet her, it’s easy to inadvertently trigger negative emotions in your dog. Different types of petting, for example, a scratch behind the dog’s ear or a pat on the head, feel pretty much the same to us. The dog, however, isn’t necessarily having the same experience.

Recently, a team of researchers set out to evaluate the physiological and behavioral responses in dogs to determine which types of petting felt good to them, and which didn’t.3
How the Study Was Conducted

The study involved 28 privately owned dogs of different breeds, ages, and backgrounds. Some dogs were obedience trained; others were not.

Each dog was fitted with a heart rate monitor and brought into a room where both the owner and a stranger were present. The owner was instructed to ignore what was going on while the stranger interacted with the dog, touching him or her in nine different ways for 30 seconds at a time.

The nine different touches included:

Petting the shoulder
Petting the lateral side of the chest
Petting the ventral part of the neck
Petting and holding the lying dog on the ground
Holding a forepaw
Petting on the top of the head
Scratching at the base of the tail
Holding the collar
Covering the muzzle with one hand

What the Strokes Evoked

When the dogs were petted on the head or paw, they showed appeasement signals and redirected behaviors. The researchers interpreted those reactions as signs the dogs were uncomfortable. It’s worth noting that appeasement signals aren’t always indicators of stress. According to Whole Dog Journal:

“They are important everyday communication tools for keeping peace in social hierarchies, and are often presented in calm, stress-free interactions. They are offered in a social interaction to promote the tranquility of the group and the safety of the group’s members.

When offered in conjunction with other behaviors, they can be an indicator of stress as well.”4

When the dogs were constrained by being held while lying on the ground, held by the collar, or having their muzzle covered, unsurprisingly, they showed freezing and displacement behaviors. These included lifting a paw, looking or moving away, and lip licking. All the dogs also had elevated heart rates — a clear sign of stress.

When the interactions were over, the dogs immediately shook their bodies and stretched, which are signs of relief and further proof they did not enjoy being constrained, no matter how gentle the touch. The touches the dogs liked best? Having their chests and shoulders petted, and getting a nice scratch at the end of the spine just in front of the tail.
Dog Petting Tips

It’s important to note the dogs in the study were being handled by strangers. Most dogs tolerate a lot more from their immediate human family members, including touching that is decidedly unnatural for canines, such as hugging and kissing.

However, it’s not uncommon for dog guardians to miss their own dogs’ stress signals, which can include a quick head turn or lick of the upper lip, as well as freezing in place. It can be easy to miss or misinterpret some of the more subtle canine expressions of distress.

Unfortunately, the result can be a difficult relationship between human and dog that in a worst-case scenario can even become dangerous. Suggestions for enhancing your relationship with your dog through touch:

Let your dog initiate contact most of the time, rather than invading his personal space. Some dogs need a little time to settle themselves before getting physically close enough to be touched.
Pet your dog gently on the chest or behind the ear closest to you (to avoid reaching over her head for the other ear). Always avoid petting that involves reaching over or across your dog.
As a general rule, it’s never a good idea to hug a dog. Some dogs tolerate it, but it’s a form of constraint, which feels threatening to them.
Stop petting your dog after a short time and see if she asks for more, or seems relieved and/or moves away.
Watch for stress signals, including looking away, lip licking, yawning, ears back, “whale eye” (the white of the eye is showing at the corners and/or rim), lifting a paw, tail tucking, freezing, or urination. If your dog is doing one or more of these things, stop touching him and give him some space.
Always ask the dog’s human before interacting with a pet you don’t know.

In all interactions with our animal companions, we should pay attention to the impact we’re having on them. Each dog is an individual, and while one dog may love a vigorous rubdown, another may be completely stressed out by that type of handling.

Additionally, there are some dogs that have anxiety and fear being approached by strangers, in general. There’s an organization trying to promote the identification of these dogs from a distance by using a yellow ribbon on a leash, through The Yellow Dog Project, which I wholeheartedly endorse.

By observing your dog’s reaction to physical contact and following his lead, you can enhance your bond with him and forge a more positive relationship.

Out2martincounty.com is a photo journal featuring people, “Who they are, what they do and where they do it”.

Do you have something to say, an event to talk about? An event you would like to have covered? Do it here!

Email your story or request to: info@out2martincounty.com

Out2martincounty.com adheres to full compliance with C.O.P.P.A. (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998)

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Out2News 2017  Past Pets of the Week!!!!!!!

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In Memorial Pets

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Their friendship was special—a bond worth honoring and sharing with those who understand.

If you would like to post a pet memorial, please send all pictures to: rshall@out2news.com/martincounty. 

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All Pets Go To Heaven

Out2NewsArticle by: Robin Hall – Out2News/Out2martincounty.com

There is a very special place where beloved pets go after they die. This is only a temporary location. But there are trees and grass and lakes, and everything they love. Here they can play and eat and sleep, even better than they did, before they died. Now, there are no aches or worries or dangers of any kind to trouble or threaten them. The only joy missing is their beloved human companion, you.

All health is restored completely, and all injuries are healed. Dogs and cats play with each other like youngsters, and they do not have time to feel lonely for you. They miss you, and with the special wisdom that animals have, they trust that this condition will get better. And they confidently wait as they frolic.

A wonderful day will come for each of them, when in the middle of playing they will suddenly feel something is different. And all their senses will be at the height of excitement and exuberance. They will sniff the air and look off in the distance where they recognize that dearly loved special presence. Then they will call out in elation, and with eyes shining and tail going wild, tear off at a full gallop, almost flying over the green grass.

The bond that we form with animals can be very deep and fulfilling, and the loss of a beloved animal can have an impact on us that is as great, or even greater, than the loss of a family member or friend. This bond is what makes our interactions with animals rich and rewarding, but also what makes the grief process so complicated. The grief can seem to come in waves, may be brought on more intensely by a sight or sound that sparks your memory, and may seem overwhelming at times.

After your pet has died or been lost, it is natural and normal to feel grief and sorrow. The amount of time a person grieves for the loss of their pet may be very different for different people. Although grief is an internal and private response, there are certain stages of grief that most people experience, and not everyone experiences them all or in the same order.Anger and guilt often follow denial.

Your anger may be directed toward people you normally love and respect, including your family, friends or your veterinarian. People coping with death will often say things that they do not really mean, unintentionally hurting those whom they do not mean to hurt.

Depression is a common experience after the death of a special pet. The tears flow, there are knots in your stomach, and you feel drained of all your energy. Day-to-day tasks can seem impossible to perform and you may feel is isolated and alone. Many depressed people will avoid the company of friends and family.

You will come to terms with your feelings. You begin to accept your pet’s death. Resolution has occurred when you can remember your pet and your time with them without feeling the intense grief and emotional pain you previously felt. Acceptance and resolution are normal and do not mean that you no longer feel a sense of loss, just that you have come to terms with the fact that your pet has died. Everyone experiences the stages of grief, grieving is always a very personal process. Allow yourself time to grieve and heal, and be thankful that your life was made that much better by sharing it with your beloved pet.

Memorializing a pet can be a healthy part of the grieving process. A framed photo or a photo album can help remind a pet parent of their pet. Some people keep the ashes of their pets and bury them in a spot favored by their pet. Creating a journal that includes stories about the things your dog did will help you focus on the good times you spent together.   Photographs record those special moments and lock them forever in time. Have a professional portrait painted as a memorial to your dog companion. If you enjoy gardening, plant a tree, perennial, bush or shrub in memory of your dog. Donate to an animal organization in your dog’s name.  Some pet lovers place a brick or stone with their pet’s name painted on it in their gardens or they buy specially designed and inscribed grave markers if their pet is buried on their property.

Realizing that a seemingly trifle, yet possibly most-significant part of pet ownership is doing the right thing for our pets at the end of their lives. Sometimes the hardest things to do are the best things we can do. Loving animals teaches us something about ourselves and so does letting them go…

Out2 Bark Byte is dedicated to Robin Hall’s – Owner of Out2News best friend “Teddy”. RIP 8/4/2015

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