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OUT2NEWS PET OF THE WEEK!!

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“Herbie”

Do you want YOUR pet to be Out2News Pet of the Week?

Send us your Photos with name of your pet to rhallout2news@gmail.com

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OUT2NEWS DECEMBER BARK BYTE

6 Tips to Keep Your Pet Safe this Holiday Season

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Article by: Robin Hall – Out2News/Out2martincounty.com

As you prepare for the holidays, it is important to keep your pet’s health and safety top of mind.

Dangerous decorations: “While a tree is not generally harmful to pets, pine needles can cause eye trauma and holiday decorations can be hazardous to pets. Consider confining your pet’s access to rooms with holiday decorations especially when unsupervised to keep them from chewing or ingesting ornaments, holiday lights, electric wires, and ribbons. One easy option is to use baby gates.

Holiday treats are for people, not pets: “Restrict pet access to holiday snacks and treats like chocolate, coffee, caffeine, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins and any candy or food item containing xylitol which are toxic to pets. Store these items in places pets cannot reach or access. Do not share your food to avoid unnecessary weight gain in your pet. Have healthy snacks on hand to share including green beans, carrots, zucchini or celery.

Guests can be stressful: “Evaluate your pet’s stress levels when hosting guests. Consider boarding pets during the holidays unless boarding is in itself a source of stress. Discuss with your veterinarian using anti-anxiety medications if indicated. Consider confining pets to a safe space, room, or crate while entertaining visitors.

Poisonous plants: “Poinsettias are relatively safe and do not impose a serious hazard to pets but do avoid access to or ingestion of mistletoe and holly. Additionally, some visitors may bring bouquets that contain flowers such as lilies which are toxic to cats.

Routine is key: “Make sure to stick to your pet’s normal routine as much as possible to enjoy a low stress holiday season. Build in time for walks, play, and meals prior to the start of the holiday season.

When to call your veterinarian: “Contact a veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet ingested any dangerous foods, items or if they are not acting right. If traveling, be proactive and find out where and when you can seek veterinary care during the holidays in case you need it.”

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New Holiday Gifts for Cats Offer Fun and Practicality

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Article by: Shannon Borrego

Christmas is almost here and it’s time to check out this year’s crop of new and innovative gifts for your cat! It makes no difference whether your feline family members have been naughty or nice; most devoted cat owners want to include their fur-babies in the holiday festivities. Besides, it’s always entertaining to see what new pet gadgets and gifts are on the market!

Sally Kaplan and Melanie Yates compiled a great list of pet gifts in an article entitled “28 Must-Have Gifts To Spoil Your Pets.” Although some of the suggestions failed to inspire me, others were down-right hilarious. Here are my top four favorites.

First on the list of new offerings is the Feline Facial Massage Roller. I found several different brands available online, ranging in price from around $9.00 to $13.00. The device consists of two soft knobby protrusions that simultaneously knead either side of a cat’s head under the guiding hand of a human. I’m not convinced that it provides a more comfortable experience than simply rubbing the cats face with one’s hands, but it’s certainly more fun.

For those who enjoy the ritual of an evening Happy Hour, why not invite your cat to join you in an aperitif? At only $5.00, Apollo Peak MosCATO is a bargain. The non-alcoholic brew, with notes of catnip, has been created just for cats. It’s sure to please even most discerning feline palate!

Who else but Hammacher Schlemmer would come up with a high-tech version of the laser pointer? This impressive gadget features multiple lasers attached to a scratching post. The lasers fire randomly, sending beams in different directions to keep your cats guessing. For $80.00 you can let Hammacher Schlemmer do the work while you sit back and watch the action.

Lastly, the K & H Thermo Windowsill seat is sure to please even the pickiest cat. The device allows your cat to have a view of the outdoors from the comfort of a cozy indoor perch. The seat comes with a faux lamb’s fleece cover and a removable thermo heater. All this for just $22.00.

These ideas will help get you started with your shopping, and all the above products are available on the bestproducts.com website. Best of luck in your search for the perfect gift for your special feline! When thinking of holiday giving, please keep Caring Fields Felines a mind, too!

www.cffelines.org.

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Photo by: Denise Horvath

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Cats Come to CFF From Variety of Circumstances

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Article by: Shannon Borrego

Caring Fields Felines receives calls almost every day asking the rescue group to take in cats. “Where do all these cats come from?” you may wonder.

Many of the cats brought to CFF are given to us directly from shelters that practice euthanasia; these shelters are trying to place the cats elsewhere to avoid euthanizing them. CFF works closely with a shelter in Okeechobee, and with shelters in Palm Beach County. Recently, CFF volunteers Nan Steinbrecher and Laurie Michaud drove down to West Palm Beach to pick up a cat from animal control.

The beautiful four-year old male cat was on “last call” and his time was running out. He was a gem; not only beautiful, but exceptionally sweet despite having been neglected. After living in a home for three years, the poor fellow still hadn’t been given a name! Nan and Laurie immediately dubbed him Pilgrim, in honor of Thanksgiving and in recognition of the cat’s difficult journey through life.

As Nan and Laurie were finalizing arrangements for Pilgrim, a distraught woman entered the shelter with a handsome male tuxedo cat. Mr. Whiskers, she explained, was a wonderful cat, but she could not keep him. When she turned to face them, the reason was obvious. Her face was covered with blotches and welts—an allergic reaction to the cat that couldn’t be controlled with medication.

Laurie asked if she could hold the cat. Despite the strange surroundings, Mr. Whiskers settled into her lap, purring and kneading. That clinched the deal; not one, but two cats came back to Caring Fields that day. Mr. Whiskers is less than a year old, and both he and Pilgrim will be available for adoption shortly.

Cats come to CFF from other sources, as well. Sometimes litters of kittens that arrive are rescued from outdoor colonies; sometimes owners are unable to care for their cat; and, occasionally, a cat is returned to us by someone who previously adopted it from CFF. We do our best to ensure every cat has found a “forever” home the first time around, but when that isn’t the case, we always take the cat back.

For Caring Fields Felines, the emphasis is on CARING. We strive to help as many homeless cats as we possibly can. And, we’re extremely grateful to all those volunteers, adopters, and donors who help us in our efforts.

www.cffelines.org.

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Photo by: Nan Steinbrecher

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If Looking for Personality Adopt a Senior Cat

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In Photo: Oliver

Article by: Shannon Borrego

When choosing a new cat, do you value looks over personality? Those who do, may come to regret their decision. Not that looks don’t matter, but as the years go by, that handsome face may not make up for the disappointment you suffer if your cat’s temperament isn’t what you’d hoped.

How does one ensure their feline’s personality is all you hoped for? Adopt a senior feline!

Sure, those kittens are pretty irresistible; their antics make you laugh, and they are just so petite and cuddly, you fall instantly in love. However, every kitten grows up, and cats, like people, have distinctive personalities. The temperament of a kitten is often somewhat nebulous. They react to other kittens, play, sleep, and get along with just about everyone. As they grow older, their individual character traits begin to emerge. Some cats love to be held, others don’t. Some are very playful, while others are laid back.

By waiting to adopt until a cat has some life experience, you can trust that what you see is what you get. It’s much easier to identify the qualities you are looking for in an older cat than in a youngster.

A senior cat not only has a well-formed personality, but chances are, he has developed good manners as well. He’s probably an old hand at finding and using the litter box, adapting to the sleep schedule of his owners, and getting along with others.

When you adopt a senior cat, you are performing a true kindness. So often, the kittens get snapped up while the sweet seniors sit quietly by, overlooked and forgotten.

Caring Fields Felines has a wonderful variety of senior cats looking for homes. Oliver, for example, would fit well into almost any home. For most of his life he, and another cat, Annie, lived with a woman who adored them. Sadly, the woman passed away, and both cats ended up at Caring Fields Felines.

Annie was adopted by a woman who, after losing her husband, came to the sanctuary and adopted three feline companions. However, Oliver was left behind. This loving 14-year-old is a big, laid back teddy bear. He’s friendly and gets along with everyone. All he wants for Christmas is a home!

If you’d like to learn more about Oliver, or any CFF cats, check out our website, Facebook page, or call us at 772-463-7386. www.cffelines.org.

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Photo by: Debbie Wegner- Contributing Photographer -Out2News/Out2martincounty.com

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Dogs and Cats Forever, Inc.

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Luminarias Honor Special Feline Friends at Merry Meows

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Article by: Shannon Borrego

The soft glow of candles elevates a setting from being simply attractive to completely enchanting. When each candle also bears a message that acknowledges a beloved pet, the result is truly inspirational. Caring Fields Felines will be adorning its sanctuary path with battery-operated candles placed in decorative bags, known as luminarias, as part of the holiday décor for this year’s Merry Meows event. The event will take place on December 8th. The luminarias will not only enhance the “enchanted forest” theme, but they will serve to remind guests that the event is all about our four-footed friends.

CFF invites you to participate in our Luminarias Program by purchasing a luminaria (or two, or, why not ten?) for just $10.00 apiece. Each luminaria you buy may be dedicated to a pet you wish to acknowledge. A card will be attached with your short message. Through the luminaria, our honored pets will be part of the magic of Merry Meows! To donate online, visit our website, www.cffelines.org, or, go to this link on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rescuecatsofPalmCity.

Inspiration for the program came from volunteer, Laurie Michaud, who attended a function In Rhode Island last summer at which luminarias were used as remembrances. She found the experience to be very meaningful. “Our feline friends touch our lives and they are always in our hearts,” Laurie remarked. She felt bringing luminarias to Merry Meows would offer donors a way to honor their own pets while helping CFF in its work to rescue and provide for homeless and abandoned cats.

Donors may choose messages that acknowledge pets who currently share their lives, or as a memorial for those who have crossed the rainbow bridge. As darkness falls over the sanctuary during Merry Meows, and the candles cast their warm light along the path, guests will surely find the sight uplifting.

The magic of Merry Meows grows with every passing year, and we hope you will join for this fundraising event that benefits Caring Fields and celebrates the important role cats play in our lives.

For more information, please call the sanctuary at 772-463-7386.

 

 

HSTC Pets of the Week

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Wally

Meet Wally – a spunky 1 year old male DSH mix cat up for adoption at our North thrift store in Stuart. Last year, Wally was found all alone and scared as a tiny kitten under someone’s house. When he came to the shelter he was covered in ringworm, had a raw tail, had an upper respiratory infection, and was skin and bones. One of the HSTC staff members then took him home for 3 months to get him well again. After bottle feeding and months of medications and skin treatment he was finally a healthy happy kitten and ready for adoption. Wally was fortunate enough to get adopted to a great home but was recently returned when his owner fell ill and was unable to care for him any longer. He is now looking for another home. Wally gets along great with other cats and children. He is a fun loving guy and is ready to show you what an amazing personality he has. Come meet Wally today at our North thrift store: 1099 NW 21st St, Stuart!

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Desiree

I know what you’re thinking when you first see me, with my bad ear cut. I totally need a new stylist, right? A few weeks ago a professional photographer came here and I sat and posed so nicely while he took glamour shots of me. Of ME, isn’t that crazy? I went from a dog dumped in the dark of night to a shelter celebrity just like that. I wasn’t treated all that well before I came here to the shelter, but I want to let you know that hasn’t changed my sweet spirit. Despite my rough past, I still love people. I’ll watch you eat that juicy steak you just grilled, I’ll watch the squirrels climbing up the tree outside the window, and I’ll always watch your back. So look past the exterior and look into my heart, I keep lots of love there and I want to share it with you. I’m 7 years young so my adoption fee has been sponsored! You can visit me and all of my adoptable HSTC friends online at hstc1.org.

Deidre Huffman-Adoption Manager

Humane Society of the Treasure Coast

4100 SW Leighton Farm Ave-Palm City, FL 34990

(772)600-3204/dhuffman@hstc1.org

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Cats Show Specific Preferences in Music

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Article by Shannon Borrego

Do cats like music? You may think you know the answer to that question. “Yes, of course, they do!” you quickly respond. Whoa, not so fast; the correct answer isn’t that simple.

Cats do like music, but not the same sort of music enjoyed by humans. Emily Parker, writer and researcher, explains that cats don’t perceive music in the same way humans do. Humans react differently to classical music than we do to, say, rock music, but cats perceive all forms of music as nothing more than sounds. Because cats have different acoustic, vocal and heart beat ranges than humans, all music sounds pretty much the same to a cat—unless the music has been specifically composed for cats.

To prove this hypothesis, scientists conducted a study to determine whether cats showed a preference for certain music. Justin Scuiletti, of PBS News Hour, shared the details in his article, “Cats don’t like human music—play them this instead.” As part of the study, musician David Teie was asked by University of Wisconsin psychologists Megan Savage and Charles Snowdon to compose several cat-friendly musical pieces. Teie created “Cozmo’s Air,” “Spook’s Ditty,” and “Rusty’s Ballad.” Cats’ reactions to these musical pieces were compared with their reactions to Bach’s “Air on a G String,” and Gabriel Faure’s “Elegie”.

The cats showed a definite preference for Teie’s music, with “Cozmo’s Air” emerging as the favorite! The piece can be found on Spotify or YouTube should you decide to test it out on your cat.

You may well ask, “How could anyone determine what music cats might like?” Researchers Savage and Snowdon explain, “We have developed a theoretical framework that hypothesizes that in order for music to be effective with other species, it must be in the frequency range and with similar tempos to those used in natural communication by each species.” It is known that cats exhibit a hearing range of between 55 HZ on the low-pitched scale, and 79 HZ on the high-pitched scale. They can detect frequencies 1.6 octaves higher than frequencies heard by humans. So, Teie created his music with that in mind.

With the holidays approaching, you may find yourself pondering what to give your cat for Christmas. The gift of cat-targeted music might be just the thing. What cat wouldn’t love a copy of “Cozmo’s Air?” It’s sure to get his little feet tapping!

www.cffelines.org

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Local Realtor Rescues Lucky the Cat

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Lucky shortly after being rescued

Article by Shannon Borrego

“Relying on the kindness of strangers”; it’s a simple phrase with a powerful message. I would venture to say that almost every lost or abandoned animal that has survived has done so due to the kindness of strangers. Such was the case with Lucky the cat.

Realtor Mary Lou Rada first met Lucky when she was checking a property in the community of Golden Gate. He was very friendly, but he appeared undernourished. When Mary Lou noticed a woman working nearby, she asked about the cat. The women said she had seen him hanging about for a week or so, and that she fed him Cheerios sometimes. Clearly, the cat needed rescuing.

Mary Lou, unwilling to leave the cat behind, became the stranger whose kindness saved Lucky. She didn’t have a carrier, blanket or food with her, but she knew someone who did: Katherine Goodman. A quick call to Katherine brought her to the scene, bearing a carrier and two cans of cat food. Lucky was so excited to have something besides Cheerios to eat that he ran right into the carrier and gobbled the food down.

Mary Lou and the cat headed home for the night. The next day they paid a visit to Savanna Animal Hospital to get Lucky checked out. After a thorough examination, Dr. Ries had some unfortunate news: Lucky suffered from a rare auto-immune disease that caused the cat’s own saliva to dissolve his teeth. The teeth were unsalvageable, and he had to have every single tooth extracted. Additionally, the cat had broken his front leg at some point and the elbow had healed in such a way that the leg did not bend. But Lucky had learned to adapt.

Despite his troubles, Lucky remained a sweet and trusting boy. Mary Lou was confident she could find a loving home for him and set about making some phone calls. But, before she could find him a home, she received a call from Jennifer Strauss at Savanna. Dr. Ries and the staff were smitten with Lucky and wanted to keep him as a clinic cat. What a perfect solution!

Lucky’s happy forever home came about due to kindnesses performed by “strangers” who stepped in to help this plucky feline. No doubt, there are many homeless cats right here in our community. Will you offer a helping hand? Caring Fields Felines does so every day.

www.cffelines.org

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Local Realtor Rescues Lucky the Cat

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Article by Shannon Borrego

“Relying on the kindness of strangers”; it’s a simple phrase with a powerful message. I would venture to say that almost every lost or abandoned animal that has survived has done so due to the kindness of strangers. Such was the case with Lucky the cat.

Realtor Mary Lou Rada first met Lucky when she was checking a property in the community of Golden Gate. He was very friendly, but he appeared undernourished. When Mary Lou noticed a woman working nearby, she asked about the cat. The women said she had seen him hanging about for a week or so, and that she fed him Cheerios sometimes. Clearly, the cat needed rescuing.

Mary Lou, unwilling to leave the cat behind, became the stranger whose kindness saved Lucky. She didn’t have a carrier, blanket or food with her, but she knew someone who did: Katherine Goodman. A quick call to Katherine brought her to the scene, bearing a carrier and two cans of cat food. Lucky was so excited to have something besides Cheerios to eat that he ran right into the carrier and gobbled the food down.

Mary Lou and the cat headed home for the night. The next day they paid a visit to Savanna Animal Hospital to get Lucky checked out. After a thorough examination, Dr. Ries had some unfortunate news: Lucky suffered from a rare auto-immune disease that caused the cat’s own saliva to dissolve his teeth. The teeth were unsalvageable, and he had to have every single tooth extracted. Additionally, the cat had broken his front leg at some point and the elbow had healed in such a way that the leg did not bend. But Lucky had learned to adapt.

Despite his troubles, Lucky remained a sweet and trusting boy. Mary Lou was confident she could find a loving home for him and set about making some phone calls. But, before she could find him a home, she received a call from Jennifer Strauss at Savanna. Dr. Ries and the staff were smitten with Lucky and wanted to keep him as a clinic cat. What a perfect solution!

Lucky’s happy forever home came about due to kindnesses performed by “strangers” who stepped in to help this plucky feline. No doubt, there are many homeless cats right here in our community. Will you offer a helping hand? Caring Fields Felines does so every day.

www.cffelines.org

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IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS
Pet Poison Helpline – 855-764-7661
($49 per incident fee applies)

ASPCA Pet Poison Control – 888-426-4435
($65 consultation fee may be applied)

Pet Emergency of Martin County – 772-781-3302
2239 S. Kanner Hwy Stuart FL

Veterinary Medical Center of St. Lucie County – 772-337-8570
7790 S. US Hwy 1 Port Saint Lucie FL

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PET PALS

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Refer a friends and you will both receive at $25 credit on your account!

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Smile for the Camera!

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We are one good lookin’ group!

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Avoiding “Forever” Home Failure Should Be A Priority

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Article by: Shannon Borrego

Photos by: Donna Loew
Maurice: A young cat recently returned to CFF due to adopter’s allergies

Finding a “forever” home sounds like the perfect outcome for a homeless cat, doesn’t it? And, for many cats it is. An adopter meets the cat, falls in love, and the pair goes on to spend many rewarding years together.

But what about those cases in which the adoption doesn’t work out? What happens when the home isn’t “forever” after all? Perhaps a family member develops allergies, or an unexpected move makes it difficult to take the cat, or the adopter just decides he doesn’t want a cat after all.

For those of us who work with rescue animals, the thought of relinquishing a pet seems almost unimaginable. We see our pets as family members, for better or for worse. But it doesn’t always work that way. At Caring Fields Felines, we recognize that when an adoption fails, the cat needs to be assured of safe sanctuary and the opportunity to find another home. That’s why we ask adopters to sign a document agreeing to return the cat to us should they need to relinquish it. Of course, we see that as a last resort. There are often solutions that enable the adopter to keep the cat when some modifications are made in the home.

The best way to avoid the sad dilemma of an unwanted cat is proper planning beforehand. Adopting a pet should never be an impulse decision, nor should a pet be given as a surprise to an unsuspecting recipient. The responsibility to provide a lifetime of care to any animal should not be taken lightly.

One of the common reasons for returning a cat is a family member’s development of allergies. This problem can sometimes be avoided by spending time with cats before adopting. An afternoon spent at CFF’s sanctuary playing with the cats is a great way to determine if one is allergic.

Timing is another important factor in deciding whether to adopt. If you face a move in the near future, it probably isn’t the best time to adopt. Some apartment complexes or rental homes have policies prohibiting pets, thus necessitating a choice between the home or the pet. Better to wait and adopt later!

Adopting a new cat should be an exciting beginning to a lifetime of rewarding companionship. Before taking the plunge, please consider the long-term commitment needed, and take steps to avoid the possibility of relinquishing the cat later.

www.cffelines.org

Out2martincounty.com is a photo journal featuring people, “Who they are, what they do and where they do it”.

Do you have something to say, an event to talk about? An event you would like to have covered? Do it here!

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Out2 Doggie Recipes

Easy Homemade Raw Dog Food

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Flaxseed Dog Biscuits

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Peanut Butter and Banana Frozen Dog Treats

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Out2News 2018  Past Pets of the Week!!!!!!!

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All Pets Go To Heaven

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Article by: Robin Hall – Out2News/Out2martincounty.com

There is a very special place where beloved pets go after they die. This is only a temporary location. But there are trees and grass and lakes, and everything they love. Here they can play and eat and sleep, even better than they did, before they died. Now, there are no aches or worries or dangers of any kind to trouble or threaten them. The only joy missing is their beloved human companion, you.

All health is restored completely, and all injuries are healed. Dogs and cats play with each other like youngsters, and they do not have time to feel lonely for you. They miss you, and with the special wisdom that animals have, they trust that this condition will get better. And they confidently wait as they frolic.

A wonderful day will come for each of them, when in the middle of playing they will suddenly feel something is different. And all their senses will be at the height of excitement and exuberance. They will sniff the air and look off in the distance where they recognize that dearly loved special presence. Then they will call out in elation, and with eyes shining and tail going wild, tear off at a full gallop, almost flying over the green grass.

The bond that we form with animals can be very deep and fulfilling, and the loss of a beloved animal can have an impact on us that is as great, or even greater, than the loss of a family member or friend. This bond is what makes our interactions with animals rich and rewarding, but also what makes the grief process so complicated. The grief can seem to come in waves, may be brought on more intensely by a sight or sound that sparks your memory, and may seem overwhelming at times.

After your pet has died or been lost, it is natural and normal to feel grief and sorrow. The amount of time a person grieves for the loss of their pet may be very different for different people. Although grief is an internal and private response, there are certain stages of grief that most people experience, and not everyone experiences them all or in the same order.Anger and guilt often follow denial.

Your anger may be directed toward people you normally love and respect, including your family, friends or your veterinarian. People coping with death will often say things that they do not really mean, unintentionally hurting those whom they do not mean to hurt.

Depression is a common experience after the death of a special pet. The tears flow, there are knots in your stomach, and you feel drained of all your energy. Day-to-day tasks can seem impossible to perform and you may feel is isolated and alone. Many depressed people will avoid the company of friends and family.

You will come to terms with your feelings. You begin to accept your pet’s death. Resolution has occurred when you can remember your pet and your time with them without feeling the intense grief and emotional pain you previously felt. Acceptance and resolution are normal and do not mean that you no longer feel a sense of loss, just that you have come to terms with the fact that your pet has died. Everyone experiences the stages of grief, grieving is always a very personal process. Allow yourself time to grieve and heal, and be thankful that your life was made that much better by sharing it with your beloved pet.

Memorializing a pet can be a healthy part of the grieving process. A framed photo or a photo album can help remind a pet parent of their pet. Some people keep the ashes of their pets and bury them in a spot favored by their pet. Creating a journal that includes stories about the things your dog did will help you focus on the good times you spent together.   Photographs record those special moments and lock them forever in time. Have a professional portrait painted as a memorial to your dog companion. If you enjoy gardening, plant a tree, perennial, bush or shrub in memory of your dog. Donate to an animal organization in your dog’s name.  Some pet lovers place a brick or stone with their pet’s name painted on it in their gardens or they buy specially designed and inscribed grave markers if their pet is buried on their property.

Realizing that a seemingly trifle, yet possibly most-significant part of pet ownership is doing the right thing for our pets at the end of their lives. Sometimes the hardest things to do are the best things we can do. Loving animals teaches us something about ourselves and so does letting them go…

Out2 Bark Byte is dedicated to Robin Hall’s – Owner of Out2News best friend “Teddy”. RIP 8/4/2015

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