In Memoriam

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Richard Shaw Hall Jr. December 9, 1944 – April 1, 2018

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Richard Shaw Hall, Jr. December 9, 1944 – Was an American publisher with a marketing and sales background. Mr. Hall was born on Staten Island, in New York City. He attended Port Richmond High School where he experienced his first exposure to the world of publishing when he, for 4 years, worked on the school’s yearbook.

He attended City College of New York (Staten Island) from 1963 and 1964. He then embarked on an adventure to Kentucky, Morehead State University where he finished his undergraduate degree with majors in History, Sociology and Psychology, with minors in Business and Biology.

He returned to New York and began a teaching career in the field of Special Education specifically “Learning Behavioral Disabilities” at the secondary level (7th grade – 12th grade) at the 600 school on Staten Island housed on the Mt Loretto campus.

He attended Columbia University Graduate School with an emphasis in “Behavioral Psychology”.

After several lengthy teachers strikes he was offered an opportunity to move to Columbus, Ohio working for B.F. Skinner, designing and implementing behavioral modification programs imbedded in curriculum. He also did field research in that field and staff development. From 1969 – 1972 he was on loan to the University of Pittsburg (Leaning Resource Development Center) working with a field research program called I.P.I (Individualized Prescribed Instruction). In 1970, when the publishing rights for I.P.I. was acquired by New Century Education Corporation, Mr. Hall returned to the world of publishing. He remained with New Century until 1975.

During this time Mr. Hall was involved with Open Court publishing, editing the synthetic phonics “Foundation” program.

From 1976 to 1979 Mr. Hall became aware of school of educational thought spearheaded by Dr. Arthur Whimby, author of” Intelligence Can Be Taught” and began a relationship with a company called I.S.I (Innovative Sciences, Inc.) who brought behavioral management techniques together with the cognitive learning strategies of Whimby.

In 1979 he joined the Ohio based C.O.I.N. (Coordinated Occupational Information Network) an information database serving the guidance counselors across the country.

In 1986 after the sale of C.O.I.N. to Bell & Howell, Mr. Hall joined the Marketing and Sales department of Cambridge Book Company.

He achieved his highest success with Out2News, an online publishing newspaper effort created for the local Treasure Coast Community with a News/citizen journal emphasis. He called it the “Happy” news!

Perhaps the most important roll Mr. Hall prized was that of loving husband and devoted father. He adored his family and put them first in all that he did.

He is survived by his wife Robin Hall of 37 years, son Richard Shaw Hall III, son Andrew Shaw Hall and daughter in law Erica Hall and close family friend Sasha Dacosta.

In Lieu of flowers memorial donations can be made in memory of: Richard S Hall Scholarship to Martin County Youth Leadership 1650 South Kanner Highway Stuart, FL 34994.

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Barbara Bush – June 8, 1925 – April 17, 2018

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Barbara Bush (née Pierce; June 8, 1925 – April 17, 2018) was the wife of George H. W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, and served as First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. She had previously served as Second Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. Among her six children are George W. Bush, the 43rd President, and Jeb Bush, the 43rd Governor of Florida.

Barbara Pierce was born in New York City. She met George Herbert Walker Bush at age 16, and the two married in Rye, New York, in 1945, while he was on leave during his deployment as a Naval officer in World War II. They moved to Midland, Texas, where he entered political life, in 1950.

As First Lady of the United States, Bush worked to advance the cause of universal literacy, founding the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy.

Barbara Pierce was born in New York City on June 8, 1925 to Pauline (née Robinson; 1896–1949) and Marvin Pierce (1893–1969). She was raised in the suburban town of Rye, New York. Her father later became president of McCall Corporation, the publisher of the popular women’s magazines Redbook and McCall’s. She grew up with two elder siblings, Martha and James, and a younger brother, Scott. Her ancestor Thomas Pierce Jr., an early New England colonist, was also an ancestor of Franklin Pierce, 14th president of the United States. She was a fourth cousin, four times removed, of Franklin Pierce and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Pierce and her three siblings were raised in a house on Onondaga Street in Rye. She attended Milton Public School from 1931 to 1937, Rye Country Day School until 1940 and later the boarding school Ashley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina, from 1940 to 1943.In her youth, Pierce was athletic and enjoyed swimming, tennis, and bike riding. Her interest in reading began early in life; she recalled gathering and reading with her family during the evenings.

When Pierce was 16 and on Christmas vacation, she met George Bush at a dance at the Round Hill Country Club in Greenwich, Connecticut; he was a student at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. After 18 months, the two became engaged to be married, just before he went off to World War II as a Navy torpedo bomber pilot. He named three of his planes after her: Barbara, Barbara II, and Barbara III. When he returned on leave, she had discontinued her studies at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts; two weeks later, on January 6, 1945, they were married at the First Presbyterian Church in Rye, New York,with the reception being held at The Apawamis Club.

For the first eight months of their marriage, the Bushes moved around the Eastern United States, to places including Michigan, Maryland, and Virginia, where George Bush’s Navy squadron training required his presence.

Over the next 13 years, George and Barbara Bush had six children, who between them gave the couple a total of 14 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren:

George W. Bush (b. 1946), who married Laura Welch on November 5, 1977. They have twin daughters, and two granddaughters.
Robin Bush (1949–1953), who died of leukemia at the age of three.
Jeb Bush (b. 1953), who married Columba Gallo on February 23, 1974. They have three children, and four grandchildren.
Neil Bush (b. 1955), who married Sharon Smith in 1980; they divorced in April 2003. They have three children, and one grandson. Neil married Maria Andrews in 2004.
Marvin Bush (b. 1956), who married Margaret Molster in 1981. They have two children.
Dorothy Bush Koch (b. 1959), who married William LeBlond in 1982; they divorced in 1990, and have two children. Dorothy married Robert P. Koch in June 1992; they have two children.

In 1966, George Bush was elected as a U.S. Representative in Congress from Texas. Barbara raised her children while her husband campaigned and occasionally joined him on the trail. Over the ensuing years, George Bush was elected or appointed to several different positions in the U.S. Congress or the executive branch, or government-related posts, and Barbara Bush accompanied him in each case.

The Bushes celebrate in Houston on the evening in 1966 that George was elected a congressman

As the wife of a Congressman, Barbara immersed herself in projects that piqued her interest; the projects included various charities and Republican women’s groups in Washington, D.C. Though her husband lost a second bid for the Senate in 1970, President Richard Nixon appointed him the United States Ambassador to the United Nations, which enabled Barbara to begin forming relationships in New York City with prominent diplomats. As the Watergate scandal heated up in 1973, Nixon asked Bush to become Chairman of the Republican National Committee; Barbara advised her husband to reject the offer because of the harsh political climate,but he accepted anyway.

Nixon’s successor, Gerald R. Ford, appointed Bush head of the U.S. Liaison Office in the People’s Republic of China in 1974, and the Bushes relocated. She enjoyed the time that she spent in China and often rode bicycles with her husband to explore cities and regions that few Americans had visited. Three years later, Bush was recalled to the U.S. to serve as Director of Central Intelligence during a crucial time of legal uncertainty for the agency. He was not allowed to share classified aspects of his job with Barbara; the ensuing sense of isolation, coupled with her perception that she was not achieving her goals while other women of her time were, plunged her into a depression. She did not seek professional help. Instead, she began delivering speeches and presentations about her time spent in the closed-off China, and volunteered at a hospice.

Barbara Bush defended her husband’s experience and personal qualities when he announced his candidacy for President of the United States in 1980. She caused a stir when she said that she supported ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment and was pro-choice on abortion, placing her at odds with the conservative wing of the Republican party, led by California Governor Ronald Reagan. Reagan earned the presidential nomination over her husband, who then accepted Reagan’s invitation to be his running mate; the team was elected in 1980.

Family literacy was Barbara Bush’s cause as First Lady, and she called it “the most important issue we have”. She became involved with many literacy organizations, served on literacy committees and chaired many reading organizations. Eventually, she helped develop the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy. She continued to be dedicated to eliminating the generational cycle of illiteracy in America by supporting programs where parents and their young children are able to learn together. During the early 1980s, after statistics had shown that foreign-born immigrants from Latin America had nearly quintupled just since 1960, statistics showed that 35 million adults could not read above the eighth-grade level and that 23 million were not able to read beyond a fourth-grade level. Mrs. Bush appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show to discuss the situation and spoke regularly on Mrs. Bush’s Story Time, a national radio program that stressed the importance of reading aloud to children.Her children Jeb Bush

and Dorothy Bush Koch serve as co-chairs of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy. During her lifetime Mrs. Bush remained active in the foundation and served as honorary chair.

She was active in the White House Historical Association and worked to revitalize the White House Preservation Fund, which she renamed the White House Endowment Trust. The trust raises funds for the ongoing refurbishment and restoration of the White House. She met her goal of raising $25 million towards the endowment. The White House residence staff generally found Barbara Bush to be the friendliest and most easygoing of the First Ladies with whom they dealt.

In March 1989, Bush’s press office reported that she had Graves’ disease. In June of that year, President Bush said of his wife that “…she is doing just fine. And I think her doctors would say the same thing. She’s got this Grave’s disease under control.”

Bush was known for her affection for her pet English Springer Spaniel Millie and wrote a children’s book about Millie’s new litter of puppies. She even included Millie in her official white house portrait, painted by Candace Whittemore Lovely.Barbara Bush became the first U.S. First Lady to become a recipient of the Henry G. Freeman Jr. Pin Money Fund, receiving $36,000, most of which she gave to favorite charities.

Bush delivered a famous commencement address at Wellesley College in 1990; she was joined by Raisa Gorbacheva, wife of Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev

She was struck every day by “how much things had changed” for her and her husband since they became President and First Lady. In place of a limousine, Bush tried to use a smaller car and travel by train and commercial aircraft for out-of-town trips. The heads of Bush’s Secret Service detail were partially opposed to her wishes; the agents agreed to the small car but did not approve of the commercial air and train travel. At that time, the number of threats to the First Lady was higher than that of the vice president. Bush still wanted to use public transportation despite the opposition of the Secret Service. She was put-off by the fact that her flights would be delayed while agents checked out the planes and luggage. The plane on which Bush traveled was nicknamed “Bright Star,” in honor of the leukemia foundation her husband and Hugh Liedtke founded after her daughter Robin died.

She gave the Wellesley College commencement address in 1990; her speech was listed as #45 in American Rhetoric’s Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century (listed by rank).

The First Lady visits patients at Children’s Hospital in Washington, D.C., 1990

During her husband’s 1992 presidential campaign, Barbara Bush stated that abortion and homosexuality are personal matters and argued that the Republican Party platform should not take a stand on it, saying that “The personal things should be left out of, in my opinion, platforms and conventions.” Her personal views on abortion were not known, although her friends reported at that time that she “privately supported abortion rights.” She explained, “I hate abortions, but I just could not make that choice for someone else.”

When Bush lived in the White House, she disclosed that she was suffering from Graves’ disease, which is an overactive thyroid ailment; the condition coincidentally affected her husband. It is rare for two biologically unrelated people in the same household to develop Graves disease within two years of each other.

Bush was more popular than her immediate predecessor Nancy Reagan and successor Hillary Clinton because she carefully “avoided controversy” and took very few public positions on contentious issues.After leaving the White House, she and her husband resided at the River Oaks community in Houston, Texas, and at the Bush compound in Kennebunkport, Maine. Bush described January 20, 1993, the day of Bill Clinton’s inauguration, a “tough day” for her and her husband. After returning to Houston, the two were visited by their son, George W. Bush, and at that point, Bush realized that she had not cooked in 12 years. She had difficulty driving a car on her own, and she did not drive far from home for a long time; her husband warned people to get out of the way if they saw her car.A month after her husband left office in February 1993, Bush was surprised when her husband booked them on the “Love Boat” ship Regal Princess. In April 1993, Bush and her husband had breakfast with the former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who was on an American speaking tour. Thatcher mentioned the most recent celebration of former President Ronald Reagan’s birthday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, where he orated the same card twice. Bush read about the incident after Reagan was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, which she called a “tragedy for both” the Reagans.

President George W. Bush and his mother Barbara prepare to board Air Force One, 2005

Bush attempted to persuade her son George W. Bush not to run for Governor of Texas in the 1994 gubernatorial election. She was convinced that he could not defeat Ann Richards, but he went on to win the election. Several days after he was sworn in as Governor of Texas, she went to a Distinguished Speakers Event at the LBJ Library for Lady Bird Johnson. There, she was introduced by her son, the new Governor of Texas, and the following day, received a letter from him dated January 18, 1995, in which he asserted that he would not be governor had it not been for her and George H. W. Bush. Mrs. Bush described the letter as having “moved” both her and her husband.

On April 19, 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was the target of a lone wolf domestic terrorist bombing that left 168 people dead. One of the people who died in the attack was Al Whicher, who had served on George H. W. Bush’s Secret Security detail. Bush called the man who served under her husband “a devoted husband and father”. The next day, April 20, 1995, the Bushes were scheduled to go to Tulsa, Oklahoma. Barbara was supposed to speak at a Junior League event in the noon and accompany her husband at the Salvation Army annual dinner. The Bushes debated whether or not they should continue with their plans due to the bombing, ultimately deciding to go, because “both groups help people in need.” On September 3, 1995, the Bushes went to Vietnam. This was “unbelievable” to Barbara because she “never expected to set foot in what had been North Vietnam. The Bushes first went to Hanoi and then to Ho Chi Minh City. They met with President Lê Đức Anh and party secretary Đỗ Mười. On September 28, 1995, the Bushes drove to Portland, Maine, for the announcement of the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital. Bush said her life was being stretched, adding, “Long after I am gone this hospital will be there with my name.” The Bushes visited the children there, and Mrs. Bush started to recall her daughter Robin after seeing them. The Bushes returned home early that month.

Bush campaigned for her son George W. Bush after he announced his presidential campaign in June 1999. Throughout the country, she met with women in support of his campaign but remained doubtful of his chances of winning. The resentment toward the campaign continued with her rejecting any criticism of her son said in her presence and she refused to watch any debates, a contrast to her husband’s willingness to listen and his watching of every debate, creating friction between the couple.

Several schools have been named for her: three primary schools and two middle schools in Texas and an elementary school in Mesa, Arizona. Also named for her is the Barbara Bush Library in Harris County, Texas, and the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine. She served on the Boards of AmeriCares and the Mayo Clinic, and headed the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy.

On March 18, 2003—two days before the beginning of the 2003 invasion of Iraq—her son George W. Bush was President. ABC’s Good Morning America asked her about her family’s television viewing habits. She replied:

I watch none. He sits and listens and I read books, because I know perfectly well that, don’t take offense, that 90 percent of what I hear on television is supposition, when we’re talking about the news. And he’s not, not as understanding of my pettiness about that. But why should we hear about body bags and deaths, and how many, what day it’s gonna happen, and how many this or that or what do you suppose? Or, I mean, it’s not relevant. So, why should I waste my beautiful mind on something like that, and watch him suffer.

George and Barbara Bush attend the christening ceremony for the eponymous aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush, October 2006

Bush was visiting a Houston relief center for people displaced by Hurricane Katrina when she told the radio program Marketplace,

Almost everyone I’ve talked to says, ‘We’re gonna move to Houston.’ What I’m hearing, which is sort of scary, is they all want to stay in Texas… Everybody is so overwhelmed by the hospitality, and so many of the people in the arenas here, you know, were underprivileged anyway, so this (as she chuckles slightly) is working very well for them.

The remarks generated controversy.In 2006, it was revealed that Barbara Bush donated an undisclosed amount of money to the Bush–Clinton Katrina Fund on the condition that the charity do business with an educational software company owned by her son Neil Bush.

Bush was diagnosed with Graves’ disease in 1988. Later on, she suffered from congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Bush was a heavy smoker for 25 years, quitting in 1968 when a nurse condemned her smoking in her hospital room after a surgery.

In November 2008, Bush was hospitalized for abdominal pains and underwent small intestine surgery.She underwent aortic valve replacement surgery in March 2009.

Bush was hospitalized with pneumonia on New Year’s Eve 2013 and was released from the hospital a few days later.

In April 2018, her family released a statement regarding her failing health, stating that she had chosen to be at home with family and seek “comfort care” rather than further treatment.According to family spokesman Jim McGrath, her decision came as a result of “a series of recent hospitalizations.”

Bush died in her Houston home at the age of 92 on April 17, 2018. Her son George W. Bush tweeted, “My dear mother has passed on at age 92. Laura, Barbara, Jenna, and I are sad, but our souls are settled because we know hers was I’m a lucky man that Barbara Bush was my mother. Our family will miss her dearly, and we thank you all for your prayers and good wishes.” President Donald Trump ordered the nation’s flag to half-staff in Barbara Bush’s memory and he and First Lady Melania Trump sent condolences, saying: “As a wife, mother, grandmother, military spouse, and former First Lady, Mrs. Bush was an advocate of the American family…She will be long remembered for her strong devotion to country and family…”Former Presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, and Barack Obama also sent condolences. Some foreign leaders including Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Russian President Vladimir Putin also sent condolences.

Her funeral will be held at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston on April 21, 2018, with burial at the George Bush Presidential Library in College Station, Texas.

 

 

 

 

 

Susan Rae Mallery – February 07, 1939 – April 08, 2018

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Susan Rae Mallery passed peacefully on April 8, 2018 surrounded by her family at Treasure Coast Hospice.

She was born on February 7, 1939 in Vincennes, Indiana and is survived by her loving husband Jerry, her beloved son and daughter Curtis and Julia and her grandson Anthony and his wife Victoria along with her two loving Jack Russell terriers Ben and Cassie. Susan not only was Anthony’s grandmother, but together with Jerry they raised him as their own. She was a high school math teacher at Good Shepard Center in

Maryland for many years. She loved to travel, create picture books and the holidays, especially Christmas. Susan was a caring and generous woman who loved her family more than anything. She left behind a wonderful legacy and she will be truly missed.
A graveside service will be at 1:30pm on Wednesday, April 11th, 2018 at Forest Hills Memorial Park in Palm City, FL.

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William T. McCreary – May 02, 1943 – April 06, 2018

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William T. McCreary, 74, of Palm City, Florida, passed away on April 6, 2018 at his home.

Born in Bellaire, Ohio, he had been a resident of Martin County for over 35 years.

He was a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and received a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Miami.

While serving in the Army, he was a helicopter pilot during the Vietnam War.

Before retiring he was the owner of an insurance services company.

Survivors include: his wife of 52 years Roberta McCreary, his four sons, Michael and Stephanie, Tim, Scott and Phong, Tom and Carrie; 8 grandchildren and his sisters, Mary Richenbach and Donna Greenwood.

There will be celebration of life service at 10:00 AM on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Treasure Coast Community Church (TC3), 20 NE Dixie Highway, Stuart, FL.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Care Net Pregnancy Services of the Treasure Coast, 6704 US Highway 1, Port St. Lucie, FL 34952 in William’s memory.

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Plant A Tree In Israel

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Plant a tree in Israel to recognize or memorialize friends, family, and loved ones.

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Donald L. “Don” Keyser – August 25, 1942 – April 5, 2018

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Donald L. “Don” Keyser, 75, of Palm City, Florida, passed away April 5, 2018 at the Florida Hospital, Orlando, Florida.

Born in Paterson, New Jersey, he had been a resident of Palm City for 27 years coming from Stratford, Connecticut.

Before retiring he had been an aircraft mechanic for Avco Lycoming in Stratford as well as other aerospace and automotive firms.

Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Carol A. Keyser of Palm City; his son Robert R. Keyser and his wife Louise of Palm City; his daughter, Sharyl Mandeville and her husband Louis of Oxford, CT; 6 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. He was preceded in death by his son Thomas Keyser and his brother, Robert R. Keyser.

Visitation will be from 4:00 to 7:00 PM on Monday, April 9, 2018 at the Forest Hills Funeral Home, Palm City, FL. The funeral service will be at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, April 10 in the funeral home chapel.

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BIOS URN

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Marina Elizabeth Nauta Timmer – June 29, 1934 – April 5, 2018

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Marian Elizabeth Nauta Timmer, age 83 passed away on Thursday, April 5, 2018 at Rainey Hospice House.

Born in Grand Rapids, MI, on June 29, 1934, Marian was the daughter of the late Nick Nauta and the late Jeanette Nyp Nauta. She was a homemaker and a faithful member of Rock Springs Baptist Church.

Marian was the quintessential homemaker taking care of her husband, Jim and their three sons. Whether it was Grand Rapids, MI., Tequesta, FL., or Easley, SC., Marian made many friends wherever she went. We know she will be missed by those friends and are thankful for their presence in her life.

Survivors include her sons, James Richard Timmer, III and his wife Sharon and Daniel J. Timmer and his wife Denise; a brother, Arnold Jack Nauta; grandchildren, Brett Timmer and his wife Kari; Luke Timmer, Candace Johnson Timmer and her husband Brian; Thomas Timmer and his wife Bekah; and four great-grandchildren.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, James Richard “Homer” Timmer, Jr. and their son, David Lee Timmer.

A graveside service will be held at Forest Hills Memorial Park in Palm City, FL., at 11:00 am Tuesday, April 10, 2018 with Pastor Jay Pitts officiating.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice of the Upstate, 1835 Rogers Road, Anderson, SC 29621.

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Richard D. Forrest – February 11, 1934 – March 31, 2018

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Richard D. Forrest, 84, of Palm City, Florida, passed away on March 31, 2018 at Martin Memorial Medical Center, Stuart.

Born in Quincy, Massachusetts, he had been a resident of Palm City for 14 years coming from Hull, Massachusetts.

Before retiring he was an insurance agent for Mahoney and Wright Insurance in Weymouth, MA.

He was a member of Evergreen Golf Club, Palm City.

Survivors include his wife of 64 years, Elizabeth A. Forrest of Palm City; his son Mark Forrest of Palm City; his daughters, Beth Forrest McDonough of Stoughton, MA and Sally Forrest of Weymouth, MA and his grandchildren, Alan Glenn Parker and Elizabeth Belle Parker of Lewiston, PA.

There will be a memorial service at 1:00 PM on April 5, 2018 at the Forest Hills Funeral Home Palm City.

In lieu of flowers Richard’s family requests contributions may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 39105, 800/822-6344 or on line at www.stjude.org in Richard’s memory.

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Ethel E. Slater Holland – August 28, 1921 – March 30, 2018

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A vibrant soul, Ethel E. Slater Holland, 96, of Palm City, Florida, passed away on March 30, 2018 at the Treasure Coast Hospice, Stuart, Florida, after having lived a wonderful full life.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, she had been a resident of Palm City for 24 years coming from Hillsdale, New Jersey.

She was a homemaker, volunteer, golf club champion, sharp bridge player, bowler, tennis player, seamstress, a great dancer and loved a good party!

She was a former member of the High Point Country Club, Montague, NJ, the Port Jervis Country Club, Port Jervis, NY and a member of the Martin Downs Country Club, Palm City.

After her first husband, Bernie Slater, passed away, Ethel started a new life in Martin Downs married to Vincent Holland. Together, they traveled the world, played golf, and delighted in their time together to the fullest.

Survivors include her daughters, Beverly Slater- Sheehan of San Diego, CA, Susan Hughes and Nancy Schlag both of Palm City; her son Charles Slater of Ramsey, NJ; her sister Genevieve Watjen of Park Ridge, NJ; 8 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren.

Visitation will be from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM at Forest Hills Funeral Home, Palm City, FL. A celebration of life will be at 12:30 PM on Saturday, April 7, 2018, in the funeral home chapel.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Treasure Coast Hospice, at Treasure Health, 1201 SE Indian Street, Stuart, FL 34997, or at 772/403-4500 or on line at www.treasurehealth.org, American Heart Association, 1100 East Ocean Boulevard, Stuart, FL 34996 or at 772/286-1966, or the American Cancer Society, 865 SE Monterey Commons Boulevard, Stuart, FL 34996 or on line at www.cancer.org

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Arlene L. Jacobs – February 23, 1934 – March 27, 2018

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Arlene L. Jacobs – February 23, 1934 – March 27, 2018 – Arlene Louise Jacobs, 84, of Palm City, Florida, passed away March 27, 2018, after a courageous battle with cancer.

She was born in Gibson City, Illinois, where she met and married Elmer and then proceeded to make many moves to support him in his career.

She was a member of Holy Redeemer Catholic Church in Palm City.

She is survived by her husband of 63 years, Elmer L. Jacobs of Palm City FL; daughters, Lori J. Riordan of Stuart, FL and Gwen M. Leeper of Gardner, KS; sons, Paul J. Jacobs (Pamela) of Bradford, New Zealand, and Samuel J. Jacobs (Elisa) of Winter Park, FL; 8 grandchildren, and 3 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her children, Mark W. Jacobs, David W. Jacobs and Nanette L. Jacobs.

Arlene was an outstanding wife, mother, homemaker, and a center of strength for our family. She chose to make her family, friends, neighbors, and community social groups her priority. She touched many lives with her special caring manner and will be greatly missed by all.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10:00 AM, Friday, April 27th at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church in Palm City immediately followed by a Celebration of Life Service at Sandhill Cove Retirement Community in Palm City, FL.

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James L. Walsh – January 6, 1937 – March 26, 2018

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James L. Walsh, 81, of Stuart, Florida, passed away on March 26, 2018 at his home.

Born in Peabody, Massachusetts, he had been a resident of Stuart for 16 years coming from Little Silver, New Jersey.

He graduated from Buckingham Brown and Nichols School, Cambridge MA, attended the University of Pennsylvania and graduated from Boston University.

He is survived by his wife, Janet; his daughters, Catherine Walsh, Deborah Shea and Janet Kiger and her husband Ronald; his brother John Walsh; his grandchildren, Erin Shea, Lauren Shea, Sean Wetherell, Caroline Wetherell, Michael Kiger and his great-grandson, Joseph Shea.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10:00 AM on Friday, April 20, 2018 at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Palm City.

For those who wish, contributions may be made for Treasure Coast Hospice at Treasure Health, 1201 SE Indian Street, Stuart, FL 34997, or on line at www.treasurehealth.org in Mr. Walsh’s memory.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Forest Hills Funeral Home, Palm City. There is an online registry at: www.foresthillspalmcityflorida.com.

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Edward A Bailey, Col. (Ret) USMC – November 3, 1924 – March 24, 2018

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Edward (Ed) Bailey, a man of honor and integrity, received his call to go home to be with his Lord and his Savior on March 24, 2018. His passing was peaceful and many members of his large and loving family surrounded him as he went to his new home. A very large hole has been left in our hearts that only time will heal.

Ed was born in Philadelphia, PA. on November 3, 1924, the son of Joan Mulvihill Bailey and Edward Riley Bailey of Rydal, PA. He was the eldest of 11 children. He was the nephew of Col. E.R. Bradley of Lexington, Ky, and Palm Beach, FL; owner of four Kentucky Derby winners. He graduated from Abington High School where he met Joy Rogers, the love of his life. He graduated from Duke University and entered the military in 1942.

Ed had a fulfilling and distinguished career. He was truly a Marine’s Marine dedicated to the Corps serving with honor and he loved and respected all who served with him. His Commands were always challenging, and he often said being a Marine was the best job in the world! He served 27 years and ascended to the rank of Colonel. After retiring from the service he joined Marriott Corporation where he held several executive positions in the hotel Industry.

Ed and Joy retired to Port St. Lucie, FL in 1980. He was an avid bowler and had his season tickets to the Mets! He loved all sports that were played with a ball and loudly cheered his teams.

Ed and Joy just celebrated 73 years of a made-in-heaven marriage, full of countless adventures and wonderful memories. He leaves behind Joy and their six children, Merilee Landrigan (Bob), Wendy Hoge (Geof), Edward Jr. (Karen), Roger (Marsha), Robin Pelensky (Mark) and Joy Russen (John), in addition to 13 grandchildren and 23 great-grandchildren, all who feel blessed to call this wonderful, special man, Dad and Ole Dad.

He loved his family and he loved life! He lit up a room just by walking in to it. Saying “goodbye” is beyond difficult. Psalm 27:4 “The one thing I ask from the LORD, this only do I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to gaze on the beauty of the LORD and to seek him in his temple.”

Visitation 3-4:30 PM, Sunday, April 22, 2018 at Aycock Life Celebration Center at Tradition, 12571 SW Tradition Pkwy, Port St. Lucie, FL. 34987.

Memorial Service and Inurnment on Monday, April 23, 2018, 1:00 PM at Forest Hills Funeral Home & Memorial Park., 2001 SW Murphy Rd., Palm City, FL 34990

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H. Wayne Huizenga – December 29, 1937 – March 22, 2018

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H. Wayne Huizenga, a college dropout who built a business empire that included Blockbuster Entertainment, AutoNation and three professional sports franchises, has died. He was 80.

Huizenga (HY’-zing-ah) died Thursday night at his home, said Valerie Hinkell, a longtime assistant. She gave no details on a cause of death.

Starting with a single garbage truck in 1968, Huzienga built Waste Management Inc. into a Fortune 500 company. He purchased independent sanitation engineering companies, and by the time he took the company public in 1972, he had completed the acquisition of 133 small-time haulers. By 1983, Waste Management was the largest waste disposal company in the United States.
The business model worked again with Blockbuster Video, which he started in 1985 and built into the leading movie rental chain nine years later. In 1996, he formed AutoNation and built it into a Fortune 500 company.

Huizenga was founding owner of baseball’s Florida Marlins and the NHL Florida Panthers — expansion teams that played their first games in 1993. He bought the NFL Miami Dolphins and their stadium for $168 million in 1994 from the children of founder Joe Robbie, but had sold all three teams by 2009.

The Marlins won the 1997 World Series, and the Panthers reached the Stanley Cup Finals in 1996, but Huizenga’s beloved Dolphins never reached a Super Bowl while he owned the team.

“If I have one disappointment, the disappointment would be that we did not bring a championship home,” Huizenga said shortly after he sold the Dolphins to New York real estate billionaire Stephen Ross. “It’s something we failed to do.”

Huizenga earned an almost cult-like following among business investors who watched him build Blockbuster Entertainment into the leading video rental chain by snapping up competitors. He cracked Forbes’ list of the 100 richest Americans, becoming chairman of Republic Services, one of the nation’s top waste management companies, and AutoNation, the nation’s largest automotive retailer. In 2013, Forbes estimated his wealth at $2.5 billion.

For a time, Huizenga was also a favorite with South Florida sports fans, drawing cheers and autograph seekers in public. The crowd roared when he danced the hokey pokey on the field during an early Marlins game. He went on a spending spree to build a veteran team that won the World Series in the franchise’s fifth year.

But his popularity plummeted when he ordered the roster dismantled after that season. He was frustrated by poor attendance and his failure to swing a deal for a new ballpark built with taxpayer money.

Many South Florida fans never forgave him for breaking up the championship team. Huizenga drew boos when introduced at Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino’s retirement celebration in 2000, and kept a lower public profile after that.

In 2009, Huizenga said he regretted ordering the Marlins’ payroll purge.

“We lost $34 million the year we won the World Series, and I just said, ‘You know what, I’m not going to do that,'” Huizenga said. “If I had it to do over again, I’d say, ‘OK, we’ll go one more year.'”

He sold the Marlins in 1999 to John Henry, and sold the Panthers in 2001, unhappy with rising NHL player salaries and the stock price for the team’s public company.

Huizenga’s first sports love was the Dolphins — he had been a season-ticket holder since their first season in 1966. But he fared better in the NFL as a businessman than as a sports fan.

He turned a nifty profit by selling the Dolphins and their stadium for $1.1 billion, nearly seven times what he paid to become sole owner. But he knew the bottom line in the NFL is championships, and his Dolphins perennially came up short.

Huizenga earned a reputation as a hands-off owner and won raves from many loyal employees, even though he made six coaching changes. He eased Pro Football Hall of Famer Don Shula into retirement in early 1996, and Jimmy Johnson, Dave Wannstedt, interim coach Jim Bates, Nick Saban, Cam Cameron and Tony Sparano followed as coach.

Harry Wayne Huizenga was born in the Chicago suburbs on Dec. 29, 1937, to a family of garbage haulers. He began his business career in Pompano Beach in 1962, driving a garbage truck from 2 a.m. to noon each day for $500 a month.

One customer successfully sued Huizenga, saying that in an argument over a delinquent account, Huizenga injured him by grabbing his testicles — an allegation Huizenga always denied.

“I never did that. The guy was a deputy cop. It was his word against mine, a young kid,” he told Fortune magazine in 1996.

Huizenga was a five-time recipient of Financial World magazine’s “CEO of the Year” award, and was the Ernst & Young “2005 World Entrepreneur of the Year.”

Regarding his business acumen, Huizenga said: “You just have to be in the right place at the right time. It can only happen in America.”

In 1960, he married Joyce VanderWagon. Together they had two children, Wayne Jr. and Scott. They divorced in 1966. Wayne married his second wife, Marti Goldsby, in 1972. She died in 2017.

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James T. Beck, III – September 4, 1945 – March 21, 2018

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James Thomas Beck III, 72, of Stuart, Florida, passed away on March 21, 2018 at The Cabana at Jensen Dunes, Jensen Beach, Florida.

Born in Washington, Pennsylvania, he had been a resident of Stuart for 16 years coming from Sunrise, Florida. As youth, he had achieved the level of Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy.

Before retiring he was the Parts Director at Eddie Accardi Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Mazda Subaru in Pompano Beach, Florida for over 20 years.

Although of the Presbyterian faith, he attended Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Palm City.

Survivors include his wife Joyce Beck of Stuart; his son James T. Beck IV of Pompano Beach, FL; his daughter, Renee Humbert and her husband Nicholas of Ashburn, VA; his brother, Robert Beck and his wife Linda of Washington, PA; and his grandchildren, Kelsie Humbert and Heath Humbert both of Ashburn.

There will be Christian Prayer Service at 10:00 AM on Saturday, April 14, 2018 at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Palm City. Inurnment will be in Forest Hills Memorial Park, Palm City, FL.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 3323 W Commercial Blvd., Suite 260, Fort Lauderdale, FL 3330 in Mr. Beck’s memory.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Forest Hills Funeral Home, Palm City.

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Carmine Curcio December 29, 1935 – March 19, 2018

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He was born in Italy. Carmine’s journey began in 1960. He immigrated to the United States as a young man of 25 years old from Salerno, Italy bringing with him his mother’s original recipes, and in 1961 opened his first Italian Restaurant in Atlantic City, NJ called Isle of Capri. In 1962 he opened Sorrento’s Pizza in Clifton, NJ, and in 1963 he founded and opened Sun Ray Pizzeria on Cross Street, Downtown Paterson later moving it to Wayne Avenue in Paterson. In 1970 Carmine paying tribute and honoring his beloved mother founded and opened Mamma Teresa on Hamburg Turnpike in Wayne, NJ. In 1980 he opened Marco’s Italian Restaurant in Wayne. Later on opening II Gamberia Rosa in Haskell, NJ in 1985, and in 1987 founded and opened Roman Garden’s Italian Ristorante, Banquet and Supper Club.

Carmine and his beloved wife RoseMarie became snowbirds from 1989 until 1994, then permanently relocated to Florida in 1995 from New Jersey where they founded and owned some of the finest and best 4 star authentic Italian Restaurants, Pizzerias, Supper Club, Wedding and Banquet facility in the area. Among which included Sun Ray Pizzeria, Mamma Teresa, Marco’s and II Gamberia Rosa and Roman Garden. Most recently, he was the owner of LaBorgata Restaurant in Palm City.

He enjoyed raising animals, in particular, sheep and chickens, and was a winemaker. Cooking was Carmine’s passion and providing his loyal customers of family and friends nothing short of excellent service.

He was a member of Holy Redeemer Catholic Church.

He is survived by his children; Angelo Curcio, Joseph Curcio and MariaTeresa Curcio; 5 grandchildren; 1 great grandchild and a brother, Luigi Curcio of New Jersey. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 52 years, RoseMarie Curcio in 2017.

Visitation: 2:00 – 4:00 PM & 7:00 – 9:00 PM, with a prayer service at 7:30PM, Thursday, March 22, 2018 at Forest Hills Funeral Home, Palm City Chapel.

Mass of Christian Burial: 11:30 AM Friday, March 23, 2018 at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church in Palm city.

Entombment will follow in Forest Hills Memorial Park.

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Margaret Kabzan – October 30, 1940 – March 17, 2018

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Peggy was a nurse’s aide and was a member of St. Andrew Catholic Church in Stuart. She was a devoted wife, mother and friend. We will dearly miss our “Sweet Peggy”.

She is survived by her husband, Paul of Stuart, FL; sons, PJ and Nick of Stuart, FL; and many other loving family member and friends.

Her Celebration of Life will be held on Monday, March 26, 2018 from 2:00-4:00PM at Aycock Funeral Home, Young and Prill Chapel in South Stuart with a funeral service to begin at 3:00PM with Father John A. Barrow officiating.

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Stephen William Hawking January 8, 1942 – March 14, 2018

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Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018) was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author, and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge. His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

Hawking was a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC’s poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book A Brief History of Time appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks.

Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis “ALS” or Lou Gehrig’s disease) that gradually paralysed him over the decades. Even after the loss of his speech, he was still able to communicate through a speech-generating device, initially through use of a hand-held switch, and eventually by using a single cheek muscle. He died on 14 March 2018 at the age of 76.
Hawking was born on 8 January 1942 in Oxford to Frank (1905–1986) and Isobel Eileen Hawking (née Walker; 1915–2013). Hawking’s mother was Scottish.Despite their families’ financial constraints, both parents attended the University of Oxford, where Frank read medicine and Isobel read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. While Isobel worked as a secretary for a medical research institute, Frank was a medical researcher. Hawking had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward Frank David (1955–2003).

In 1950, when Hawking’s father became head of the division of parasitology at the National Institute for Medical Research, the family moved to St Albans, Hertfordshire. In St Albans, the family were considered highly intelligent and somewhat eccentric; meals were often spent with each person silently reading a book. They lived a frugal existence in a large, cluttered, and poorly maintained house and travelled in a converted London taxicab. During one of Hawking’s father’s frequent absences working in Africa,the rest of the family spent four months in Majorca visiting his mother’s friend Beryl and her husband, the poet Robert Graves.
Hawking began his schooling at the Byron House School in Highgate, London. He later blamed its “progressive methods” for his failure to learn to read while at the school.In St Albans, the eight-year-old Hawking attended St Albans High School for Girls for a few months. At that time, younger boys could attend one of the houses.

Hawking attended two independent (i.e. fee-paying) schools, first Radlett School and from September 1952, St Albans School, after passing the eleven-plus a year early.The family placed a high value on education.Hawking’s father wanted his son to attend the well-regarded Westminster School, but the 13-year-old Hawking was ill on the day of the scholarship examination. His family could not afford the school fees without the financial aid of a scholarship, so Hawking remained at St Albans. A positive consequence was that Hawking remained with a close group of friends with whom he enjoyed board games, the manufacture of fireworks, model aeroplanes and boats, and long discussions about Christianity and extrasensory perception.From 1958 on, with the help of the mathematics teacher Dikran Tahta, they built a computer from clock parts, an old telephone switchboard and other recycled components.

Although known at school as “Einstein”, Hawking was not initially successful academically. With time, he began to show considerable aptitude for scientific subjects and, inspired by Tahta, decided to read mathematics at university. Hawking’s father advised him to study medicine, concerned that there were few jobs for mathematics graduates. He also wanted his son to attend University College, Oxford, his own alma mater. As it was not possible to read mathematics there at the time, Hawking decided to study physics and chemistry. Despite his headmaster’s advice to wait until the next year, Hawking was awarded a scholarship after taking the examinations in March 1959.
Hawking began his university education at University College, Oxford, in October 1959 at the age of 17.For the first 18 months, he was bored and lonely – he found the academic work “ridiculously easy”. His physics tutor, Robert Berman, later said, “It was only necessary for him to know that something could be done, and he could do it without looking to see how other people did it.” A change occurred during his second and third year when, according to Berman, Hawking made more of an effort “to be one of the boys”. He developed into a popular, lively and witty college member, interested in classical music and science fiction.Part of the transformation resulted from his decision to join the college boat club, the University College Boat Club, where he coxed a rowing crew. The rowing coach at the time noted that Hawking cultivated a daredevil image, steering his crew on risky courses that led to damaged boats.

Hawking estimated that he studied about 1,000 hours during his three years at Oxford. These unimpressive study habits made sitting his finals a challenge, and he decided to answer only theoretical physics questions rather than those requiring factual knowledge. A first-class honours degree was a condition of acceptance for his planned graduate study in cosmology at the University of Cambridge. Anxious, he slept poorly the night before the examinations, and the final result was on the borderline between first- and second-class honours, making a viva (oral examination) necessary. Hawking was concerned that he was viewed as a lazy and difficult student. So, when asked at the oral[clarification needed] to describe his plans, he said, “If you award me a First, I will go to Cambridge. If I receive a Second, I shall stay in Oxford, so I expect you will give me a First.” He was held in higher regard than he believed; as Berman commented, the examiners “were intelligent enough to realise they were talking to someone far cleverer than most of themselves”. After receiving a first-class BA (Hons.) degree in natural science and completing a trip to Iran with a friend, he began his graduate work at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, in October 1962.
Hawking’s first year as a doctoral student was difficult. He was initially disappointed to find that he had been assigned Dennis William Sciama, one of the founders of modern cosmology, as a supervisor rather than noted Yorkshire astronomer Fred Hoyle, and he found his training in mathematics inadequate for work in general relativity and cosmology. After being diagnosed with motor neurone disease, Hawking fell into a depression – though his doctors advised that he continue with his studies, he felt there was little point. His disease progressed more slowly than doctors had predicted. Although Hawking had difficulty walking unsupported, and his speech was almost unintelligible, an initial diagnosis that he had only two years to live proved unfounded. With Sciama’s encouragement, he returned to his work. Hawking started developing a reputation for brilliance and brashness when he publicly challenged the work of Fred Hoyle and his student Jayant Narlikar at a lecture in June 1964.

When Hawking began his graduate studies, there was much debate in the physics community about the prevailing theories of the creation of the universe: the Big Bang and Steady State theories. Inspired by Roger Penrose’s theorem of a spacetime singularity in the centre of black holes, Hawking applied the same thinking to the entire universe; and, during 1965, he wrote his thesis on this topic. Hawking’s thesis was approved in 1966.There were other positive developments: Hawking received a research fellowship at Gonville and Caius College at Cambridge;[80] he obtained his PhD degree in applied mathematics and theoretical physics, specialising in general relativity and cosmology, in March 1966;and his essay “Singularities and the Geometry of Space-Time” shared top honours with one by Penrose to win that year’s prestigious Adams Prize.
In his work, and in collaboration with Penrose, Hawking extended the singularity theorem concepts first explored in his doctoral thesis. This included not only the existence of singularities but also the theory that the universe might have started as a singularity. Their joint essay was the runner-up in the 1968 Gravity Research Foundation competition. In 1970 they published a proof that if the universe obeys the general theory of relativity and fits any of the models of physical cosmology developed by Alexander Friedmann, then it must have begun as a singularity. In 1969, Hawking accepted a specially created Fellowship for Distinction in Science to remain at Caius.

In 1970, Hawking postulated what became known as the second law of black hole dynamics, that the event horizon of a black hole can never get smaller.With James M. Bardeen and Brandon Carter, he proposed the four laws of black hole mechanics, drawing an analogy with thermodynamics. To Hawking’s irritation, Jacob Bekenstein, a graduate student of John Wheeler, went further—and ultimately correctly—to apply thermodynamic concepts literally. In the early 1970s, Hawking’s work with Carter, Werner Israel and David C. Robinson strongly supported Wheeler’s no-hair theorem, one that states that no matter what the original material from which a black hole is created, it can be completely described by the properties of mass, electrical charge and rotation. His essay titled “Black Holes” won the Gravity Research Foundation Award in January 1971. Hawking’s first book, The Large Scale Structure of Space-Time, written with George Ellis, was published in 1973.

Beginning in 1973, Hawking moved into the study of quantum gravity and quantum mechanics.His work in this area was spurred by a visit to Moscow and discussions with Yakov Borisovich Zel’dovich and Alexei Starobinsky, whose work showed that according to the uncertainty principle, rotating black holes emit particles.To Hawking’s annoyance, his much-checked calculations produced findings that contradicted his second law, which claimed black holes could never get smaller,and supported Bekenstein’s reasoning about their entropy.His results, which Hawking presented from 1974, showed that black holes emit radiation, known today as Hawking radiation, which may continue until they exhaust their energy and evaporate. Initially, Hawking radiation was controversial. By the late 1970s and following the publication of further research, the discovery was widely accepted as a significant breakthrough in theoretical physics.Hawking was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1974, a few weeks after the announcement of Hawking radiation. At the time, he was one of the youngest scientists to become a Fellow.

Hawking was appointed to the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished visiting professorship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1970. He worked with a friend on the faculty, Kip Thorne, and engaged him in a scientific wager about whether the X-ray source Cygnus X-1 was a black hole. The wager was an “insurance policy” against the proposition that black holes did not exist.Hawking acknowledged that he had lost the bet in 1990, a bet that was the first of several he was to make with Thorne and others. Hawking had maintained ties to Caltech, spending a month there almost every year since this first visit.
1975–1990

Hawking returned to Cambridge in 1975 to a more academically senior post, as reader in gravitational physics. The mid to late 1970s were a period of growing public interest in black holes and the physicists who were studying them. Hawking was regularly interviewed for print and television. He also received increasing academic recognition of his work. In 1975, he was awarded both the Eddington Medal and the Pius XI Gold Medal, and in 1976 the Dannie Heineman Prize, the Maxwell Prize and the Hughes Medal. He was appointed a professor with a chair in gravitational physics in 1977. The following year he received the Albert Einstein Medal and an honorary doctorate from the University of Oxford.

In 1979, Hawking was elected Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. His inaugural lecture in this role was titled: “Is the End in Sight for Theoretical Physics?” and proposed N=8 Supergravity as the leading theory to solve many of the outstanding problems physicists were studying.His promotion coincided with a health crisis which led to his accepting, albeit reluctantly, some nursing services at home.At the same time, he was also making a transition in his approach to physics, becoming more intuitive and speculative rather than insisting on mathematical proofs. “I would rather be right than rigorous”, he told Kip Thorne.In 1981, he proposed that information in a black hole is irretrievably lost when a black hole evaporates. This information paradox violates the fundamental tenet of quantum mechanics, and led to years of debate, including “the Black Hole War” with Leonard Susskind and Gerard ‘t Hooft.

Cosmological inflation – a theory proposing that following the Big Bang, the universe initially expanded incredibly rapidly before settling down to a slower expansion – was proposed by Alan Guth and also developed by Andrei Linde.Following a conference in Moscow in October 1981, Hawking and Gary Gibbons organised a three-week Nuffield Workshop in the summer of 1982 on “The Very Early Universe” at Cambridge University, a workshop that focused mainly on inflation theory. Hawking also began a new line of quantum theory research into the origin of the universe. In 1981 at a Vatican conference, he presented work suggesting that there might be no boundary – or beginning or ending – to the universe.He subsequently developed the research in collaboration with Jim Hartle, and in 1983 they published a model, known as the Hartle–Hawking state. It proposed that prior to the Planck epoch, the universe had no boundary in space-time; before the Big Bang, time did not exist and the concept of the beginning of the universe is meaningless. The initial singularity of the classical Big Bang models was replaced with a region akin to the North Pole. One cannot travel north of the North Pole, but there is no boundary there – it is simply the point where all north-running lines meet and end. Initially, the no-boundary proposal predicted a closed universe, which had implications about the existence of God. As Hawking explained, “If the universe has no boundaries but is self-contained… then God would not have had any freedom to choose how the universe began.”

Hawking did not rule out the existence of a Creator, asking in A Brief History of Time “Is the unified theory so compelling that it brings about its own existence?” In his early work, Hawking spoke of God in a metaphorical sense. In A Brief History of Time he wrote: “If we discover a complete theory, it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason – for then we should know the mind of God.” In the same book he suggested that the existence of God was not necessary to explain the origin of the universe. Later discussions with Neil Turok led to the realisation that the existence of God was also compatible with an open universe.

Further work by Hawking in the area of arrows of time led to the 1985 publication of a paper theorising that if the no-boundary proposition were correct, then when the universe stopped expanding and eventually collapsed, time would run backwards.A paper by Don Page and independent calculations by Raymond Laflamme led Hawking to withdraw this concept. Honours continued to be awarded: in 1981 he was awarded the American Franklin Medal, and in the 1982 New Year Honours appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). These awards did not significantly change Hawking’s financial status, and motivated by the need to finance his children’s education and home expenses, he decided in 1982 to write a popular book about the universe that would be accessible to the general public.Instead of publishing with an academic press, he signed a contract with Bantam Books, a mass market publisher, and received a large advance for his book. A first draft of the book, called A Brief History of Time, was completed in 1984.

One of the first messages Hawking produced with his speech-generating device was a request for his assistant to help him finish writing A Brief History of Time. Peter Guzzardi, his editor at Bantam, pushed him to explain his ideas clearly in non-technical language, a process that required many revisions from an increasingly irritated Hawking. The book was published in April 1988 in the US and in June in the UK, and it proved to be an extraordinary success, rising quickly to the top of best-seller lists in both countries and remaining there for months. The book was translated into many languages, and ultimately sold an estimated 9 million copies.Media attention was intense, and a Newsweek magazine cover and a television special both described him as “Master of the Universe”. Success led to significant financial rewards, but also the challenges of celebrity status.Hawking travelled extensively to promote his work, and enjoyed partying and dancing into the small hours.A difficulty refusing the invitations and visitors left him limited time for work and his students. Some colleagues were resentful of the attention Hawking received, feeling it was due to his disability. He received further academic recognition, including five more honorary degrees, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society (1985), the Paul Dirac Medal (1987 )and, jointly with Penrose, the prestigious Wolf Prize (1988).In the 1989 Birthday Honours, he was appointed a Companion of Honour (CH). He reportedly declined a knighthood.
1990–2000
Hawking outside, in his wheelchair, talking to David Gross and Edward Witten
Hawking with string theorists David Gross and Edward Witten at the 2001 Strings Conference, TIFR, India

Hawking pursued his work in physics: in 1993 he co-edited a book on Euclidean quantum gravity with Gary Gibbons and published a collected edition of his own articles on black holes and the Big Bang.In 1994, at Cambridge’s Newton Institute, Hawking and Penrose delivered a series of six lectures that were published in 1996 as “The Nature of Space and Time”. In 1997, he conceded a 1991 public scientific wager made with Kip Thorne and John Preskill of Caltech. Hawking had bet that Penrose’s proposal of a “cosmic censorship conjecture” – that there could be no “naked singularities” unclothed within a horizon – was correct.After discovering his concession might have been premature, a new and more refined wager was made. This one specified that such singularities would occur without extra conditions.The same year, Thorne, Hawking and Preskill made another bet, this time concerning the black hole information paradox. Thorne and Hawking argued that since general relativity made it impossible for black holes to radiate and lose information, the mass-energy and information carried by Hawking radiation must be “new”, and not from inside the black hole event horizon. Since this contradicted the quantum mechanics of microcausality, quantum mechanics theory would need to be rewritten. Preskill argued the opposite, that since quantum mechanics suggests that the information emitted by a black hole relates to information that fell in at an earlier time, the concept of black holes given by general relativity must be modified in some way.

Hawking also maintained his public profile, including bringing science to a wider audience. A film version of A Brief History of Time, directed by Errol Morris and produced by Steven Spielberg, premiered in 1992. Hawking had wanted the film to be scientific rather than biographical, but he was persuaded otherwise. The film, while a critical success, was not widely released. A popular-level collection of essays, interviews, and talks titled Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays was published in 1993, and a six-part television series Stephen Hawking’s Universe and a companion book appeared in 1997. As Hawking insisted, this time the focus was entirely on science.
2000–2018
Stephen Hawking sitting in his wheelchair insideHawking at the Bibliothèque nationale de France to inaugurate the Laboratory of Astronomy and Particles in Paris, and the French release  of his work God Created the Integers, 5 May 2006

Hawking continued his writings for a popular audience, publishing The Universe in a Nutshell in 2001, and A Briefer History of Time, which he wrote in 2005 with Leonard Mlodinow to update his earlier works with the aim of making them accessible to a wider audience, and God Created the Integers, which appeared in 2006. Along with Thomas Hertog at CERN and Jim Hartle, from 2006 on Hawking developed a theory of “top-down cosmology”, which says that the universe had not one unique initial state but many different ones, and therefore that it is inappropriate to formulate a theory that predicts the universe’s current configuration from one particular initial state. Top-down cosmology posits that the present “selects” the past from a superposition of many possible histories. In doing so, the theory suggests a possible resolution of the fine-tuning question.

Hawking continued to travel widely, including trips to Chile, Easter Island, South Africa, Spain (to receive the Fonseca Prize in 2008), Canada,and numerous trips to the United States. For practical reasons related to his disability, Hawking increasingly travelled by private jet, and by 2011 that had become his only mode of international travel.
Hawking with University of Oxford librarian Richard Ovenden (left) and naturalist David Attenborough (right) at the opening of the Weston Library, Oxford, in March 2015. Ovenden awarded the Bodley Medal to Hawking and Attenborough at the ceremony.

By 2003, consensus among physicists was growing that Hawking was wrong about the loss of information in a black hole. In a 2004 lecture in Dublin, he conceded his 1997 bet with Preskill, but described his own, somewhat controversial solution to the information paradox problem, involving the possibility that black holes have more than one topology. In the 2005 paper he published on the subject, he argued that the information paradox was explained by examining all the alternative histories of universes, with the information loss in those with black holes being cancelled out by those without such loss. In January 2014, he called the alleged loss of information in black holes his “biggest blunder”.

As part of another longstanding scientific dispute, Hawking had emphatically argued, and bet, that the Higgs boson would never be found. The particle was proposed to exist as part of the Higgs field theory by Peter Higgs in 1964. Hawking and Higgs engaged in a heated and public debate over the matter in 2002 and again in 2008, with Higgs criticising Hawking’s work and complaining that Hawking’s “celebrity status gives him instant credibility that others do not have.”The particle was discovered in July 2012 at CERN following construction of the Large Hadron Collider. Hawking quickly conceded that he had lost his bet and said that Higgs should win the Nobel Prize for Physics, which he did in 2013.
Hawking holding a public lecture at the Stockholm Waterfront congress centre, 24 August 2015

In 2007, Hawking and his daughter Lucy published George’s Secret Key to the Universe, a children’s book designed to explain theoretical physics in an accessible fashion and featuring characters similar to those in the Hawking family. The book was followed by sequels in 2009, 2011, 2014 and 2016.

In 2002, following a UK-wide vote, the BBC included Hawking in their list of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was awarded the Copley Medal from the Royal Society (2006), the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which is America’s highest civilian honour (2009), and the Russian Special Fundamental Physics Prize (2013).

Several buildings have been named after him, including the Stephen W. Hawking Science Museum in San Salvador, El Salvador, the Stephen Hawking Building in Cambridge, and the Stephen Hawking Centre at the Perimeter Institute in Canada.Appropriately, given Hawking’s association with time, he unveiled the mechanical “Chronophage” (or time-eating) Corpus Clock at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge in September 2008.

During his career, Hawking supervised 39 successful PhD students. One doctoral student did not successfully complete their PhD.As required by Cambridge University regulations, Hawking retired as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics in 2009.Despite suggestions that he might leave the United Kingdom as a protest against public funding cuts to basic scientific research, Hawking worked as director of research at the Cambridge University Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

On 28 June 2009, as a tongue-in-cheek test of his 1992 conjecture that travel into the past is effectively impossible, Hawking held a party open to all, complete with hors d’oeuvres and iced champagne, but publicised the party only after it was over so that only time-travellers would know to attend; as expected, nobody showed up to the party.

On 20 July 2015, Hawking helped launch Breakthrough Initiatives, an effort to search for extraterrestrial life. Hawking created Stephen Hawking: Expedition New Earth, a documentary on space colonisation, as a 2017 episode of Tomorrow’s World.

In August 2015, Hawking said that not all information is lost when something enters a black hole and there might be a possibility to retrieve information from a black hole according to his theory. In July 2017, Hawking was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Imperial College London.
When Hawking was a graduate student at Cambridge, his relationship with Jane Wilde, a friend of his sister whom he had met shortly before his late 1963 diagnosis with motor neurone disease, continued to develop. The couple became engaged in October 1964 – Hawking later said that the engagement gave him “something to live for” – and the two were married on 14 July 1965.

During their first years of marriage, Jane lived in London during the week as she completed her degree, and they travelled to the United States several times for conferences and physics-related visits. The couple had difficulty finding housing that was within Hawking’s walking distance to the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP). Jane began a PhD programme, and a son, Robert, was born in May 1967.A daughter, Lucy, was born in 1970.A third child, Timothy, was born in April 1979.

Hawking rarely discussed his illness and physical challenges, even – in a precedent set during their courtship – with Jane. His disabilities meant that the responsibilities of home and family rested firmly on his wife’s increasingly overwhelmed shoulders, leaving him more time to think about physics. Upon his appointment in 1974 to a year-long position at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, Jane proposed that a graduate or post-doctoral student live with them and help with his care. Hawking accepted, and Bernard Carr travelled with them as the first of many students who fulfilled this role. The family spent a generally happy and stimulating year in Pasadena.

Hawking returned to Cambridge in 1975 to a new home and a new job, as reader. Don Page, with whom Hawking had begun a close friendship at Caltech, arrived to work as the live-in graduate student assistant. With Page’s help and that of a secretary, Jane’s responsibilities were reduced so she could return to her thesis and her new interest in singing.

By December 1977, Jane had met organist Jonathan Hellyer Jones when singing in a church choir. Hellyer Jones became close to the Hawking family, and by the mid-1980s, he and Jane had developed romantic feelings for each other. According to Jane, her husband was accepting of the situation, stating “he would not object so long as I continued to love him”. Jane and Hellyer Jones determined not to break up the family, and their relationship remained platonic for a long period.

By the 1980s, Hawking’s marriage had been strained for many years. Jane felt overwhelmed by the intrusion into their family life of the required nurses and assistants.The impact of his celebrity was challenging for colleagues and family members, while the prospect of living up to a worldwide fairytale image was daunting for the couple.Hawking’s views of religion also contrasted with her strong Christian faith and resulted in tension. In the late 1980s, Hawking had grown close to one of his nurses, Elaine Mason, to the dismay of some colleagues, caregivers, and family members, who were disturbed by her strength of personality and protectiveness. Hawking told Jane that he was leaving her for Mason, and departed the family home in February 1990. After his divorce from Jane in 1995, Hawking married Mason in September, declaring, “It’s wonderful – I have married the woman I love.”

In 1999, Jane Hawking published a memoir, Music to Move the Stars, describing her marriage to Hawking and its breakdown. Its revelations caused a sensation in the media but, as was his usual practice regarding his personal life, Hawking made no public comment except to say that he did not read biographies about himself. After his second marriage, Hawking’s family felt excluded and marginalised from his life. For a period of about five years in the early 2000s, his family and staff became increasingly worried that he was being physically abused. Police investigations took place, but were closed as Hawking refused to make a complaint.

In 2006, Hawking and Mason quietly divorced, and Hawking resumed closer relationships with Jane, his children, and his grandchildren. Reflecting this happier period, a revised version of Jane’s book called Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen appeared in 2007, and was made into a film, The Theory of Everything, in 2014.
Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, “ALS”, or Lou Gehrig’s disease), that gradually paralysed him over the decades.

Hawking had experienced increasing clumsiness during his final year at Oxford, including a fall on some stairs and difficulties when rowing.The problems worsened, and his speech became slightly slurred and his family noticed the changes when he returned home for Christmas, and medical investigations were begun. The diagnosis of motor neurone disease came when Hawking was 21, in 1963. At the time, doctors gave him a life expectancy of two years.

In the late 1960s, Hawking’s physical abilities declined: he began to use crutches and ceased lecturing regularly. As he slowly lost the ability to write, he developed compensatory visual methods, including seeing equations in terms of geometry. The physicist Werner Israel later compared the achievements to Mozart composing an entire symphony in his head.Hawking was fiercely independent and unwilling to accept help or make concessions for his disabilities. He preferred to be regarded as “a scientist first, popular science writer second, and, in all the ways that matter, a normal human being with the same desires, drives, dreams, and ambitions as the next person.”His wife, Jane Hawking, later noted: “Some people would call it determination, some obstinacy. I’ve called it both at one time or another.” He required much persuasion to accept the use of a wheelchair at the end of the 1960s, but ultimately became notorious for the wildness of his wheelchair driving.Hawking was a popular and witty colleague, but his illness, as well as his reputation for brashness, distanced him from some.

Hawking’s speech deteriorated, and by the late 1970s he could be understood by only his family and closest friends. To communicate with others, someone who knew him well would interpret his speech into intelligible speech. Spurred by a dispute with the university over who would pay for the ramp needed for him to enter his workplace, Hawking and his wife campaigned for improved access and support for those with disabilities in Cambridge,including adapted student housing at the university. In general, Hawking had ambivalent feelings about his role as a disability rights champion: while wanting to help others, he also sought to detach himself from his illness and its challenges. His lack of engagement in this area led to some criticism.

During a visit to CERN on the border of France and Switzerland in mid-1985, Hawking contracted pneumonia, which in his condition was life-threatening; he was so ill that Jane was asked if life support should be terminated. She refused, but the consequence was a tracheotomy, which required round-the-clock nursing care and the removal of what remained of his speech. The National Health Service was ready to pay for a nursing home, but Jane was determined that he would live at home. The cost of the care was funded by an American foundation. Nurses were hired for the three shifts required to provide the round-the-clock support he required. One of those employed was Elaine Mason, who was to become Hawking’s second wife.

For his communication, Hawking initially raised his eyebrows to choose letters on a spelling card,but in 1986 he received a computer program called the “Equalizer” from Walter Woltosz, CEO of Words Plus, who had developed an earlier version of the software to help his mother-in-law, who also suffered from ALS and had lost her ability to speak and write.In a method he used for the rest of his life, Hawking could now simply press a switch to select phrases, words or letters from a bank of about 2,500–3,000 that were scanned. The program was originally run on a desktop computer. Elaine Mason’s husband, David, a computer engineer, adapted a small computer and attached it to his wheelchair. Released from the need to use somebody to interpret his speech, Hawking commented that “I can communicate better now than before I lost my voice.” The voice he used had an American accent and is no longer produced. Despite the later availability of other voices, Hawking retained this original voice, saying that he preferred it and identified with it.Originally, Hawking activated a switch using his hand and could produce up to 15 words a minute.Lectures were prepared in advance and were sent to the speech synthesiser in short sections to be delivered.

Hawking gradually lost the use of his hand, and in 2005 he began to control his communication device with movements of his cheek muscles,with a rate of about one word per minute. With this decline there was a risk of his developing locked-in syndrome, so Hawking collaborated with Intel researchers on systems that could translate his brain patterns or facial expressions into switch activations. After several prototypes that did not perform as planned, they settled on an adaptive word predictor made by the London-based startup SwiftKey, which used a system similar to his original technology. Hawking had an easier time adapting to the new system, which was further developed after inputting large amounts of Hawking’s papers and other written materials and uses predictive software similar to other smartphone keyboards. By 2009 he could no longer drive his wheelchair independently, but the same people who created his new typing mechanics were working on a method to drive his chair using movements made by his chin. This proved difficult, since Hawking could not move his neck, and trials showed that while he could indeed drive the chair, the movement was sporadic and jumpy. Near the end of his life, he was experiencing increased breathing difficulties, requiring a ventilator at times, and was hospitalised several times.
Disability outreach

Starting in the 1990s, Hawking accepted the mantle of role model for disabled people, lecturing and participating in fundraising activities. At the turn of the century, he and eleven other luminaries signed the Charter for the Third Millennium on Disability, which called on governments to prevent disability and protect the rights of the disabled. In 1999, Hawking was awarded the Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize of the American Physical Society.

In August 2012, Hawking narrated the “Enlightenment” segment of the 2012 Summer Paralympics opening ceremony in London. In 2013, the biographical documentary film Hawking, in which Hawking himself is featured, was released.In September 2013, he expressed support for the legalisation of assisted suicide for the terminally ill. In August 2014, Hawking accepted the Ice Bucket Challenge to promote ALS/MND awareness and raise contributions for research. As he had pneumonia in 2013, he was advised not to have ice poured over him, but his children volunteered to accept the challenge on his behalf.
Plans for a trip to space Hawking, without his wheelchair, floating weig htless in the air inside a planeHawking taking a zero-gravity flight in a reduced-gravity aircraft, 2007.

In late 2006, Hawking revealed in a BBC interview that one of his greatest unfulfilled desires was to travel to space;on hearing this, Richard Branson offered a free flight into space with Virgin Galactic, which Hawking immediately accepted. Besides personal ambition, he was motivated by the desire to increase public interest in spaceflight and to show the potential of people with disabilities. On 26 April 2007, Hawking flew aboard a specially-modified Boeing 727–200 jet operated by Zero-G Corp off the coast of Florida to experience weightlessness. Fears the manoeuvres would cause him undue discomfort proved groundless, and the flight was extended to eight parabolic arcs. It was described as a successful test to see if he could withstand the g-forces involved in space flight. At the time, the date of Hawking’s trip to space was projected to be as early as 2009, but commercial flights to space did not commence before his death.

Hawking died in his home in Cambridge, England, early in the morning of 14 March 2018, at the age of 76. His family stated that he died peacefully. He was eulogised by figures in science, entertainment, politics, and other areas.The college flag at Cambridge’s Gonville and Caius College flew at half-mast and a book of condolences was signed by students and visitors. A tribute was made to Hawking in the closing speech by IPC President Andrew Parsons at the closing ceremony of the 2018 Paralympic Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Hawking’s dates of birth and death fell on the 300th anniversary of Galileo’s death and the 139th anniversary of Einstein’s birth, respectively. He directed at least fifteen years before his death that the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy equation be his epitaph.

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Nole Floyd “Nokie” Edwards May 9, 1935 – March 12, 2018

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Nole Floyd “Nokie” Edwards (May 9, 1935 – March 12, 2018) was an American musician and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He was primarily a guitarist, best known for his work with The Ventures.[1] Edwards was also an actor, who appeared briefly on Deadwood, an American Western drama television series.

Edwards was born in Lahoma, Oklahoma, the son of Elbert and Nannie,[2] a Native American Cherokee.[citation needed] Edwards came from a family of accomplished musicians, so that by age five he began playing a variety of string instruments, including the steel guitar, banjo, mandolin, violin, and bass. His family relocated from Oklahoma to Puyallup, Washington.

During Edwards’ late teen years he joined the United States Army Reserve. After traveling to Texas and California for training, he returned home and began playing regularly for pay in numerous country bands in the area.

In January 1958, country songwriter and guitarist Buck Owens relocated from California to Tacoma, Washington, as owner of radio station KAYE. Prior to the formation of The Buckaroos with Don Rich, Edwards played guitar with Owens in the new band he formed in the area, and also played in the house band of television station KTNT, located in the same building as KAYE. In 1960 Edwards recorded a single, “Night Run” b/w “Scratch”, on Blue Horizon Records with a band called The Marksmen

The Ventures are an instrumental musical quartet founded in Tacoma, Washington, in 1958. Original members included Don Wilson on rhythm guitar, Bob Bogle on lead guitar (who later became the bass player), and drummer George Babbitt, who went on to become a 4-star general in the U.S. Air Force. When Babbitt left, Howie Johnson took his place, and was later replaced by Mel Taylor. Edwards met Wilson and Bogle when they performed on KTNT. Edwards originally played bass for The Ventures, but he took over the lead guitar position from Bogle.[1] The Ventures released a series of best-selling albums through 1968, at which time Edwards left; he would occasionally reunite with the band, however.

Edwards continued to tour Japan annually with The Ventures, primarily in winter, until 2012.

In 1969 Edwards began a solo career and released several albums through 1972. His solo attempt was unsuccessful in America, and he returned to the Ventures as lead guitarist in 1973. Edwards performed with the band until 1984, when he left again to pursue a music career in Nashville, Tennessee. He played lead guitar for Lefty Frizzell, on what would become Frizzell’s final recording sessions. In the late 1980s Edwards re-joined The Ventures once more for another short stint of recording and touring before returning to Nashville. Throughout the 1990s he was involved with numerous country-influenced recording projects.

Edwards performed occasionally in the United States as both a soloist and member of various bands, including AdVenture, Art Greenhaw, and Texas Western swing outfit The Light Crust Doughboys. The fruitful and critically acclaimed collaboration of Edwards and artist-producer Greenhaw resulted in a number of albums in several music genres including Edwards’ two nominations for “Grammy Award for Best Southern, Country or Bluegrass Gospel Album of the Year”, album titles 20th Century Gospel (2005) and Southern Meets Soul (2006).[3]

In July 2010, Deke Dickerson announced on his Facebook page that he was currently working on a new studio album with Nokie Edwards. Dickerson and his band backed Edwards for several shows, including Deke’s yearly Guitar Geek Festival held in Anaheim, California.

In 2008, Edwards was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, along with The Ventures. The award was presented by John Fogerty. The band performed their biggest hits, “Walk Don’t Run” and “Hawaii Five-0”, augmented on the latter by Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame musical director Paul Shaffer and his band.After accepting an offer to pursue an acting career, Edwards landed a role on Deadwood, an American Western drama television series. Edwards played the mysterious friend of Wild Bill Hickok and a local citizen, who serves as a bridge between the villains and heroes of the show. During production, Edwards temporarily relocated to Santa Clarita, California and lived on the set’s location with his wife Judy.

Edwards played Fender Telecasters during the 1950s and early 1960s, before switching to Mosrite guitars with The Ventures until 1967. For solo projects and with the Ventures, he also toured and recorded with Telecasters during the 1980s and 1990s.

Edwards designed the Nokie Edwards Custom Signature model Telecaster for Fender Guitars, which features gold hardware, an ebony fingerboard, sloped-back tilt headstock, zero fret, sealed tuners and Seymour Duncan humbucker pickups with split coils.Edwards designed and recently sold his own custom guitar, the HitchHiker, a hybrid of the best elements of the Fender Telecaster and Mosrite guitars. The HitchHiker features a sloped-back tilt headstock, a neck-through-body with swamp ash and quilted maple, zero fret, gold control plates, Seymour Duncan humbuckers with split coils, and an ebony fingerboard. Its bridge works on a slide scale invented by Edwards. The HitchHiker can simulate an acoustic guitar and provides 15 different sound selections. The body design is essentially the original Mosrite body, which Edwards preferred. The hybrid guitars are being crafted in New River, Arizona.

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David Ogden Stiers October 31, 1942 – March 3, 2018

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David Ogden Stiers (October 31, 1942 – March 3, 2018) was an American actor, voice actor and musician, noted for his role on the television series M*A*S*H as Major Charles Emerson Winchester III and the supernatural fiction drama The Dead Zone as Reverend Gene Purdy. He appeared prominently in the 1980s in the role of District Attorney Michael Reston in several Perry Mason TV movies and voiced Cogsworth in the 1991 film Beauty and the Beast and Dr. Jumba Jookiba in the 2002 film Lilo & Stitch and its sequels.Stiers was born in Peoria, Illinois, the son of Margaret Elizabeth (née Ogden) and Kenneth Truman Stiers. He attended Urbana High School as a freshman; one of his classmates was Roger Ebert.Stiers moved to Eugene, Oregon, where he graduated from North Eugene High School and briefly attended the University of Oregon. He later moved to San Francisco, where he performed with the California Shakespeare Theater, San Francisco Actors Workshop, and the improv group The Committee, whose members included Rob Reiner, Howard Hesseman and Peter Bonerz. Stiers studied at the Juilliard School (Drama Division Group 1: 1968–1972).

During his studies, Stiers was mentored by actor John Houseman, whose City Center Acting Company he later joined. Stiers first appeared in the Broadway production The Magic Show in 1974 in the minor role of Feldman. Subsequent early credits include The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Kojak, and Rhoda. Stiers also appeared in the pilot of Charlie’s Angels as the team’s chief back-up.In 1977, Stiers joined the cast of the CBS sitcom M*A*S*H. As Major Charles Emerson Winchester III, Stiers filled the void created by the departure of actor Larry Linville’s Frank Burns character. In contrast to the buffoonish Burns, Winchester was a well-spoken and talented surgeon who presented a different type of foil to Alan Alda’s Hawkeye Pierce and Mike Farrell’s B.J. Hunnicutt. Burns usually served as the butt of practical jokes instigated by Pierce or Hunnicutt, was frequently inundated by insults for which he had no comebacks, and his surgical skills were often harshly criticized. Winchester, however, presented a challenge to his colleagues’ displays of irreverence because his surgical skills could match or even outshine their own, and when it came to pranks and insults, he could give as good as he got; his aristocratic manner and aversion to puerile behavior served as the target for his fellow surgeons’ barbs and jokes. At times, however, Winchester could align himself with Pierce and Hunnicutt and, a few tantrums aside, he held considerable admiration for his commanding officer, Harry Morgan’s Col. Sherman T. Potter. For his portrayal of the pompous but nonetheless multifaceted Boston aristocrat, Stiers received two Emmy Award nominations.

After M*A*S*H completed its run in 1983, Stiers expanded his work on television with regular guest appearances on North and South; Star Trek: The Next Generation; Murder, She Wrote; Matlock; Touched by an Angel; Wings; and Frasier, along with a recurring role in Season 1 of Two Guys and a Girl as Mr. Bauer. In 1984, he portrayed United States Olympic Committee founder William Milligan Sloane in the NBC miniseries The First Olympics: Athens 1896 for which he received another Emmy nomination. Beginning in 1985, Stiers made his first of eight appearances in Perry Mason made-for-TV movies as District Attorney Michael Reston. He had guest appearances on ALF and Matlock. He appeared in two unsuccessful television projects, Love & Money and Justice League of America (as the Martian Manhunter). In 2002, Stiers started a recurring role as the Reverend Purdy on the successful USA Network series The Dead Zone with Anthony Michael Hall. In 2006, he was cast as the recurring character Oberoth in Stargate Atlantis.

Stiers provided voice work for dozens of film and television projects. His first work was on one of George Lucas’ earliest films, the critically acclaimed THX 1138, in which he was incorrectly billed as “David Ogden Steers”. Stiers voiced PBS documentary films such as Ric Burns’ project New York: A Documentary Film, 2010 Peabody Award winner The Lord is Not on Trial Here Today and several episodes of the documentary television series The American Experience, including Ansel Adams (2002), also directed by Ric Burns. In 1992, he voiced Mr. Piccolo in the animated English-dubbed version of Porco Rosso. He collaborated with Disney on eight animated features, including 1991’s Beauty and the Beast (as Cogsworth, also providing the opening narration), 1995’s Pocahontas (as Governor Ratcliffe and Wiggins), 1996’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame (as the Archdeacon), 2001’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire (as Mr. Harcourt), and 2002’s Lilo & Stitch (as Jumba Jookiba). He lent his voice to the direct-to-video Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (2003) as the Penguin. Stiers did voice work for Solovar in a two-part episode “The Brave and The Bold” of Justice League and voiced Solovar again in a Justice League Unlimited episode “Dead Reckoning”. He voiced Mr. Jolly from Teacher’s Pet. He voiced the king and prime minister in the 2004 short film The Cat That Looked at a King. In Hoodwinked (2005), the animated movie partly based on Little Red Riding Hood, Stiers voiced the role of Nicky Flippers, the frog detective who is dispatched to Granny’s house. He voiced Pop’s father, Mr. Maellard, in the animated TV series Regular Show, which debuted in 2010. Stiers had voices in several video games, including Icewind Dale, Kingdom Hearts II, Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep, as Jeff Zandi in Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, and as Esher in Myst V: End of Ages.

Stiers was the reader for numerous audiobook versions of novels, include Tom Wolfe’s A Man in Full (1998), and Colleen McCullough’s The First Man in Rome.Stiers was the associate conductor for the Newport (Oregon) Symphony Orchestra and the Ernest Bloch Music Festival.He also guest-conducted over 70 orchestras around the world, including the Oregon Mozart Players, the Vancouver Symphony, the Virginia Symphony, the Oregon Chamber Players, the Yaquina (Oregon) Chamber Orchestra, as well as orchestras in San Francisco, San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago and Toronto.

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Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister – 23 March 1929 – 3 March 2018

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Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister CH CBE (23 March 1929 – 3 March 2018) was a British middle-distance athlete, doctor and academic, who ran the first sub-four-minute mile.

In the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Bannister set a British record in the 1500 metres and finished fourth. This strengthened his resolve to be the first 4-minute miler. He achieved this feat on 6 May 1954 at Iffley Road track in Oxford, with Chris Chataway and Chris Brasher providing the pacing. When the announcer, Norris McWhirter, declared “The time was three…”, the cheers of the crowd drowned out Bannister’s exact time, which was 3 minutes 59.4 seconds. Bannister’s record lasted just 46 days. He had reached this record with minimal training, while practising as a junior doctor.

Bannister went on to become a distinguished neurologist and Master of Pembroke College, Oxford, before retiring in 1993. When asked whether the 4-minute mile was his proudest achievement, he said he felt prouder of his contribution to academic medicine through research into the responses of the nervous system. Bannister was patron of the MSA Trust. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2011.Bannister was born in Harrow, England.[3][4] He went to Vaughan Road Primary School in Harrow and continued his education at City of Bath Boys’ School and University College School, London;[3] followed by medical school at the University of Oxford (Exeter College and Merton College[3][5]) and at St Mary’s Hospital Medical School (now part of Imperial College London).Bannister was inspired by miler Sydney Wooderson’s remarkable comeback in 1945. Eight years after setting the mile record and seeing it surpassed during the war years by the great Swedish runners Arne Andersson and Gunder Hägg, Wooderson regained his old

form and challenged Andersson over the distance in several races. Wooderson lost to Andersson but set a British record of 4:04.2 in Gothenburg on 9 September.

Like Wooderson, Bannister would ultimately set a mile record, see it broken, and then set a new personal best slower than the new record.

Bannister started his running career at Oxford in the autumn of 1946 at the age of 17. He had never worn running spikes previously or run on a track. His training was light, even compared to the standards of the day, but he showed promise in running a mile in 1947 in 4:24.6 on only three weekly half-hour training sessions.

He was selected as an Olympic “possible” in 1948 but declined as he felt he was not ready to compete at that level. However, he was further inspired to become a great miler by watching the 1948 Olympics. He set his training goals on the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki.

In 1949, he improved in the 880 yards to 1:52.7 and won several mile races in 4:11. Then, after a period of six weeks with no training, he came in third at White City in 4:14.2.

The year 1950 saw more improvements as he finished a relatively slow 4:13 mile on 1 July with an impressive 57.5 last quarter. Then, he ran the AAA 880 in 1:52.1, losing to Arthur Wint, and then ran 1:50.7 for the 800 m at the European Championships on 26 August, placing third. Chastened by this lack of success, Bannister started to train harder and more seriously.

His increased attention to training paid quick dividends, as he won a mile race in 4:09.9 on 30 December. Then in 1951 at the Penn Relays, Bannister broke away from the pack with a 56.7 final lap, finishing in 4:08.3. Then, in his biggest test to date, he won a mile race on 14 July in 4:07.8 at the AAA Championships at White City before 47,000 people. The time set a meet record and he defeated defending champion Bill Nankeville in the process.

Bannister suffered defeat, however, when Yugoslavia’s Andrija Otenhajmer, aware of Bannister’s final-lap kick, took a 1500 m race in Belgrade 25 August out at near-record pace, forcing Bannister to close the gap by the bell lap. Otenhajmer won in 3:47.0, though Bannister set a personal best finishing second in 3:48.4. Bannister was no longer seen as invincible. One of his early conquests was the Geoffrey Sparrow, who later qualified as a dentist and worked in Mill Hill.

His training was a very modern individualised mixture of interval training influenced by coach Franz Stampfl with elements of block periodisation, fell running and anaerobic elements of training which were later perfected by Arthur Lydiard.Bannister avoided racing after the 1951 season until late in the spring of 1952, saving his energy for Helsinki and the Olympics. He ran an 880 on 28 May in 1:53.00, then a 4:10.6 mile time-trial on 7 June, proclaiming himself satisfied with the results. At the AAA championships, he skipped the mile and won the 880 in 1:51.5. Then, 10 days before the Olympic final, he ran a ¾ mile time trial in 2:52.9, which gave him confidence that he was ready for the Olympics as he considered the time to be the equivalent of a four-minute mile.

His confidence soon dissipated as it was announced there would be semifinals for the 1500 m (equal to 0.932 miles) at the Olympics, and he knew that this favoured runners who had much deeper training regimens than he did. When he ran his semifinal, Bannister finished fifth and thereby qualified for the final, but he felt “blown and unhappy.”

The 1500 m final on 26 July would prove to be one of the more dramatic in Olympic history. The race was not decided until the final metres, Josy Barthel of Luxembourg prevailing in an Olympic-record 3:45.28 (3:45.1 by official hand-timing) with the next seven runners all under the old record.Bannister finished fourth, out of the medals, but set a British record of 3:46.30 (3:46.0) in the process. After his relative failure at the 1952 Olympics, Bannister spent two months deciding whether to give up running. He set himself on a new goal: to be the first man to run a mile in under four minutes. Accordingly, he intensified his training and did hard intervals.

On 2 May 1953, he made an attempt on the British record at Oxford. Paced by Chris Chataway, Bannister ran 4:03.6, shattering Wooderson’s 1945 standard. “This race made me realise that the four-minute mile was not out of reach,” said Bannister.

On 27 June, a mile race was inserted into the programme of the Surrey schools athletic meeting. Australian runner Don Macmillan, ninth in the 1500 m at the 1952 Olympics, set a strong pace with 59.6 and 1:59.7 for two laps. He gave up after 2​1⁄2 laps, but Chris Brasher took up the pace. Brasher had jogged the race, allowing Bannister to lap him so he could be a fresh pace-setter. At ¾ mile, Bannister was at 3:01.8, the record—and first sub-four-minute mile—in reach. But the effort fell short with a finish in 4:02.0, a time bettered by only Andersson and Hägg. British officials would not allow this performance to stand as a British record, which, Bannister felt in retrospect, was a good decision. “My feeling as I look back is one of great relief that I did not run a four-minute mile under such artificial circumstances,” he said.

But other runners were making attempts at the four-minute barrier and coming close as well. American Wes Santee ran 4:02.4 on 5 June, the fourth-fastest mile ever. And at the end of the year, Australian John Landy ran 4:02.0.

Then early in 1954, Landy made some more attempts at the distance. On 21 January, he ran 4:02.4 in Melbourne, then 4:02.6 on 23 February, and at the end of the Australian season on 19 April he ran 4:02.6 again.

Bannister had been following Landy’s attempts and was certain his Australian rival would succeed with each one. But knowing that Landy’s season-closing attempt on 19 April would be his last until he travelled to Finland for another attempt, Bannister knew he had to make his attempt soon.This historic event took place on 6 May 1954 during a meet between British AAA and Oxford University at Iffley Road Track in Oxford, watched by about 3,000 spectators. With winds up to 25 miles per hour (40 km/h) before the event, Bannister had said twice that he favoured not running, to conserve his energy and efforts to break the 4-minute barrier; he would try again at another meet. However, the winds dropped just before the race was scheduled to begin, and Bannister did run.

The pace-setters from his major 1953 attempts, future Commonwealth Games gold medallist Chris Chataway from the 2 May attempt and future Olympic Games gold medallist Chris Brasher from the 27 June attempt, combined to provide pacing on this historic day. The racewas broadcast live by BBC Radio and commented on by 1924 Olympic 100 metres champion Harold Abrahams, of Chariots of Fire fame.

Bannister had begun his day at a hospital in London, where he sharpened his racing spikes and rubbed graphite on them so they would not pick up too much cinder ash. He took a mid-morning train from Paddington Station to Oxford, nervous about the rainy, windy conditions that afternoon.

Being a dual-meet format, there were seven men entered in the Mile: Alan Gordon, George Dole and Nigel Miller from Oxford University and four British AAA runners – Bannister, his two pacemakers Brasher and Chataway and Tom Hulatt. Nigel Miller arrived as a spectator and he only realised that he was due to run when he read the programme. Efforts to borrow a running kit failed and he could not take part, thus reducing the field to six.

The race went off as scheduled at 6:00 pm, and Brasher and Bannister went immediately to the lead. Brasher, wearing No. 44, led both the first lap in 58 seconds and the half-mile in 1:58, with Bannister (No. 41) tucked in behind, and Chataway (No. 42) a stride behind Bannister. Chataway moved to the front after the second lap and maintained the pace with a 3:01 split at the bell. Chataway continued to lead around the front turn until Bannister began his finishing kick with about 275 yards to go (just over a half-lap), running the last lap in just under 59 seconds.

The stadium announcer for the race was Norris McWhirter, who went on to co-publish and co-edit the Guinness Book of Records. He excited the crowd by delaying the announcement of the time Bannister ran as long as possible:

Ladies and gentlemen, here is the result of event nine, the one mile: first, number forty one, R. G. Bannister, Amateur Athletic Association and formerly of Exeter and Merton Colleges, Oxford, with a time which is a new meeting and track record, and which—subject to ratification—will be a new English Native, British National, All-Comers, European, British Empire and World Record. The time was three…

The roar of the crowd drowned out the rest of the announcement. Bannister’s time was 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds.

The claim that a four-minute mile was once thought to be impossible by informed observers was and is a widely propagated myth created by sportswriters and debunked by Bannister himself in his memoir, The Four Minute Mile (1955).

The reason the myth took hold was that four minutes was a round number which was slightly better (1.4 seconds) than the world record for nine years, longer than it probably otherwise would have been because of the effect of the Second World War in interrupting athletic progress in the combatant countries. The Swedish runners Gunder Hägg and Arne Andersson, in a series of head-to-head races in the period 1942–45, had already lowered the world mile record by five seconds to the pre-Bannister record. (See Mile run world record progression.) What is still impressive to knowledgeable track fans is that Bannister ran a four-minute mile on very low-mileage training by modern standards.

Just 46 days later, on 21 June in Turku, Finland, Bannister’s record was broken by his rival Landy with a time of 3 min 57.9 s, which the IAAF ratified as 3 min 58.0 s due to the rounding rules then in effect.Following his decision to retire from athletics and focus on medicine, Bannister spent forty years practising medicine.

In March 1957 he joined the Royal Army Medical Corps at Crookham, near at the start of two years of National Service, with the rank of Lieutenant.

He ultimately published more than 80 papers mostly concerned with the autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular physiology, and multiple system atrophy. He edited Autonomic Failure: A Textbook of Clinical Disorders of the Autonomic Nervous System with C.J. Mathias, a colleague at St Mary’s, as well as five editions of Brain and Bannister’s Clinical Neurology.

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Nanette Fabray (Born Ruby Bernadette Nanette Fabares; October 27, 1920 – February 22, 2018

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Nanette Fabray (born Ruby Bernadette Nanette Fabares; October 27, 1920 – February 22, 2018) was an American actress, singer and dancer. She began her career performing in vaudeville as a child and became a musical theatre actress during the 1940s and 1950s, winning a Tony Award in 1949 for her performance in Love Life. In the mid-1950s, she served as Sid Caesar’s comedic partner on Caesar’s Hour, for which she won three Emmy Awards, as well as co-starring with Fred Astaire in the film musical The Band Wagon. From 1979 to 1984, she appeared as Katherine Romano on the TV series One Day at a Time.

Fabray overcame a significant hearing impairment and was a long-time advocate for the rights of the deaf and hard-of-hearing. Her honors representing the handicapped include the President’s Distinguished Service Award and the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanitarian Award.

Fabray was born Ruby Bernadette Nanette Fabares on October 27, 1920, in San Diego, to Lily Agnes (McGovern), a housewife, and Raoul Bernard Fabares, a train conductor.The family resided in Los Angeles, and Fabray’s mother was instrumental in getting her daughter involved in show business as a child. At a young age, she studied tap dance with, among others, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson. She made her professional stage debut as “Miss New Years Eve 1923” at the Million Dollar Theater at the age of three. She spent much of her childhood appearing in vaudeville productions as a dancer and singer. She appeared with stars such as Ben Turpin.

Fabray’s parents divorced when she was nine, but they continued living together for financial reasons. During the Great Depression, her mother turned their home into a boarding house, which Fabray and her siblings helped run. In her early teenage years, Fabray attended the Max Reinhardt School of the Theatre on a scholarship. She then attended Hollywood High School, where she graduated in 1939. She entered Los Angeles Junior College in the fall of 1939 but withdrew a few months later. She had always had difficulty in school due to an undiagnosed hearing impairment, which made learning difficult. She eventually was diagnosed with a hearing loss in her twenties after an acting teacher encouraged her to get her hearing tested. Fabray said of the experience, “It was a revelation to me. All these years I had thought I was stupid, but in reality I just had a hearing problem.”

At the age of 19, Fabray made her feature film debut as one of Bette Davis’s ladies-in-waiting in The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939). She appeared in two additional motion pictures that year for Warner Bros., The Monroe Doctrine and A Child Is Born but was not signed to a long-term studio contract. She next appeared in the stage production Meet the People in Los Angeles in 1940, which then toured the United States in 1940–1941. In the show, she sang the opera aria “Caro nome” from Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto while tap dancing. During the show’s New York run, Fabray was invited to perform the “Caro nome” number for a benefit at Madison Square Garden with Eleanor Roosevelt as the main speaker. Ed Sullivan was the master of ceremonies for the event and the famed host, reading a cue card, mispronounced her name as “Nanette Fa-bare-ass.” After this embarrassing faux pas, the actress changed the spelling of her name from Fabares to Fabray.

Artur Rodziński, conductor of the New York Philharmonic, saw Fabray’s performance in Meet the People and offered to sponsor operatic vocal training for her at the Juilliard School. She studied opera at Juilliard with Lucia Dunham during the latter half of 1941 while performing in her first Broadway musical, Cole Porter’s Let’s Face It!, with Danny Kaye and Eve Arden. She decided that she preferred musical theatre over opera and withdrew from the school after five months. She became a successful musical theatre actress in New York during the 1940s and early 1950s, starring in such productions as By Jupiter (1942), My Dear Public (1943), Jackpot (1944), Bloomer Girl (1946), High Button Shoes (1947), Arms and the Girl (1950), and Make a Wish (1951). In 1949, she won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical for her portrayal of Susan Cooper in the Kurt Weill/Alan Jay Lerner musical Love Life. She received a Tony nomination for her role as Nell Henderson in 1963 for Mr. President 1963 after an eleven-year absence from the New York stage. Fabray continued to tour in musicals for many years, appearing in such shows as Wonderful Town and No, No, Nanette.

In the mid-1940s, Fabray worked regularly for NBC on a variety of programs in the Los Angeles area. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, she made her first high-profile national television appearances performing on a number of variety programs such as The Ed Sullivan Show, Texaco Star Theatre, and The Arthur Murray Party.

She also appeared on Your Show of Shows as a guest star opposite Sid Caesar. She appeared as a regular on Caesar’s Hour from 1954 to 1956, winning three Emmys. Fabray left the show after a misunderstanding when her business manager, unbeknownst to her, made unreasonable demands for her third season contract. Fabray and Caesar did not reconcile until years later.

In 1961, Fabray starred in 26 episodes of Westinghouse Playhouse, a half-hour sitcom series that also was known as The Nanette Fabray Show and Yes, Yes Nanette.

Fabray appeared as the mother of the main character on several television series such as One Day at a Time, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and Coach, where she played mother to real-life niece Shelley Fabares. Like her aunt, Shelley Fabares also appeared on One Day at a Time.

Fabray made 13 guest appearances on The Carol Burnett Show. She performed on multiple episodes of The Dean Martin Show, The Hollywood Palace, Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall and The Andy Williams Show. She was a panelist on 230 episodes of the long-running game show The Hollywood Squares as well as a mystery guest on What’s My Line?

She appeared in guest-starring acting roles on Burke’s Law, Love, American Style, Maude, The Love Boat and Murder, She Wrote. On the PBS program Pioneers of Television: Sitcoms, Mary Tyler Moore credited Fabray with inspiring her trademark comedic crying technique.

In 1953, Fabray played her best-known screen role as a Betty Comden-like playwright in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical The Band Wagon with Fred Astaire and Jack Buchanan. The film featured Fabray, Astaire, and Buchanan performing the classic musical number “Triplets”, which was included in That’s Entertainment, Part II. Additional film credits include The Subterraneans (1960), The Happy Ending (1969), Harper Valley PTA (1978), Amy (1981), and Teresa’s Tattoo (1994).

Fabray’s most recent work was in 2007, when she appeared in The Damsel Dialogues, an original revue by composer Dick DeBenedictis, with direction/choreography by Miriam Nelson. The show, which was performed at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks, California, focused on women’s issues with life, love, loss, and the workplace.Fabray’s first husband, David Tebet, was a vice president of NBC. Her second husband was screenwriter Ranald MacDougall, who numbered Mildred Pierce and Cleopatra among his credits, and who, in the early 1970s, served as president of the Writers Guild of America. The couple was married from 1957 until his death in 1973. They had one child: Jamie MacDougall.She was a resident of Pacific Palisades, California; and is the aunt of singer/actress Shelley Fabares. Her niece’s 1984 wedding to actor Mike Farrell was at her home. Fabray was associated with Ronald Reagan’s campaign for the governorship of California in 1966.

She was hospitalized for almost two weeks after being knocked unconscious by a falling pipe backstage during a broadcast of Caesar’s Hour in 1955.

In 2001, she wrote to advice columnist Dear Abby to decry the loud background music played on television programs.

Fabray died on February 22, 2018 at her home in Palos Verdes, California, at the age of 97.

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William Franklin Graham Jr. KBE – November 7, 1918 – February 21, 2018

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William Franklin Graham Jr. KBE (November 7, 1918 – February 21, 2018) was an American evangelical Christian evangelist and an ordained Southern Baptist minister who became well known internationally after 1949. He has been looked upon as one of the most influential preachers of the 20th century.He held large indoor and outdoor rallies with sermons that were broadcast on radio and television, some still being re-broadcast into the 21st century

In his six decades of television, Graham hosted annual Billy Graham Crusades, which ran from 1947 until his retirement in 2005. He also hosted the popular radio show Hour of Decision from 1950 to 1954. He repudiated racial segregation. In addition to his religious aims, he helped shape the worldview of a huge number of people who came from different backgrounds, leading them to find a relationship between the Bible and contemporary secular viewpoints. Graham preached to live audiences of nearly 215 million people in more than 185 countries and territories through various meetings, including BMS World Mission and Global Mission. He also reached hundreds of millions more through television, video, film, and webcasts.

Graham was a spiritual adviser to American presidents and provided spiritual counsel for every president from Harry Truman to Barack Obama. He was particularly close to Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson (one of Graham’s closest friends),and Richard Nixon. He insisted on racial integration for his revivals and crusades in 1953 and invited Martin Luther King Jr. to preach jointly at a revival in New York City in 1957. Graham bailed King out of jail in the 1960s when King was arrested during demonstrations. He was also lifelong friends with another televangelist, the founding pastor of the Crystal Cathedral, Robert H. Schuller, whom Graham talked into starting his own television ministry.

Graham operated a variety of media and publishing outlets. According to his staff, more than 3.2 million people have responded to the invitation at Billy Graham Crusades to “accept Jesus Christ as their personal savior”. As of 2008, Graham’s estimated lifetime audience, including radio and television broadcasts, topped 2.2 billion. Because of his crusades, Graham preached the gospel to more people in person than anyone in the history of Christianity.Graham was repeatedly on Gallup’s list of most admired men and women. He appeared on the list 60 times since 1955, more than any other individual in the world.Grant Wacker reports that by the mid-1960s, he had become the “Great Legitimator”.

William Franklin Graham Jr. was born on November 7, 1918, in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was was of Scots-Irish descent and was the eldest of four children born to Morrow (née Coffey) and William Franklin Graham Sr. Graham was raised on a family dairy farm with his two younger sisters and younger brother. When he was eight years old in 1927, the family moved about 75 yards (69 m) from their white frame house to a newly built red brick home.He was raised by his parents in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. Graham attended the Sharon Grammar School. He started to read books from an early age and loved to read novels for boys, especially Tarzan. Like Tarzan, he would hang on the trees and gave the popular Tarzan yell, scaring both horses and drivers. According to his father, that yelling had led him to become a minister. When he was fourteen in 1933, Prohibition ended in December, and Graham’s father forced him and his sister, Katherine, to drink beer until they got sick. This created such an aversion that Graham and his sister avoided alcohol and drugs for the rest of their lives.

Graham had been turned down for membership in a local youth group for being “too worldly” when Albert McMakin, who worked on the Graham farm, persuaded him to go and see the evangelist Mordecai Ham.According to his autobiography, Graham was converted in 1934, at age 16 during a series of revival meetings in Charlotte led by Ham.

After graduating from Sharon High School in May 1936, Graham attended Bob Jones College, then located in Cleveland, Tennessee. After one semester, he found it too legalistic in both coursework and rules. At this time he was influenced and inspired by Pastor Charley Young from Eastport Bible Church. He was almost expelled, but Bob Jones Sr. warned him not to throw his life away: “At best, all you could amount to would be a poor country Baptist preacher somewhere out in the sticks … You have a voice that pulls. God can use that voice of yours. He can use it mightily.”

In 1937 Graham transferred to the Florida Bible Institute in Temple Terrace, Florida, near Tampa. He preached his first sermon that year at Bostwick Baptist Church near Palatka, Florida, while still a student. In his autobiography, Graham wrote of receiving his “calling on the 18th green of the Temple Terrace Golf and Country Club”, which was adjacent to the Institute campus. Reverend Billy Graham Memorial Park was later established on the Hillsborough River, directly east of the 18th green and across from where Graham often paddled a canoe to a small island in the river, where he would preach to the birds, alligators, and cypress stumps. In 1939, Graham was ordained by a group of Southern Baptist clergymen at Peniel Baptist Church in Palatka, Florida. In 1943, Graham graduated from Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, with a degree in anthropology.

During his time at Wheaton, Graham decided to accept the Bible as the infallible word of God. Henrietta Mears of the First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood (Hollywood, California) was instrumental in helping Graham wrestle with the issue. He settled it at Forest Home Christian Camp (now called Forest Home Ministries) southeast of the Big Bear Lake area in southern California.A memorial there marks the site of Graham’s decision.

On August 13, 1943, Graham married Wheaton classmate Ruth Bell, whose parents were Presbyterian missionaries in China. Her father, L. Nelson Bell, was a general surgeon.Ruth Graham died on June 14, 2007, at the age of 87. The Grahams were married for almost 64 years.

Graham and his wife had five children together: Virginia Leftwich (Gigi) Graham (b. 1945), an inspirational speaker and author; Anne Graham Lotz (b. 1948), runs AnGeL ministries); Ruth Graham (b. 1950), founder and president of Ruth Graham & Friends, leads conferences throughout the U.S. and Canada; Franklin Graham (b. 1952), serves as president and CEO of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association and as president and CEO of international relief organization, Samaritan’s Purse;[28] and Nelson Edman Graham (b. 1958), a pastor who runs East Gates Ministries International,which distributes Christian literature in China.

Graham had 19 grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren. His grandson Tullian Tchividjian, son of Gigi, was the senior pastor of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Fort Lauderdale, Florida until he was defrocked in June 2015 after admitting to an extra-marital affair.Tchividjian later filed for divorce from his wife, Kim.Grandson Basyle “Boz” Tchividjian, a former child abuse chief prosecutor and professor at Liberty University School of Law, is the founder and executive director of Godly Response to Abuse in the Christian Environment, a nonprofit dedicated to preventing and responding to abuse in Christian organizations

While attending college, Graham became pastor of the United Gospel Tabernacle and also had other preaching engagements.

From 1943 to 1944, Graham briefly served as pastor of the First Baptist Church in Western Springs, Illinois, which was not far from Wheaton. While there, his friend Torrey Johnson, pastor of the Midwest Bible Church in Chicago, told Graham that his radio program, Songs in the Night, was about to be canceled due to lack of funding. Consulting with the members of his church in Western Springs, Graham decided to take over Johnson’s program with financial support from his congregation. Launching the new radio program on January 2, 1944, still called Songs in the Night, Graham recruited the bass-baritone George Beverly Shea as his director of radio ministry. While the radio ministry continued for many years, Graham decided to move on in early 1945. In 1947, at age 30, he was hired as president of Northwestern Bible College in Minneapolis – at the time, the youngest person to serve as a sitting president of any U.S. college or university. Graham served as the president from 1948 to 1952.

Graham initially intended to become a chaplain in the Armed Forces, but he contracted mumps shortly after applying for a commission. After a period of recuperation in Florida, he was hired as the first full-time evangelist of the new Youth for Christ (YFC), co-founded by Torrey Johnson and the Canadian evangelist Charles Templeton. Graham traveled throughout both the United States and Europe as a YFCI evangelist. Templeton applied to Princeton Theological Seminary for an advanced theological degree and urged Graham to do so as well, but he declined as he was already serving as the president of Northwestern Bible College.

Graham scheduled a series of revival meetings in Los Angeles in 1949, for which he erected circus tents in a parking lot.He attracted national media coverage, especially in the conservative Hearst chain, although Hearst and Graham never met.The crusade event ran for eight weeks – five weeks longer than planned. Graham became a national figure with heavy coverage from the wire services and national magazines.
Crusades
Main article: List of Billy Graham’s crusades
Graham speaking at a Crusade in Oslo, Norway, 1955

Since his ministry began in 1947, Graham conducted more than 400 crusades in 185 countries and territories on six continents. The first Billy Graham Crusade, held September 13–21, 1947, in the Civic Auditorium in Grand Rapids, Michigan, was attended by 6,000 people. Graham was 28 years old. He called them crusades, after the medieval Christian forces who conquered Jerusalem. He would rent a large venue, such as a stadium, park, or street. As the sessions became larger, he arranged a group of up to 5,000 people to sing in a choir. He would preach the gospel and invite people to come forward (a practice begun by Dwight L. Moody). Such people were called inquirers and were given the chance to speak one-on-one with a counselor, to clarify questions and pray together. The inquirers were often given a copy of the Gospel of John or a Bible study booklet. In Moscow, in 1992, one-quarter of the 155,000 people in Graham’s audience went forward at his call. During his crusades, he has frequently used the altar call song, “Just As I Am”.

Graham was offered a five-year, $1 million contract from NBC to appear on television opposite Arthur Godfrey, but he had prearranged commitments. He turned down the offer in order to continue his touring revivals. Graham had crusades in London, which lasted 12 weeks, and a New York City crusade in Madison Square Garden in 1957, which ran nightly for 16 weeks.
Student ministry

Graham spoke at InterVarsity Christian Fellowship’s Urbana Student Missions Conference at least nine times: in 1948, 1957, 1961, 1964, 1976, 1979, 1981, 1984, and 1987.

At each Urbana conference, he challenged the thousands of attendees to make a commitment to follow Jesus Christ for the rest of their lives. He often quoted a six-word phrase that was reportedly written in the Bible of William Whiting Borden, the son of a wealthy silver magnate: “No reserves, no retreat, no regrets”. Borden had died in Egypt on his way to the mission field.

Graham also held evangelistic meetings on a number of college campuses: at the University of Minnesota during InterVarsity’s “Year of Evangelism” in 1950–51, a 4-day mission at Yale University in 1957, and a week-long series of meetings at the University of North Carolina’s Carmichael Auditorium in September 1982.

In 1955 he was invited by students to lead the mission to Cambridge University, arranged by the CICCU, with the London pastor-theologian John Stott as his chief assistant. This invitation was greeted with much disapproval in the correspondence columns of The Times.
Evangelistic association

In 1950, Graham founded the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association (BGEA) with its headquarters in Minneapolis. The association relocated to Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1999. BGEA ministries have included:

Hour of Decision, a weekly radio program broadcast around the world for more than 50 years
Mission television specials broadcast in almost every market in the US and Canada
A syndicated newspaper column, My Answer, carried by newspapers across the United States and distributed by Tribune Media Services
Decision magazine, the official publication of the association
Christianity Today was started in 1956 with Carl F. H. Henry as its first editor
Passageway.org, the website for a youth discipleship program created by BGEA
World Wide Pictures, which has produced and distributed more than 130 films

In April 2013, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association started “My Hope With Billy Graham”, the largest outreach in its history, encouraging church members to spread the gospel in small group meetings after showing a video message by Graham. “The idea is for Christians to follow the example of the disciple Matthew in the New Testament and spread the gospel in their own homes.” The video, called “The Cross”, is the main program in the My Hope America series and was also broadcast the week of Graham’s 95th birthday. In an email interview with WorldNetDaily (WND), Graham wrote that “we are close to the end of the age”.
Civil rights movement

During a 1953 rally in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Graham tore down the ropes that organizers had erected in order to segregate the audience into racial sections. In his memoirs, he recounted that he told two ushers to leave the barriers down “or you can go on and have the revival without me.” He warned a white audience, “we have been proud and thought we were better than any other race, any other people. Ladies and gentlemen, we are going to stumble into hell because of our pride.”

In 1957, Graham’s stance towards integration became more publicly shown when he allowed black ministers Thomas Kilgore and Gardner Taylor to serve as members of his New York Crusade’s executive committee and invited the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whom he first met during the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955, to join him in the pulpit at his 16-week revival in New York City, where 2.3 million gathered at Madison Square Garden, Yankee Stadium, and Times Square to hear them.Graham recalled in his autobiography that during this time, he and King developed a close friendship and that he was eventually one of the few people who referred to King as “Mike,” a nickname which King asked only his closest friends to call him.Following King’s assassination in 1968, Graham mourned that the U.S. had lost “a social leader and a prophet”. In private, Graham advised King and other members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).

Despite their friendship, tensions between Graham and King emerged in 1958 when the sponsoring committee of a crusade which took place in San Antonio, Texas on July 25 arranged for Graham to be introduced by that state’s segregationist governor, Price Daniel. On July 23, King sent a letter to Graham and informed him that allowing Daniel to speak at a crusade which occurred the night before the state’s Democratic Primary “can well be interpreted as your endorsement of racial segregation and discrimination.”Graham’s advisor, Grady Wilson, replied to King that “even though we do not see eye to eye with him on every issue, we still love him in Christ.” Though Graham’s appearance with Daniel dashed King’s hopes of holding joint crusades with Graham in the Deep South, the two still remained friends and King told a Canadian television audience the following year that Graham had taken a “very strong stance against segregation.” Graham and King would also come to differ on the Vietnam War. Aft
er King’s “Beyond Vietnam” speech denouncing U.S. intervention in Vietnam, Graham castigated him and others for their criticism of U.S. foreign policy

By the middle of 1960, King and Graham traveled together to the Tenth Baptist World Congress of the Baptist World Alliance. In 1963, Graham posted bail for King to be released from jail during the Birmingham campaign.[51] Graham held integrated crusades in Birmingham, Alabama, on Easter 1964 in the aftermath of the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, and toured Alabama again in the wake of the violence that accompanied the first Selma to Montgomery march in 1965.

Graham’s faith prompted his maturing view of race and segregation; he told a member of the Ku Klux Klan that integration was necessary primarily for religious reasons: “There is no scriptural basis for segregation,” Graham argued. “The ground at the foot of the cross is level, and it touches my heart when I see whites standing shoulder to shoulder with blacks at the cross.”

Lausanne Movement

The friendship between Graham and John Stott led to a further partnership in the Lausanne Movement, of which Graham was founder. It built on Graham’s 1966 World Congress on Evangelism in Berlin.[clarification needed] In collaboration with Christianity Today, Graham convened what TIME magazine described as “a formidable forum, possibly the widest–ranging meeting of Christians ever held” with 2,700 participants from 150 nations gathering for the International Congress on World Evangelization. This took place in Lausanne, Switzerland (July 16–25, 1974), and the movement which ensued took its name from the host city. Its purpose was to strengthen the global church for world evangelization, and to engage ideological and sociological trends which bore on this.Graham invited Stott to be chief architect of the Lausanne Covenant, which issued from the Congress and which, according to Graham, “helped challenge and unite evangelical Christians in the great task of world evangelization.” The movement remains a significant fruit of Graham’s legacy, with a presence in nearly every nation.

Graham played multiple roles that reinforced each other. Grant Wacker identifies eight major roles he played: preacher, icon, Southerner, entrepreneur, architect (or bridge builder), pilgrim, pastor and finally his widely recognized status as America’s Protestant patriarch, on a par with Martin Luther King and Pope John Paul II.

Graham as bridge builder deliberately reached into the secular world. For example, as entrepreneur he built his own pavilion for the 1964 New York World’s Fair.He appeared as a guest on a 1969 Woody Allen television special, where he joined the comedian in a witty exchange on theological matters. During the Cold War, Graham-the-bridge-builder became the first evangelist of note to speak behind the Iron Curtain, addressing large crowds in countries throughout Eastern Europe and in the Soviet Union, calling for peace.During the apartheid era, Graham consistently refused to visit South Africa until its government allowed integrated seating for audiences. During his first crusade there in 1973, he openly denounced apartheid. Graham also corresponded with imprisoned South African leader Nelson Mandela during the latter’s 27-year imprisonment.
File:Billy Graham in het Feyenoord stadion.ogvPlay media
Billy Graham at the Feyenoord-stadion in Rotterdam, The Netherlands (June 30, 1955)

In 1984, he led a series of meetings in the United Kingdom summer, called Mission England, using outdoor football (soccer) grounds as venues.

Graham was interested in fostering evangelism around the world. In 1983, 1986 and 2000 he sponsored, organized and paid for massive training conferences for Christian evangelists from around the world; with the largest representations of nations ever held until that time. Over 157 nations were gathered in 2000 at the RAI Convention Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. At one revival in Seoul, South Korea, Graham attracted more than one million people to a single service.He appeared in China in 1988 – for Ruth, this was a homecoming, since she had been born in China to missionary parents. He appeared in North Korea in 1992.

On October 15, 1989, Graham received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Graham was the only minister, functioning in that capacity, to receive one.

On September 22, 1991, Graham held his largest event in North America on the Great Lawn of New York’s Central Park. City officials estimated more than 250,000 in attendance. In 1998, Graham spoke at TED (conference) to a crowd of scientists and philosophers.

On September 14, 2001, only three days after the World Trade Center attacks, Graham was invited to lead a service at Washington National Cathedral, which was attended by President George W. Bush and past and present leaders. He also spoke at the memorial service following the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. On June 24–26, 2005, Billy Graham began what he has said would be his last North American crusade, three days at the Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in New York City. But on the weekend of March 11–12, 2006, Billy Graham held the “Festival of Hope” with his son, Franklin Graham. The festival was held in New Orleans, which was recovering from Hurricane Katrina.

Graham prepared one last sermon, My Hope America, released on DVD and played around America and possibly worldwide between November 7–10, 2013, November 7 being his 95th birthday, hoping to cause a revival. It was aired on several networks, including Fox News

Graham said that his planned retirement was because of his failing health; he had suffered from hydrocephalus since 1992. In August 2005, Graham appeared at the groundbreaking for his library in Charlotte, North Carolina. Then 86, he used a walker during the ceremony. On July 9, 2006, he spoke at the Metro Maryland Franklin Graham Festival, held in Baltimore, Maryland, at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

In April 2010, Graham, at 91 and with substantial vision and hearing loss, made a rare public appearance at the re-dedication of the renovated Billy Graham Library.

There had been controversy over Graham’s proposed burial place; he announced in June 2007 that he and his wife would be buried alongside each other at the Billy Graham Library in his hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina. Graham’s younger son Ned had argued with older son Franklin about whether burial at a library would be appropriate. Ruth Graham had said that she wanted to be buried not in Charlotte but in the mountains near Asheville, North Carolina, where she had lived for many years; Ned supported his mother’s choice. Novelist Patricia Cornwell, a family friend, also opposed burial at the library, calling it a tourist attraction. Franklin wanted his parents to be buried at the library site. At the time of Ruth Graham’s death, it was announced that they would be buried at the library site.

Graham died on February 21, 2018, at his home in Montreat, North Carolina, at the age of 99. No cause of death was officially disclosed.On February 28 and March 1, 2018, Billy Graham will become the fourth private citizen in United States history to lie in honor in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.

After his close relationships with Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon, Graham tried to avoid explicit partisanship. Bailey says:

He declined to sign or endorse political statements, and he distanced himself from the Christian right…His early years of fierce opposition to communism gave way to pleas for military disarmament and attention to AIDS, poverty and environmental threats.

Graham was a registered member of the Democratic Party. In 1960 he was opposed to the candidacy of John F. Kennedy, fearing that because Kennedy was a Catholic, he would be bound to follow the Pope. Graham worked “behind the scenes” to encourage influential Protestant ministers to speak out against him. Graham met with a conference of Protestant ministers in Montreux, Switzerland, during the 1960 campaign, to discuss their mobilizing congregations to defeat Kennedy.According to the PBS Frontline program, God in America (2010), Episode 5, Graham also organized a meeting in September 1960 of hundreds of Protestant ministers in Washington, D.C. to this purpose; Norman Vincent Peale led the meeting. This was shortly before Kennedy’s speech on the separation of church and state in Houston, Texas, which was considered to be successful in meeting concerns of many voters. After his election, however, Kennedy invited Graham to play golf in Palm Beach, Florida, after which Graham acknowledged Kennedy’s election as an opportunity for Catholics and Protestants to come closer together. After they had discussed Jesus Christ at that meeting, the two remained in touch, meeting for the last time at a National Day of Prayer meeting in February 1963.In his autobiography, Graham claimed to have felt an “inner foreboding” in the week before Kennedy’s assassination, and to have tried to contact him to say, “Don’t go to Texas!

Graham leaned toward the Republicans during the presidency of Richard Nixon whom he had met and befriended as Vice President under Dwight Eisenhower.He did not completely ally himself with the later religious right, saying that Jesus did not have a political party. He gave his support to various political candidates over the years.

Graham refused to join Jerry Falwell’s Moral Majority in 1979, saying: “I’m for morality, but morality goes beyond sex to human freedom and social justice. We as clergy know so very little to speak with authority on the Panama Canal or superiority of armaments. Evangelists cannot be closely identified with any particular party or person. We have to stand in the middle in order to preach to all people, right and left. I haven’t been faithful to my own advice in the past. I will be in the future.”

According to a 2006 Newsweek interview, “For Graham, politics is a secondary to the Gospel … When Newsweek asked Graham whether ministers – whether they think of themselves as evangelists, pastors or a bit of both – should spend time engaged with politics, he replied: ‘You know, I think in a way that has to be up to the individual as he feels led of the Lord. A lot of things that I commented on years ago would not have been of the Lord, I’m sure, but I think you have some – like communism, or segregation, on which I think you have a responsibility to speak out.'”

In 2012, Graham publicly endorsed the Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney.Shortly after, apparently in order to accommodate Romney, who is a Mormon, references to Mormonism as a religious cult (“A cult is any group which teaches doctrines or beliefs that deviate from the biblical message of the Christian faith.”) were removed from Graham’s website.Observers have questioned whether the support of Republican and religious right politics on issues such as same-sex marriage coming from Graham – who stopped speaking in public or to reporters – in fact reflects the views of his son, Franklin, head of the BGEA. Franklin denied this, and said that he would continue to act as his father’s spokesperson rather than allowing press conferences.
Pastor to presidents
President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan greet Graham at the National Prayer Breakfast of 1981

Graham had a personal audience with many sitting US presidents, from Harry S. Truman to Barack Obama – 12 consecutive presidents. After meeting with Truman in 1950, Graham told the press he had urged the president to counter communism in North Korea. Truman disliked him and did not speak with him for years after that meeting. Later he always treated his conversations with presidents as confidential.
Graham in 1966

Graham became a regular visitor during the tenure of Dwight D. Eisenhower. He purportedly urged him to intervene with federal troops in the case of the Little Rock Nine to gain admission of black students to public schools.House Speaker Sam Rayburn convinced Congress to allow Graham to conduct the first religious service on the steps of the Capitol building in 1952.Eisenhower asked for Graham while on his deathbed.

Graham met and would become a close friend of Vice President Richard Nixon, and supported Nixon, a Quaker, for the 1960 presidential election. He convened an August strategy session of evangelical leaders in Montreaux, Switzerland, to plan how best to oppose Nixon’s Roman Catholic opponent, Senator John F. Kennedy. Though a registered Democrat, Graham also maintained firm support of aggression against the foreign threat of Communism and strongly sympathized with Nixon’s views regarding American foreign policy.Thus, he was more sympathetic to Republican administrations.

On December 16, 1963, US President Lyndon B. Johnson, who was impressed by the way Graham had praised the work of his great-grandfather Rev. George Washington Baines, invited Graham to the White House to give him spiritual counseling.[After this visit, Johnson frequently would call on Graham for more spiritual counseling as well as companionship.As Graham recalled to his biographer Frady, “I almost used the White House as a hotel when Johnson was President. He was always trying to keep me there. He just never wanted me to leave.”

In striking contrast with his more limited access with Truman, Eisenhower and Kennedy, Graham would not only visit the White House private quarters but would also at times kneel at Johnson’s bedside and then pray with him whenever the President requested him to do so.Graham once recalled “I have never had many people do that.” In addition to his White House visits, Graham would visit Johnson at Camp David and occasionally met with the President when he retreated to his private ranch in Stonewall, Texas.Johnson would also become the first sitting President to attend one of Graham’s crusades, which took place in Houston, Texas, in 1965.

During the 1964 US presidential election, supporters of Republican nominee Barry Goldwater sent an estimated 2 million telegrams to Graham’s hometown of Montreat, North Carolina, and sought the preacher’s endorsement.Supportive of Johnson’s domestic policies,and hoping to preserve his friendship with the President,Graham resisted pressure to endorse Goldwater and stayed neutral in the election.Following Johnson’s election victory, Graham’s role as the main White House pastor was solidified. At one point, Johnson even considered making Graham a member of his cabinet and grooming him to be his successor, though Graham insisted he had no political ambitions and wished to remain a preacher.Graham’s biographer David Aikman acknowledged that the preacher was closer to Johnson than any other President he had ever known.

He spent the last night of Johnson’s presidency in the White House, and he stayed for the first night of Nixon’s.After Nixon’s victorious 1968 presidential campaign, Graham became an adviser, regularly visiting the White House and leading the president’s private worship services. In a meeting they had with Golda Meir, Nixon offered Graham the ambassadorship to Israel, but he refused.
Billy Graham meeting with President Barack Obama in Montreat, April 2010

In 1970, Nixon appeared at a Graham revival in East Tennessee, which they thought safe politically. It drew one of the largest crowds in Tennessee and protesters against the Vietnam War. Nixon was the first president to give a speech from an evangelist’s platform. Their friendship became strained in 1973 when Graham rebuked Nixon for his post-Watergate behavior and the profanity heard on the Watergate tapes; they eventually reconciled after Nixon’s resignation.

Graham was criticized by some for being too attracted to the seat of political power. Graham officiated at one presidential burial and one presidential funeral. He presided over the graveside services of President Lyndon Johnson in 1973 and took part in eulogizing the former president. Graham officiated at the funeral services of former First Lady Pat Nixon in 1993, and the death and funeral of Richard Nixon in 1994. He was unable to attend the state funeral of Ronald Reagan on June 11, 2004, as he was recovering from hip replacement surgery.This was mentioned by George Bush in his eulogy.

On April 25, 2010, President Barack Obama visited Graham at his home in Montreat, North Carolina, where they “had a private prayer.”
Relationship with Queen Elizabeth II

Graham had a friendly relationship with Queen Elizabeth II and was frequently invited by the Royal Family to special events.They first met in 1955 and Graham preached at Windsor Chapel at the Queen’s invitation during the following year. Their friendly relationship may have been because they shared a traditional approach to the practical aspects of the Christian faith.
Foreign policy views

Graham was outspoken against communism and supported the American Cold War policy, including the Vietnam War. In a 1999 speech, Graham discussed his relationship with the late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung, praising him as a “different kind of communist” and “one of the great fighters for freedom in his country against the Japanese.” Graham went on to note that although he had never met Kim’s son and former North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, he had “exchanged gifts with him.”Graham gave a globe surmounted with doves to the North Korean Friendship Museum.

In 1982, Graham preached in the Soviet Union and attended a wreath-laying ceremony to honor the war dead of World War II, when the Soviets were American allies in the fight against Nazism. He voiced fear of a second holocaust, not against Jews, but “a nuclear holocaust” and advised that “our greatest contribution to world peace is to live with Christ every day.”

On March 12, 1991, Graham said in reference to the Persian Gulf War: “As … President Bush has said, it is not the people of Iraq we are at war with. It is some of the people in that regime. Pray for peace in the Middle East, a just peace.”Graham had earlier said that “there come times when we have to fight for peace.” He went on to say that out of the war in the Gulf may “come a new peace and, as suggested by the President, a new world order.”
During the Watergate affair, there were suggestions that Graham had agreed with many of President Richard Nixon’s antisemitic opinions, but he denied them and stressed his efforts to build bridges to the Jewish community. In 2002, the controversy was renewed when declassified “Richard Nixon tapes” confirmed remarks made by Graham to Nixon three decades earlier. Captured on the tapes, Graham agreed with Nixon that Jews control the American media, calling it a “stranglehold” during a 1972 conversation with Nixon, and suggesting that if Nixon was re-elected, they might be able to do something about it.

When the tapes were made public, Graham apologizedand said, “Although I have no memory of the occasion, I deeply regret comments I apparently made in an Oval Office conversation with President Nixon … some 30 years ago. … They do not reflect my views and I sincerely apologize for any offense caused by the remarks.” According to Newsweek magazine, “The shock of the revelation was magnified because of Graham’s longtime support of Israel and his refusal to join in calls for conversion of the Jews.”

In 2009, more Nixon tapes were released, in which Graham is heard in a 1973 conversation with Nixon referring to Jews and “the synagogue of Satan”. A spokesman for Graham said that Graham has never been an antisemite and that the comparison (in accord with the context of the quotation in the Book of Revelation) was directed specifically at those claiming to be Jews, but not holding to traditional Jewish values.

Graham was frequently honored by surveys, including “Greatest Living American” and consistently ranked among the most admired persons in the United States and the world. He appeared most frequently on Gallup’s list of most admired people. Since 1955, Graham was recognized by Gallup a record 55 times (49 times consecutively) – more than any other individual in history.

In 1967, he was the first Protestant to receive an honorary degree from Belmont Abbey College, a Roman Catholic school.

Graham received the Big Brother of the Year Award for his work on behalf of children. He has been cited by the George Washington Carver Memorial Institute for his contributions to race relations. He has received the Templeton Foundation Prize for Progress in Religion and the Sylvanus Thayer Award for his commitment to “Duty, Honor, Country”. The “Billy Graham Children’s Health Center” in Asheville is named after and funded by Graham.

For hosting many Christian musical artists, Graham was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 1999 by the Gospel Music Association.Singer Michael W. Smith is active in Billy Graham Crusades as well as Samaritan’s Purse.

In 1983, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Ronald Reagan.

In 2000, former First Lady Nancy Reagan presented the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award to Graham. Graham was a friend of the Reagans for years.

In 2001, Queen Elizabeth II awarded him an honorary knighthood. The honour was presented to him by Sir Christopher Meyer, British Ambassador to the U.S. at the British Embassy in Washington D.C. on December 6, 2001.

A professorial chair is named after him at the Alabama Baptist-affiliated Samford University, the Billy Graham Professor of Evangelism and Church Growth.[102] His alma mater Wheaton College has an archive of his papers at the Billy Graham Center. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary has the Billy Graham School of Missions, Evangelism and Ministry. Graham has received 20 honorary degrees and refused at least that many more. In San Francisco, California, the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium is sometimes erroneously called the “Billy Graham Civic Auditorium” and falsely considered to be named in his honor, but it is actually named after the rock and roll promoter Bill Graham.

On May 31, 2007, the $27 million Billy Graham Library was officially dedicated in Charlotte. Former presidents Jimmy Carter, George H. W. Bush, and Bill Clinton appeared to celebrate with Graham. A highway in Charlotte bears Graham’s name, as does I-240 near Graham’s home in Asheville.

The movie Billy: The Early Years premiered in theaters officially on October 10, 2008, less than one month before Graham’s 90th birthday. Graham didn’t comment on the film, but his son, Franklin released a critical statement on August 18, 2008, noting that the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association “has not collaborated with nor does it endorse the movie.”Graham’s eldest daughter Gigi praised the movie and has been hired as a consultant to help promote the film.

After his death in 2018, Billy Graham was afforded the privilege of lying in honor in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol building in Washington, D.C

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John Patsy Francona – November 4, 1933 – February 13, 2018

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John Patsy Francona (November 4, 1933 – February 13, 2018) was a Major League Baseball player. As a child, he was nicknamed “Tito” by his father.His son, Cleveland Indians manager Terry Francona, is also sometimes referred to as “Tito.” Francona originally signed with the St. Louis Browns in 1952. He spent two seasons in the Browns/Baltimore Orioles’ farm system (the franchise was relocated to Baltimore and renamed on September 29, 1953) before departing to serve in the U.S. Army for two years. Upon his return, he was invited to Spring training 1956 as a non-roster invitee, and made the club. He batted .258 with nine home runs and 57 runs batted in to finish tied with the Cleveland Indians’ Rocky Colavito for second place in American League Rookie of the Year balloting behind Chicago White Sox shortstop Luis Aparicio.

With Al Pilarcik’s acquisition during the off season, Francona lost his starting job in right field, and was demoted to the Pacific Coast League’s Vancouver Mounties early in the 1957 season. He returned with a vengeance, hitting two home runs in a game for the first time in his career on May 19 against the Kansas City Athletics, raising his season average to an even .300 in the process. He slipped into more of a reserve role from there. Used as a fourth outfielder and left-handed bat off the bench, Francona batted just .185 as a pinch hitter for the season. After which, he, Ray Moore and Billy Goodman were dealt to the Chicago White Sox for Larry Doby, Jack Harshman and Jim Marshall (Chicago later sent pitcher Russ Heman to Baltimore as part of this deal when it was discovered by the Orioles that Harshman was suffering from a slipped disc).

After a hot Spring, Francona won the White Sox starting right field job. His stay in Chicago was short, as he was dealt to the Detroit Tigers on the June 15 trade deadline. With Hall of Famer Al Kaline in right, Francona logged just 84 plate appearances over the remainder of the season. Dissatisfied with his lack of playing time, Francona demanded a trade. On March 21, 1959, he was traded to the Cleveland Indians for Larry Doby, the second trade involving the two. Regardless of his desire for more playing time, Francona began the 1959 season as a pinch hitter and utility man with his new franchise. After going five-for-nine with a home run in a June 7 doubleheader with the New York Yankees, Francona replaced Jim Piersall as Cleveland’s starting center fielder.Toward the end of the season, he was shifted to first base, with Indians regular first baseman Vic Power being shifted to second base. For the season, he batted .363 with a career high twenty home runs and 79 RBIs to help the Indians to an 89–65 rec

ord and second place in the American League. His .363 average would have led the league, however, he fell 34 at-bats short of the 3.1 per game necessary to qualify. The batting championship was awarded to the Detroit Tigers’ Harvey Kuenn, with a .353 batting average.

Francona was shifted to left field when the Indians acquired Kuenn for home run leader Rocky Colavito just prior to the start of the 1960 season.With Colavito gone, Francona was inserted in the clean-up spot in manager Joe Gordon’s batting order. After hitting only six home runs through the month of July, Francona was dropped to the number six spot in the batting order for August, and up to the number two spot in September. The moves helped, as he hit eleven home runs over the rest of the season to finish with seventeen. His 36 doubles led the American League.

On March 26, 1961, Francona hit a home run during a spring training exhibition game against the Boston Red Sox at Hi Corbett Field. When John C. Cota, a city parks employee, went to retrieve the ball, he discovered the body of Fred Victor Burden, who was wanted by Tucson, Arizona police in connection with the shooting death of former prize fighter James Cocio.

Francona was batting .293 with eleven home runs and 53 RBIs at the second All-Star break of the 1961 season to be named to the American League All-Star squad for the only time in his career. He did not, however, appear in the game. For the season, he batted .301 with sixteen home runs, 85 RBIs and lead American League Left Fielders in Fielding Percentage.

Despite having emerged as one of the better fielding left fielders in the league, Francona was shifted to first base during Spring training 1962 and finished the season leading the American League in Double Plays turned as a first baseman. He drew the ire of Boston sports fans at Fenway Park on June 11. With the game still scoreless, the Indians loaded the bases with two outs in the third inning. From first base, Francona yelled, “Hold it, Earl!” to Red Sox pitcher Earl Wilson. Francona’s distraction caused Wilson to half stumble off the mound and balk. Despite this being against baseball rules, Francona admitted after the game that he had indeed yelled to Wilson.

Francona slumped a little under new manager Mel McGaha in 1962. When Birdie Tebbetts grabbed the reins in 1963, Francona was moved back into left, but his numbers dipped even further. His .228 batting average was a career low, and his ten home runs and 41 RBIs were his fewest over a full season. He was, however, part of baseball history on July 31, when he hit the third in a series of four consecutive home runs in a single inning against pitcher Paul Foytack of the Los Angeles Angels. This was the second time in baseball history that a team hit four consecutive home runs in a single inning. It has happened three times since, including once by the Red Sox while his son, Terry Francona, was managing.

The Indians acquired All-Star Leon Wagner to play left field prior to the 1964 season, so Francona split time between right and first base. After the season, he was dealt to the St. Louis Cardinals for a player to be named later and cash. The World Series champions were already set in their corner outfield positions and at first base; Francona was acquired strictly to strengthen their bench. He batted .259 in 1965, including .265 as a pinch hitter. He remained a pinch hitter with the Cards through 1966. During Spring training 1967, his contract was sold to the Philadelphia Phillies.

Francona batted .205 with three RBIs filling in for an injured Bill White at first base for the Phillies.Upon his healthy return, Francona was sold to the Atlanta Braves. He enjoyed something of a resurgence in Atlanta, batting .248 with six home runs and 25 RBIs over the remainder of the 1967 season. In 1968, he logged 398 plate appearances, his most since 1963, and batted .296 with 47 RBIs, his most since 1962.

Francona was batting .339 with fourteen RBIs in semi-regular action in 1969 before a dislocated thumb halted his season. He returned healthy toward the end of June, but batted just .219 with one home run and eight RBIs in his return before his contract was sold to the Oakland A’s on August 22. He returned to his hitting ways, batting .341 with three home runs and twenty RBIs over the rest of the season. He split the 1970 season between the A’s and Milwaukee Brewers before retiring. Francona was the director of parks and recreation in New Brighton, Pennsylvania until retiring in 1997.He remained in New Brighton until his death at his home on February 13th, 2018.

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Morton David Alpern – March 23, 1922 – February 12, 2018

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Morton David Alpern (March 23, 1922 – February 12, 2018), better known as Marty Allen, was an American comedian, actor, and philanthropist. He worked as a comedy headliner in nightclubs, as a dramatic actor in television roles, and was once called “The Darling of Daytime TV”. He also appeared in films, notably the 1966 spy comedy The Last of the Secret Agents? During his comedy career, Allen also toured military hospitals, performed for veterans, and for active military personnel.

Allen was also a philanthropist. He contributed to the American Cancer Society, The Heart Fund, the March of Dimes, Fight for Sight, and served on the board of the Epilepsy Foundation. Allen was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Jewish parents; Louis Alpern (1898–1977; from Romania/Russia), a restaurant and bar ownerand his wife, the former Elsie Moss (1901–1979). He graduated from Taylor Allderdice High School in 1940. He was inducted into their alumni Hall Of Fame in 2009.

Allen joined the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He was stationed in Italy where he attained the rank of sergeant. He earned a Soldier’s Medal for stopping a fire in a plane that was being refueled. He saved the lives of the men boarding the burning plane by driving the fuel truck away, returning on foot to the plane, and then putting out the fire by rolling over the flames with his body in uniform. His heroism earned him a full-dress parade.

He was married to the former Lorraine “Frenchy” Trydelle, who was the reservation and office manager of the Concord Resort Hotel in the Catskills, from 1960 until her death in 1976. During the early to the mid-1950s, Allen and his first comedy partner, Mitch DeWood, worked as an opening act for stars including Sarah Vaughan, Eydie Gormé, and Nat King Cole. Allen and DeWood also worked many clubs, including the Copacabana until they broke up in 1958 and went their separate ways.

He then became part of the comedy team of Allen & Rossi with Steve Rossi, which resulted in a string of hit comedy albums, 44 appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show (including the famous appearance by The Beatles on 16 February 1964,during which Allen won over the Beatles fans in the audience by announcing “I’m Ringo’s mother!”), and the film The Last of the Secret Agents? (1966).They worked together from 1957 to 1968, parted ways amicably, and reunited for shows from the 1970s through the 1990s.

In 1961 and 1962, Allen appeared on Broadway in Let It Ride! at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre and then went on to perform in the pre-Broadway tour and Broadway performances of I Had a Ball in 1964.

He eventually began performing dramatic roles. His debut as a serious actor came on The Big Valley television series as the hapless Waldo Diefendorfer. Throughout the 1970s and into the 1980s, he made hundreds of television appearances, becoming a regular on The Hollywood Squares. He appeared on Circus of the Stars, in a cameo on The Super Mario Bros. Super Show!, on game shows such as Password, and in ten made-for-television movies. He also appeared in theatrical films such as The Great Waltz (1972), Harrad Summer (1974) and A Whale of a Tale (1976).

From the 1980s he and his wife, singer-songwriter Karon Kate Blackwell, teamed up to perform their musical comedy act to audiences around the country. In 2007, the duo began performing at the Gold Coast Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas and went on to perform at the Southpoint Casino, at Palace Station, and on cruise ships.In 2015, the couple continued to perform in venues around the country to overflow crowds, at the Rampart Casino and the Downtown Grand in Las Vegas. In 2016, they performed at the Metropolitan Room in New York City.

In 1968, he made a “Hello Dere” tour of military hospitals in the United States (a tour named after a catchphrase he popularized). He repeated the tour annually until 1972. During the tours, he talked with and entertained wounded soldiers who had just returned from Vietnam. He was also involved in a number of charitable causes including the American Cancer Society, The Heart Fund, March of Dimes, Fight for Sight, Cerebral Palsy, and was on the board of the Epilepsy Foundation. Allen died at the age of 95 on February 12, 2018, of complications from pneumonia at his home in Las Vegas. His wife and performing partner Karon Kate Blackwell was by his side.

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Vic Damone June 12, 1928 – February 11, 2018

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Vic Damone (June 12, 1928 – February 11, 2018) was an American traditional pop and big band singer, actor, radio and television presenter, and entertainer. He is best known for his performances of songs such as the number one hit “You’re Breaking My Heart”, and “On the Street Where You Live” (from My Fair Lady) and “My Heart Cries for You” which were both the number four hits.Damone was born Vito Rocco Farinola in Brooklyn, New York, to Rocco and Mamie (Damone) Farinola, Italian emigrants from Bari, Italy. His father was an electrician and his mother taught piano. His cousin was the actress and singer Doretta Morrow. Inspired by his favorite singer, Frank Sinatra, Damone began taking voice lessons. He sang in the choir at St. Finbar’s Church in Bath Beach, Brooklyn, for Sunday Mass under organist Anthony Amorello.

When his father was injured at work, Damone had to drop out of high school. He worked as an usher and elevator operator in the Paramount Theater in Manhattan.He met Perry Como while at the Paramount Theater. Damone stopped the elevator between floors, sang for him, and asked his advice if he should continue voice lessons. Impressed, Como said, “Keep singing!” and referred him to a local bandleader. Vito Farinola decided to call himself Vic Damone, using his mother’s maiden name.Damone entered the talent search on Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts and won in April 1947. This led to his becoming a regular on Godfrey’s show. He met Milton Berle at the studio and Berle got him work at two night clubs. By mid-1947, Damone had signed a contract with Mercury Records.

His first release, “I Have But One Heart”, reached number seven on the Billboard chart. “You Do” (released November 1) reached the same peak. These were followed by a number of other hits. In 1948, he got his own weekly radio show, Saturday Night Serenade.

He was booked into the Mocambo nightclub on the Sunset Strip in 1949, residing briefly at the Strip’s famed Garden of Allah Hotel.In April of 1949 he made his television debut on The Morey Amsterdam Show performing Cole Porter’s So in Love. In January of 1950 he made his first of several guest appearances on Ed Sullivan’s Toast of the Town, including a duet, the first of many, with vocalist and future TV hostess Dinah Shore. Over the next thirty years he became a regular featured guest performer on every major variety series on network television. Among the programs on which he appeared are The All Star Revue, The Texaco Star Theatre with Milton Berle, The Arthur Murray Party, What’s My Line?, The Jackie Gleason Show, The Steve Allen Show, The Perry Como Show, The Bell Telephone Hour, The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, The Garry Moore Show, I’ve Got a Secret, The Jack Paar Program, The Red Skelton Show, The Andy Williams Show, The Hollywood Palace, The Dean Martin Show, Hullabaloo, Mickie Finn’s, The Danny Thomas Ho

ur, The Jonathan Winters Show, The Carol Burnett Show, Della, Playboy After Dark, The Joey Bishop Show, Jimmy Durante Presents the Lennon Sisters, Dinah!, The Mike Douglas Show, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and several Bob Hope television specials.

In 1951, Damone appeared in two movies, The Strip, where he played himself, and Rich, Young and Pretty. From 1951 to 1953, he served in the United States Army, but before going into the service, he recorded a number of songs that were released during that time. He served with future Northwest Indiana radio personality Al Evans, and country music star Johnny Cash. After leaving the service, he married the Italian actress Pier Angeli (Anna Maria Pierangeli), and in 1954, made two more movies, Deep in My Heart and Athena.

In 1955, Damone had one song on the charts, “Por Favor”, which did not make it above number 73. However, he did have major roles in two movie musicals, Hit the Deck and Kismet. In early 1956, he moved from Mercury to Columbia Records, and had some success on that label with hits such as “On the Street Where You Live” (from My Fair Lady, his final pop top 10) and “An Affair to Remember” (from the movie of the same name). His six original, long-playing albums on Columbia between 1957 and 1961 were That Towering Feeling, Angela Mia, Closer Than a Kiss, This Game of Love, On the Swingin’ Side, and Young and Lively.

Damone with composer Harold Arlen and Peggy Lee, 1961

In 1961, he was released by Columbia. Moving over to Capitol Records, he filled the gap left by Frank Sinatra’s leaving to help found Reprise Records. He lasted at Capitol only until 1965; however, he recorded some of his most highly regarded albums there, including two which made the Billboard chart, Linger Awhile with Vic Damone and The Lively Ones, the latter with arrangements by Billy May, who also arranged another of Damone’s Capitol albums, Strange Enchantment. Other original Capitol albums included My Baby Loves to Swing, The Liveliest, and On the Street Where You Live.

Damone did limited acting on television in the early 1960s. He played Stan Skylar in the 1960 episode “Piano Man” of CBS’s The DuPont Show with June Allyson. He was cast as Jess Wilkerson in the 1961 episode “The Proxy” of the ABC Western series The Rebel, starring Nick Adams. He played the crooner Ric Vallone in the 1962 episode “Like a Sister” of the CBS sitcom The Dick Van Dyke Show. In the summers of 1962 and 1963, Damone hosted a television variety series on NBC called The Lively Ones, which showcased current jazz, pop, and folk performers, as well as comedians. His distinguished group of musical guests over two seasons included Count Basie, Louie Bellson, Dave Brubeck, Chris Connor, Matt Dennis, Frances Faye, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Buddy Greco, Woody Herman, Jack Jones, Stan Kenton, Gene Krupa, Peggy Lee, Nellie Lutcher, Shelly Manne, Anita O’Day, Ruth Olay, Oscar Peterson, André Previn, Della Reese, Shorty Rogers, Cal Tjader, and Joe Williams.

Damone’s other notable television work during this time included three guest appearances from 1963 to 1964 on CBS’s The Judy Garland Show. He also guested on UK television, inter alia, on Tommy Cooper’s Christmas. In addition to his solo performances, Garland and he sang duet medleys of songs from Porgy and Bess, West Side Story and Kismet.

In 1964, he sang “Back Home Again in Indiana” before the Indianapolis 500 car race.

In 1965, Damone next moved to Warner Bros. Records with the albums You Were Only Fooling and Country Love Songs. On Warner Bros., he had one top 100 chart hit: “You Were Only Fooling (While I Was Falling In Love)”. The next year, he switched record labels again, moving to RCA Victor and releasing the albums Stay with Me, Why Can’t I Walk Away, On the South Side of Chicago, and The Damone Type of Thing. In 1967, Damone hosted The Dean Martin Summer Show, which was rerun in 1971. In 1969, he released his last US chart record, a cover of the 1966 song “To Make A Big Man Cry”, which made the Billboard Easy Listening chart.

Also in 1965, he appeared on the Firestone album series, Your Favorite Christmas Music, Volume 4, singing “It Came Upon A Midnight Clear” and “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas”.In 1971, Damone started playing Las Vegas casinos as a performer, and although he had to declare bankruptcy in the early 1970s, he earned enough as a casino performer to clear up his financial difficulties. He extended his geographical range, touring through the United States and the United Kingdom, and as a result of his popularity, decided to record some albums again for RCA. In the UK, he appeared on Tommy Cooper’s Christmas Special television show in 1974.

In 1972, he was offered the role of Johnny Fontane in The Godfather. The role ultimately went to Al Martino, as Damone turned down the role for a variety of reasons, reportedly including him not thinking the role had enough screen time or paid enough, but also due to a fear of provoking the mob and Frank Sinatra, whom Damone profoundly respected.

Damone appeared in a Diet Pepsi commercial first aired during Super Bowl XXV in January 1991. Damone and other stars, including Jerry Lewis, Tiny Tim, Charo and Bo Jackson, attempt to sing Diet Pepsi’s theme song, “You’ve Got the Right One Baby (Uh-Huh)”, which was performed by Ray Charles.

His final album was issued in 2002, with other albums being repackaged and re-released. In 2003, Vic decided to release some previously unreleased material and formed Vintage Records with his son, Perry Damone. He planned to release a 7 CD series called: The Vic Damone Signature Collection, and in May, 2003 Released Volume 1, produced by his son, Perry Damone and Frank Sinclair. In May, 2004, Vic released his second CD in the Signature Series, also produced by his son Perry and Frank Sinclair, and decided to limit the collection to the two CD’s released. He recorded over 2,000 songs over his entire career. He garnered new fans following the launch of the Vic Damone website in 2002 www.vicdamone.com, created by his son, Perry Damone, and long time friend, Frank Sinclair, and ultimately managed by his son-in-law William “Bill” Karant.

One of his final public performances was on January 19, 2002, at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in Palm Beach, Florida. Damone suffered a stroke the same year and subsequently retired. Damone did, however, step out of retirement on January 22, 2011, when he once again performed at the Kravis Performing Arts Center in Palm Beach, to a sold-out crowd. Damone dedicated this performance to his six grandchildren, who had never seen him perform.Damone stated that “I don’t need the money … But, you know, my six grandkids have never seen me on stage. It will be the first time. I will introduce them. It’s going to be exciting for me. Before I die, I want them to have heard me perform at least once”.

In Brett Ratner’s movie Money Talks, Chris Tucker’s character sees a commercial about Vic Damone and then pretends to be Damone’s son. At the time, Vic’s real-life son, Perry, had some laughs about that “15 minutes of fame,” and made mention of it on his midday radio show on Phoenix radio station KEZ.

On June 12, 2009, Vic Damone released his autobiography titled Singing Was the Easy Part from St. Martin’s Press.

In 2010, Damone called Canadian crooner Michael Bublé talented but “cocky” and criticized him for smoking and drinking “straight alcohol” after a show, believing that it would damage his vocal cords. Bublé responded by saying that he knew what he was doing, but promising that he from now on would always mix his alcohol with soda or orange juice.

In December 2, 2011, at the age of 83, Damone launched an official Facebook profile dedicated to his fans. In addition to posting recent photos, Damone wrote that besides spending time with his family, he spends his retirement enjoying golf and football.Damone suffered a stroke in 2002 and another health scare in 2008. He recovered from both, and lived until 2018.Damone was married five times and divorced four:

Pier Angeli (1954–1958), actress, singer (one son, Perry Damone 1955–2014)
Judith Rawlins (1963–1971) (three daughters — Victoria, Andrea, and Daniella)
Becky Ann Jones (1974–1982), entertainer
Diahann Carroll (1987–1996), actress, singer
Rena Rowan-Damone (1998–2016) (her death), fashion designer, businessperson, philanthropist

Damone had six grandchildren from his daughters (Tate, Paige, Sloane, Rocco, Daniella, Grant).

Damone’s first wife, Pier Angeli, was previously in a well-publicized relationship with James Dean, but left him to marry Damone, a move that garnered great media attention.Six years after divorcing Angeli, Damone was arrested on October 15, 1964 on Angeli’s charge that he had kidnapped their 9‐year‐old son Perry (named for Perry Como) from New York to Los Angeles. He was released three hours later after having pled “not guilty” to being a fugitive from a kidnapping charge. At the same time, a Santa Monica, California judge awarded him custody of Perry.However, Angeli would ultimately gain custody of Perry and left Hollywood for her native Italy, taking Perry with her. Perry would however return to California after Angeli’s death. Perry died of lymphoma aged 59, on December 9, 2014.

Damone was raised Roman Catholic and served as an altar boy, claiming to have never found deep meaning in his original faith. In the late 1950s, he was introduced to the Bahá’í Faith by a drummer in his band. Damone said his rendition of “On the Street Where You Live” incorporates gestures meant to summon a sustaining vitality from `Abdu’l-Bahá. He officially joined the religion in the early 1960s.

Damone met his Polish-born wife Rena Rowan (born Irena Aurelia Jung on January 4, 1928 in Lida, then part of Poland) in 1996, after she asked him to perform at an event to raise money for her Rowan House charity in Philadelphia, which provides housing for homeless single women with children. Rowan, a breast-cancer survivor, was a clothing distributor who started the “Jones” New York clothing store chain in the mid-1970s.

Damone lived in Palm Beach County, Florida in his later years. In January 2015, Damone and Rena sold their La Casita home, landmarked at 200 Via Bellaria, for $5.75 million. Damone and Rena moved to a smaller residence, a townhouse in the Sloans Curve Drive neighborhood of Palm Beach. She suffered a stroke in 2011. In 2013, Damone was involved in a tug-of-war in a Palm Beach County court with Rowan’s two daughters, Nina and Lisa Rowan, for control over the destiny of Rowan and her fortune, which was reportedly worth more than $50 million. The court ultimately sided with Damone, ruling that Rena Rowan was capable of making her own decisions. Rowan died on November 6, 2016 at home in Palm Beach, Florida, from complications of pneumonia. She was 88.

Damone was a personal friend of Donald Trump. In May 2016, Trump offered to be a character witness on Damone’s behalf in the event of any legal action his step-daughters might take to prevent him from receiving any of his then ill wife’s estate, with an estimated worth of $900 million.

Damone died on February 11, 2018 from complications of respiratory illness at the age of 89.In his 2009 autobiography, Singing Was the Easy Part, Damone claimed he had been held dangling out of a window of a New York hotel by a “thug”. Damone claimed he had been engaged to the thug’s daughter, but ended the relationship when she insulted Damone’s mother. He wrote that his life was spared when, during a Mafia meeting to determine the singer’s fate, New York mob boss Frank Costello ruled in Damone’s favor.

In a 2015 interview, his daughter Victoria recalled an incident in the late 1960s or early 1970s, in which a “bookie” showed up and said Damone owed him a large amount of money. Damone phoned Frank Sinatra and asked him to intervene. Sinatra ultimately showed up, but the bookie showed Sinatra a “secret sign”, which Sinatra recognized and rendered him unable to intervene. Damone consequently had to relent and pay the bookie.In 1997, Damone received his high school diploma from Lafayette High School in Brooklyn when officials with the school granted credits for life experience and asked him to give the commencement address – advising students to “Have spiritual guidance. Don’t lose God. There is a God. Trust me.”

In 1997, Damone received the Sammy Cahn Lifetime Achievement Award from the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Frank Sinatra said that Damone had “the best set of pipes in the business.”

For his contribution to the recording industry, Damone has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1731 Vine Street in Los Angeles, California.

In 2014, Damone received the Society for the Preservation of the Great American Songbook’s first Legend Award in recognition of those who have made a significant contribution to the genre

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Wallace Wade Moon – April 3, 1930 – February 9, 2018

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Wallace Wade Moon -(April 3, 1930 – February 9, 2018) was an American professional baseball outfielder in Major League Baseball. Moon played his 12-year career in the major leagues for the St. Louis Cardinals (1954–58) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1959–65). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

Moon was the 1954 National League Rookie of the Year. He was an All-Star for two seasons and a Gold Glove winner one season. Moon batted .295 or more for seven seasons. He led the National League in triples in 1959 and in fielding percentage as left fielder in 1960 and 1961.

Moon was a 3-time World Series champion with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1959, 1963, and 1965. Moon was named after Wallace Wade, a former college football coach at the University of Alabama and Duke University. From a family of educators, he earned a master’s degree in administrative education from Texas A&M University in College Station while he was still in the minor leagues. He coached from 1953 to 1954 at Lake City, also in Craighead County, Arkansas.In the spring of 1954, the Cardinals told Moon to report to their minor league spring training camp. He ignored the order and reported instead to St. Petersburg with the Cardinals. He said that he would make the team or quit baseball. They let him stay, and by the end of the spring training he replaced Enos Slaughter in the outfield. To make room for him on the roster, St. Louis sent Slaughter to the New York Yankees.

Moon made his major league debut on April 13, 1954. In his first at-bat, despite chants of “We want Slaughter”, he belted a home run against the Chicago Cubs; in the same game Tom Alston became the first African American to play for the Cardinals. Moon finished his rookie season with a .304 batting average, 12 home runs, 76 runs batted in, and career-high numbers in runs (106), hits (193), doubles (29), and stolen bases (18) in 151 games. He earned both the MLB Rookie of the Year and The Sporting News Rookie of the Year honors. Almost a unanimous vote, Moon won easily over Ernie Banks, Gene Conley and Hank Aaron.

A fine left fielder with a good arm, Moon also played right field and center as well as first base. He hit a career-high 24 homers in 1957, and made the All-Star team in 1957 and 1959 (two games were played). Twice in his career, Moon compiled double figures in doubles, triples, home runs and stolen bases: 22, 11, 16, 12 in 1956, and 26, 11, 19, 15 in 1959, his first year with the Dodgers.

After the 1958 season, the Cardinals traded Moon to the Dodgers for outfielder Gino Cimoli. Both players were coming off years when they batted below .250; the Cardinals also sent pitcher Phil Paine, who never played for the Dodgers. Moon was initially concerned about batting in the converted Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum because right field was 440 feet away, making it difficult for a left-handed batter. However, the left field seats were only 251 feet away, protected by a 42-foot high screen. After consulting with friend and mentor Stan Musial, Moon adjusted his batting stance to emphasize hitting to left. The results were very successful. In his first season with the Dodgers, the team won the World Championship. Moon provided support in the lineup for Duke Snider, Gil Hodges and Don Demeter. He gained quick public acclaim in 1959 for the “Moon shots” that he hit over the high left field screen. Moon hit a home run in the sixth and final game of that World Series, which the Dodgers won over the Chicago Whit

He Sox. He also caught Luis Aparicio’s fly ball for the final out of the Series.

Moon was a Gold Glove Award winner for left field in 1960 leading National League left fielders in assists, double plays, and fielding percentage. He had another good season in 1961, batting .328 with 17 home runs and 88 runs batted in while leading National League left fielders in fielding percentage.

A career .289 hitter, Moon hit 142 home runs with 661 runs batted in during 1457 games, with a .371 on-base percentage and a .445 slugging average for a combined .816 on-base plus slugging percentage. He also scored the last run ever in the Coliseum.He retired as a player after the 1965 season. In 1969, Moon was a batting coach for the San Diego Padres, joining manager Preston Gómez and pitching coach and former teammate Roger Craig.

Moon went on to become athletic director and baseball coach at John Brown University, and a coach and minor league manager and owner of the San Antonio Dodgers for four years beginning in the late 1970s. Moon moved to Bryan, Texas, where he lived for over 25 years. He retired in 1998. He was married to Bettye and had five children and seven grandchildren.

Moon is featured on many websites featuring baseball cards, as he sported a prominent unibrow.

The January 27, 1960 episode (“The Larry Hanify Story”) of the popular TV western Wagon Train featured Moon in a brief role. The end credits included: “And Introducing Wally Moon as Sheriff Bender.” There was no baseball tie-in with his character, but the sheriff was hit by a bullet during a shoot-out with Tommy Sands’ bad guy.

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John Gavin – April 8, 1931 – February 9, 2018

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John Gavin (April 8, 1931 – February 9, 2018) was an American actor who was the United States Ambassador to Mexico (1981–86) and the President of the Screen Actors Guild (1971–73). He was best known for his performances in the films Imitation of Life (1959), Spartacus (1960), Psycho (1960), and Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967), playing leading roles in a series of films for producer Ross Hunter.Early life

Born Juan Vincent Apablasa Jr., Gavin was of Mexican, Chilean and Spanish descent, and was fluent in Spanish. His father, Juan Vincent Apablasa Sr., was of Chilean origin, and his paternal ancestors, including Cayetano Apablasa, were early landowners in California when it was still under Spanish rule. Gavin’s mother, Delia Diana Pablos, hailed from the historically influential Pablos family of the Mexican state of Sonora. Roughly two years after Gavin’s birth, his mother obtained a divorce from Apablasa. Her next marriage was to Herald Ray Golenor, who adopted John and changed his name to John Anthony Golenor.

After attending St. John’s Military Academy in Los Angeles and Villanova Prep (Ojai, California), both Catholic schools, he earned a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Latin American Affairs from Stanford University, where he did Senior Honors work in Latin American economic history and was a member of Chi Psi Fraternity and Navy ROTC. “I never did any acting in school, never had any curiosity about college plays”, he later said. “My entire thought moved in quite another direction.”

During the Korean War, Gavin was commissioned in the U.S. Navy serving aboard the USS Princeton offshore Korea where he served as an air intelligence officer from 1951 until the end of the war in 1953. Due to Gavin’s fluency in both Spanish and Portuguese, he was assigned as Flag Lieutenant to Admiral Milton E. Miles until he completed his four-year tour of duty in 1955.

He received an award due to his work in the Honduras floods of 1954.

Some people have inferred from what I said in the past I’m a rich boy, which I’m not, and that I’m doing this for a lark… Apparently you’re either born in abject poverty and rise above it or else you’re enormously wealthy. The fact that I went to a nice prep school and Stanford University has something to do with it… I went on a scholarship. I have been on my own ever since I got commissioned in the Navy. I never came into an estate or anything like that.

Following his naval service Gavin offered himself as a technical adviser to family friend, film producer Bryan Foy, who was making a movie about the Princeton. Instead, Foy arranged a screen test with Universal-International. Gavin originally turned down the offer – he had never acted in college – but his father urged him to try it. The test was successful and Gavin signed with the studio. “They offered me so much money I couldn’t resist”, he said later.

Universal groomed Gavin as a virile, strapping, handsome leading man in the mould of Rock Hudson. They gave him roles in the films Behind the High Wall (1956), Four Girls in Town (1957), and Quantez (also 1957). He was meant to star in The Female Animal (1958) but was too busy on other projects and was replaced by George Nader.

Gavin later remembered, “When I started out in front of the cameras I was green – raw, scared and just plain awful”.

Gavin’s first big break was being given the lead in A Time to Love and a Time to Die (1958), directed by Douglas Sirk from the novel by Erich Maria Remarque. This drew comparisons with the casting of the similarly-inexperienced Lew Ayres in Universal’s film version of All Quiet on the Western Front (1931).

“I felt that, after extensive tests, that he could be just right because of his lack of experience”, said director Douglas Sirk. “He was fresh, young, good looking, not pretty though, earnest – and had this little dilettante quality I figured would be quite the thing for the lead in this picture”.

“I think we have a good man”, said Remarque of Gavin’s casting. Universal executive Al Daff called Gavin “the greatest prospect I’ve seen in years”. “It changed my entire life”, said Gavin, who then went on to add: “If I should have the good fortune to become a star, I certainly don’t intend to become a star twenty-four hours a day.”

Universal was so excited about Gavin, they sent a copy of his screen test to critics in advance of the movie’s release. Hedda Hopper saw a preview and predicted that Gavin will “take the public by storm and so will the picture”. He was dubbed “Universal’s new white hope”.

The film was not a big success when it was released, although Gavin was praised by Jean-Luc Godard in an article in Cahiers du cinéma. “For a comparative newcomer he does remarkably well”, wrote the Chicago Daily Tribune.[16] The New York Times called him a “good-looking, dull young man whose speech, attitude and dull delivery betray the tyro from Hollywood”.The Los Angeles Times said he gave a “sensible, likeable” performance. “Never once is one convinced that Gavin is anything other than a nice looking American lad just out of college”, wrote The Washington Post. “One can hardly call Gavin’s a performance.”

Before A Time to Love and a Time to Die had been released, Gavin had already been cast by Douglas Sirk in another important role – supporting Lana Turner in Imitation of Life (1959). Unlike A Time to Love and a Time to Die, this was a spectacular success at the box office, and Gavin was voted most promising male newcomer for his performance in the film by the Motion Picture Exhibitor.

Universal then used him in the epic Spartacus (1960) directed by Stanley Kubrick in a key supporting role as Julius Caesar.He was then cast as Sam Loomis in the thriller Psycho (1960) for director Alfred Hitchcock. Gavin later claimed he was “terribly disturbed” by the sex and violence in Psycho and felt “I think Hitch really got frosted with me”. Both movies were successful critically and commercially.

In the words of one writer, the success of Imitation of Life meant Gavin “was invariably cast as a staunch fellow of good will who looked handsome but was permitted little action opposite… leading ladies.” He co-starred against Doris Day in the thriller Midnight Lace, Sophia Loren in the comedic A Breath of Scandal (both 1960) which Gavin later called a “turkey”, Susan Hayward in the melodrama Back Street and with Sandra Dee in Romanoff and Juliet and Tammy Tell Me True (all 1961). Most of these films were produced by Ross Hunter. Gavin also appeared periodically on TV during this time in various anthology series; he was directed by a young William Friedkin in an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.

Gavin later claimed that he lacked training support from Universal during his early days there:

When I walked through the gate, Universal quit building actors. All of a sudden I was doing leading roles. I knew I was a tyro but they told me to shut up and act. Some of those early roles were unactable. Even Laurence Olivier couldn’t have done anything with them. The dialog ran to cardboard passages such as ‘I love you. You can rely on me darling. I’ll wait.’ It was all I could do to keep from adding, ‘with egg on my face’… So I psyched myself negative… There was no studio system to let me work my way up through small roles. When I got up on my hind legs, no one would believe it.

He admitted in a 1960 interview that at one stage he even considered quitting acting to take up law:

I decided to stay after I became aware of what I was doing. I don’t want to be mediocre and I’m conceited enough to think I can be good in this business. But I really hope it’s nothing as silly as conceit that makes me say that.

He added that he wished people would stop comparing him to Rock Hudson “because I can’t but help come off second best.”

Gavin left Universal in 1962 to freelance. He signed to make several movies in Europe including The Assassins, The Challenge and Night Call. However he pulled out of The Assassins (which became Assassins of Rome (1965), Night Call was never made and The Challenge kept getting pushed back and was eventually permanently shelved.

In early 1964, he starred in the TV series Destry. He was quoted during filming:

When I came to Universal, they were making 40 pictures a year. I walked through the gate, was given a contract, and immediately the number of pictures dropped to eight or nine a year. I’m not complaining because I was given good roles… roles with scope and breadth. But I wish I could have been put in 40 or 50 roles before making my ‘first’ picture, do you know what I mean? Doing a series now is like putting the cart before the horse. I’m glad to be doing Destry now though because of the experience. My gosh, I’ve shot more film in the last five weeks than I have in my entire life.

The series was not a ratings success and was soon cancelled.

In September 1964, Gavin signed a new contract with Universal which gave him the option to take work outside the studio. He tried another TV series, Convoy which only had a short run before being cancelled. Gavin then appeared in a Mexican film Pedro Páramo (1967), based on the novel by Juan Rulfo. “I had to do something I was proud of”, said Gavin of the latter movie.

“Pedro broke the mould,” he added. “I had to break it. All the trash I’ve done. I just couldn’t do it anymore”.

While filming in Mexico, Gavin heard Universal was making an expensive 1920s-era Julie Andrews musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) for George Roy Hill, again for producer Ross Hunter. He lobbied for the role of Mary Tyler Moore’s stuffy boyfriend to Hunter and Universal production head Ed Muhl. “This is a square, square guy so I told them it would be such type casting that they just couldn’t get anyone else but me”, said Gavin.

Gavin read for director George Roy Hill and was cast. “I told Ross I’m playing a parody of every part I’ve had in a Ross Hunter picture”, said Gavin. He thought Millie had been a “breakthrough comedy role” for him. “Now I’m beginning to feel like a journeyman actor and I want a little more dimension in movie roles”, he said. “I’ve developed into a pretty good Sunday actor”, claimed Gavin in 1966, although he admitted to making mistakes in his career. “I have to be beat over the head. I’m intelligent, but not smart”.

In June 1966, Gavin signed a new non-exclusive contract with Universal, for five years at one film per year. Gavin did not regain his former prominence but was cast in the lead in OSS 117 – Double Agent (1968), then titled No Roses for Robert, replacing Frederick Stafford (who was filming Alfred Hitchcock’s Topaz). He won good supporting roles in The Madwoman of Chaillot (1969)and Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You (1970), in which he parodied his own image).

Gavin was signed for the role of James Bond in the film Diamonds Are Forever (1971) after George Lazenby (Bond in the previous series entry) left the role. “Time was getting awfully short”, said producer Albert Broccoli. “We had to have someone in the bullpen”. Head of United Artists, David Picker, however, wanted the box-office insurance of Sean Connery, and made Connery a highly lucrative offer to return as Bond. Gavin’s contract was still honored in full. According to Roger Moore’s James Bond Diary, Gavin also was slated to play Bond in Live and Let Die (1973), but Harry Saltzman insisted on a British actor for the role and Roger Moore played the role instead.

Gavin had been on the Board of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) in 1965. He served one term as Third Vice-President, and two terms as First Vice-President. He was president from 1971-73. According to the SAG website:

As Guild President, in 1972, he testified before the Federal Trade Commission on phone talent rackets; met with President Richard Nixon to present the problem of excessive television reruns; presented petitions to the federal government on issues of prime-time access rules, legislative assistance for American motion pictures (to combat Runaway Production), and film production by the government using non-professional actors.

He was defeated, in a ballot, by Dennis Weaver in 1973. Gavin was the first incumbent president to be defeated by an independent challenger.

Gavin made a successful foray into live theatre in the 1970s, showcasing his baritone voice. He toured the summer stock circuit as El Gallo in a production of The Fantasticks.

In 1973, Gavin replaced Ken Howard in the Broadway musical, Seesaw opposite Michele Lee, beating out Tab Hunter who also auditioned because, according to the producers, Gavin “sings and dances better than Hunter and looks great on stage with Michele”.(Gavin later claimed he was offered the musical from the beginning but turned it down because the book was not up to scratch, then changed his mind when Michael Bennett asked him to join the cast later.) He played the role for seven months, then stayed in it when the show toured the United States with Lucie Arnaz. Both the Broadway and touring production were directed by Michael Bennett.The Los Angeles Times said he gives a “solid performance”.

Gavin reflected in an interview during the tour, “I used to play one dimensional people. But looking backwards my work has been varied. Some people have said rich.”

In the late 1970s Gavin concentrated on TV and his growing business interests. His best known performance around this time was playing Cary Grant in the TV movie Sophia Loren: Her Own Story (1980).

John Gavin with first ladies Paloma Cordero of Mexico (left) and Nancy Reagan of the United States (right) after the 1985 Mexico City earthquake.

Gavin was cultural adviser to the Organization of American States from 1961 to 1965.

A Republican, Gavin was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Mexico in June 1981 by President Ronald Reagan and served until June 12, 1986.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Gavin was an “activist envoy to Mexico” who “won praise in many circles for his handling of such issues as trade and illegal drug dealing as well as for speaking out against anti-American sentiment. But his candor and meetings with critics of the ruling party prompted accusations by Mexicans of meddling in the country’s domestic affairs.”

In 1991, Gavin was sounded out about running for the Senate for the Republican Party but decided not to.

Gavin had numerous business interests parallel to his acting career. In June of 1986 following his work as ambassador to Mexico, Gavin became vice-president of Atlantic Richfield in the field of federal and international relations. In 1987 he resigned to become president of Univisa Satellite Communications, a new subsidiary of Univisa, the Spanish language broadcasting empire. He worked with them until December 1989.

Gavin was also president of Gamma Holdings, a global capital and consulting company which he helped found in 1968. He was chairman of Gamma Services International from January 1990.

He served on the boards of Causeway Capital (Chairman); The Hotchkis & Wiley Funds (Chairman); The TCW Strategic Income Fund since 2001; Securitas Security Services USA, Inc. since April 1993, DII Industries, LLC since 1986; Claxson Interactive Group Inc. since September 21, 2001; Anvita, Inc.; the Latin America Strategy Board at HM Capital Partners LLC; Apex Mortgage Capital Inc. since December 1997; Krause’s Furniture, Inc. since September 1996; Atlantic Richfield Co. since 1989; International Wire Holdings Company and International Wire Group Holdings, Inc. since June 1995.

He was Senior Counselor to Hicks Trans American Partners (a division of Hicks Holdings) from 2001, a Managing Director and partner of Hicks, Muse, Tate & Furst (Latin America) from 1994 to 2001. He was an Independent Trustee of Causeway International Value Fund since September 2001.

Gavin served on various pro bono boards, including: The Anderson Graduate School or Management at UCLA; Don Bosco Institute; the FEDCO Charitable Fund (administered by the California Community Foundation); The Hoover Institution; Loyola-Marymount University; The National Parks Foundation; The Southwest Museum; The University of the Americas; and Villanova Preparatory School.

In 1960, Hedda Hopper claimed she suggested Gavin play the lead in Back Street over William Holden or Gregory Peck as he was “a better actor than either of them.”

In 1973, Gavin himself reflected:

For a long time I wondered if I shouldn’t have gone into something worthwhile, such as being a doctor. To the bitter end Spencer Tracy was also tortured with the same agony. I’ve only recently realized there’s the actor in every human being – and to let it out, let it happen is a very wonderful, very giving thing. But I would have been so much happier in the past if I realized that sooner. You see, I would have relaxed.

Sam Stagg, author of a book on the making of the film Imitation of Life was critical of Gavin’s performance in that film and A Time to Love and a Time to Die:

In both films, Gavin is a foreign body: he slows them down like a virus that must run its course… What he did in this picture… he did in all the others – rather, it’s what he didn’t do: he didn’t act with his face, his eyes, his voice, his body. He resembles a chiseled monolith and his facial muscles move as rarely as Nicole Kidman’s… From the outset, critics have called Gavin “wooden”. But that critical cliche tells only half. If heartthrobs like Rock Hudson were dreamboats, then Gavin is a glass bottom boat – in dry dock. His depthless transparency exposes his shortcomings…  eye candy… low-calorie but filling and incapable of stealing a scene.

Gavin married actress Cicely Evans in 1957. They had two children and lived in Dennis O’Keefe’s former house in Beverly Hills. Gavin’s first marriage ended in divorce in 1965. While making No Roses for Robert in Italy in 1967 he dated co star Luciana Paluzzi.

Gavin was married to Constance Towers, a stage and television actress, from 1974 until his death. The couple first met in 1957 at a party when his godfather, Jimmy McHugh, introduced them. Towers had two children from her previous marriage to Eugene McGrath.

Gavin’s elder daughter, Cristina, followed in his footsteps and became an actress. His younger daughter, Maria, also followed in Gavin’s footsteps, with a master’s degree from Stanford, and has a successful career in television production.

He died on 9 February 2018, aged 86, due to complications with pneumonia. He was at home surrounded by his family. Gavin had also been battling leukemia for some time.

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Catherine Licardi -September 9, 1933 – February 9, 2018

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(Catherine Licardi -September 9, 1933 – February 9, 2018)

It is with great sadness that the family of Catherine F. Licardi announces that she has slipped quietly into the arms of our Heavenly Father on February 9, 2018 at the age of 84 at her residence.

She was born in Mineola, NY and moved to Vero Beach in 1992.

Proceeded in death by her husband Ben J Licardi.

Catherine will be lovingly remembered by her children, Ben Licardi, Carolann Krauss (Joseph), John Licardi (Patricia), and Linda Paulisin (Curtis). Catherine will also be remember by her most precious grandchildren, Joseph, John Michael, Jesse, Jasmine, Julia, L.J, John, Andrew, Katelyn, Brittany, and Alexandra and also her great grandchildren, Joseph, Taylor and Anna Marie. Sisters Rose Strange (Richard), Marina Burckhardt (William) and proceeded by her sister Mary Ann. She also leaves behind numerous nieces, nephews, extended family and dear friends. Catherine was thoughtful, loving, caring kind and generous. Even in her last days she was more concerned about her family the herself.

There will be a viewing at Aycock Funeral Home, Fort Pierce, FL. on February 16, 2018 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm.

A second viewing at Grace Baptist Church, Vero Beach, FL on February 17, 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00 am with Pastor Chris Drinnon officiating.

In lieu of flowers, Catherine request that donations be made to Grace Baptist Church building fund or St Jude Children’s Hospital in her name.

“Another strawberry milkshake?”

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Warren R. Doney – November 14, 1934 – February 2, 2018

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Warren R. Doney -(November 14, 1934 – February 2, 2018)
Warren Doney passed away on February 02, 2018. Funeral Home Services for Warren are being provided by Aycock Funeral Home of Fort Pierce, FL

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Jon Meade Huntsman Sr.- June 21, 1937 – February 2, 2018

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Jon Meade Huntsman Sr. (June 21, 1937 – February 2, 2018) was an American businessman and philanthropist. He was the founder and executive chairman of Huntsman Corporation, a global manufacturer and marketer of specialty chemicals. Huntsman plastics are used in a wide variety of familiar objects, including (formerly) McDonald’s clamshell burger containers. Huntsman Corporation also manufactures a wide variety of organic and inorganic chemicals that include polyurethanes, textiles, and pigments. Huntsman’s philanthropic giving exceeds $1.5 billion, focusing on areas of cancer research, programs at various universities, and aid to Armenia.

Jon Meade Huntsman was born in Blackfoot, Idaho, into a poor family. His mother, Sarah Kathleen (née Robison; 1910–1969), was a homemaker, and his father, Alonzo Blaine Huntsman Sr. (1910–1990), was a school educator. In 1950, the family moved to Palo Alto, California, where Alonzo pursued graduate studies at Stanford University, earning an M.A. and Ed.D. He then became a superintendent of schools in the Los Altos district.

Jon Huntsman attended Palo Alto High School, where he became student body president. He was recruited by Harold Zellerbach, chairman of Crown-Zellerbach Paper Company, to attend the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania on a Zellerbach scholarship. He graduated from Wharton in the spring of 1959, a brother of the Sigma Chi fraternity.

Huntsman married Karen Haight, daughter of David B. Haight, in June 1959, just weeks after he graduated. Both are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). In July 1959, Huntsman left to serve for two years in the U.S. Navy as an officer aboard the USS Calvert. He subsequently earned an MBA from the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business in 1966.

Huntsman was married to his wife, Karen, for more than 50 years. They are the parents of nine and grandparents of 56, two of whom are adopted from China and India.

Huntsman’s eldest son, Jon Huntsman Jr., also served as a Huntsman Corporation executive. He was elected Governor of Utah in 2004 and was a candidate in the Republican Party presidential primaries in 2012. He has also served in other governmental positions, including as Ambassador of the United States to Singapore, China, and (as of 2017) Russia.

On December 8, 1987, Huntsman’s son, James, then age 16, was kidnapped and held for $1 million ransom by Nicholas Hans Byrd, a former classmate. FBI agents traced the kidnapper and rescued James unharmed, but agent Al Jacobsen was stabbed in the chest during the arrest. Huntsman’s second eldest son, Peter R. Huntsman, took over as CEO of the Huntsman Corporation from Huntsman Sr. in 2000.

Huntsman has published a book about his life experience, communicating moral lessons. Titled Winners Never Cheat: Everyday Values We Learned as Children (But May Have Forgotten), it was published by Wharton School Publishing in 2005. A second edition, titled Winners Never Cheat: Even in Difficult Times, made the Wall Street Journal’s best-sellers list.

Huntsman was a four-time cancer survivor.He died on February 2, 2018.

 

Douglas Malcolm MacArthur -February 3, 1970 – February 2, 2018

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Jensen Beach, FL – Douglas Malcolm MacArthur – (February 3, 1970 – February 2, 2018) painter, artist, master framer, and music lover, passed away peacefully at hospice after an acute illness surrounded, by his immediate family. He was a beloved son, cherished brother, adored uncle, and friend to all. Douglas is survived by his mother Mary Catherine MacArthur (nee Kenny), brother Campbell Cecile MacArthur of Ramsey, NJ, brother Robert Bruce MacArthur of Tenafly, NJ, and sister Mary Catherine MacArthur, of Boca Raton FL. Douglas is also survived by loving uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and their children.

Douglas was born in Ridgewood NJ, and for two decades was a master art framer in Englewood NJ. He moved to Florida in 2001. Douglas’s devotion to family was second to none. His sense of humor touched the hearts of all that knew him, and his enthusiasm for life was contagious. Douglas was passionate about music, art, the beach, and Sponge Bob, among many other things.

Services and funeral will be private.

In lieu of flowers, Douglas recommends that you listen to some Grateful Dead, Sinead O’Connor, and CeeLo Green, while sitting in your favorite chair, and living life to the fullest.

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Dennis Edwards Jr. – February 3, 1943 – February 1, 2018

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Dennis Edwards Jr. (February 3, 1943 – February 1, 2018) was an American soul and R&B singer who was best known as the frontman in The Temptations, on Motown Records. Edwards joined the Temptations in 1968, replacing David Ruffin and sang with the group from 1968 to 1976, 1980 to 1984 and 1987 to 1989. In the mid-1980s, he attempted a solo career, scoring a hit in 1984 with “Don’t Look Any Further” (featuring Siedah Garrett). Until his death, Edwards was the lead singer of The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards, a Temptations splinter group.

Edwards was born in Fairfield, Alabama, about eight miles from Birmingham, to Reverend Dennis Edwards Sr. He began singing as a toddler, just two years old, in his father’s church. The Edwards family moved to Detroit, Michigan when Edwards was about ten years old, and Edwards would continue to sing in the church pastored by his father, eventually becoming choir director.

As a teenager, Edwards joined a gospel vocal group called The Mighty Clouds of Joy, and studied music at the Detroit Conservatory of Music. He was not allowed to sing or listen to secular music at home, and his mother disapproved when he began pursuing a career singing rhythm and blues music. In 1961 he organized his own soul/jazz group, Dennis Edwards and the Fireballs. In 1961, Edwards recorded a single for the obscure Detroit label, International Soulville Records, “I Didn’t Have to (But I Did)” b/w “Johnnie on the Spot”.Following time served in the US military, in 1966 Edwards auditioned for Detroit’s Motown Records, where he was signed but placed on retainer. Later that year, he was assigned to join The Contours after their lead singer, Billy Gordon, fell ill. In 1967, the Contours were the opening act for several Temptations concerts, and Temptations members Eddie Kendricks and Otis Williams – who were considering replacing their own lead singer, David Ruffin (who was a personal frien

d of Edwards), took notice of Edwards and made his acquaintance.Later in 1967, Edwards quit the Contours and was placed back on retainer. He attempted to get a release from his contract, as Holland–Dozier–Holland had promised to sign him to their new Invictus Records, but was drafted in late June 1968 to join the Temptations, who had just fired Ruffin from the act. Ruffin had tipped Edwards off that he was being drafted as his replacement, which eased Edwards’ conscience in replacing him.

The Temptations officially introduced Edwards on July 9, 1968 on stage in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. However, Ruffin, who was attempting to make his way back into the group, crashed the stage during Edwards’ lead vocal on “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” to significant applause. He continued similar stunts for about a month until, according to Edwards, the group decided to lay-off Edwards — with the promise of a solo deal from Motown — and rehire Ruffin. When Ruffin failed to show for his return engagement in Gaithersburg, Maryland the next night, Edwards was permanently kept on and the Temptations refused to entertain rehiring Ruffin any further. Edwards was the first singer to join the Temptations after their “Classic 5” period. With his rougher gospel-hewn vocals, Edwards led the group through its psychedelic, funk, and disco periods, singing on hits such as “Cloud Nine” (1968), “I Can’t Get Next to You” (1969), “Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World Is Today)” (1970), “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone” (1972

), and “Shakey Ground” (1975), among others. Two of these songs, “Cloud Nine” and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”, won Grammy Awards. During this time, Edwards was engaged to Yvonne “Frankie” Gearing, the lead singer of Quiet Elegance, and The Temptations toured with them as their backing group.

Edwards remained in the Temptations until being fired by Otis Williams in 1977 just before the group’s departure from Motown to Atlantic Records. After a failed attempt at a Motown solo career, Edwards rejoined the Temptations in 1980, when they returned to Motown. In 1982, Edwards got the chance to sing with Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks as part of the Reunion album and tour. Edwards began missing shows and rehearsals, and was replaced in 1984 by Ali-Ollie Woodson. In 1989, Edwards was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of The Temptations. Edwards was also inducted into Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame with The Temptations in 2013.

Motown re-launched Edwards’ solo career, in 1984 with the hit single “Don’t Look Any Further,” a duet with Siedah Garrett. The album of the same name reached No. 2 on the R&B charts and included the radio singles “(You’re My) Aphrodisiac” and “Just Like You.” The 1985 follow-up album Coolin’ Out included the title track, an R&B Top 30 hit; and “Try a Little Tenderness.” When problems arose between Woodson and the Temptations in 1987, Edwards was brought back once again, but was himself replaced by Woodson in 1989 after being fired a third and final time by Williams

Edwards toured and recorded with fellow ex-Temptations David Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks during the late 1980s as “Ruffin/Kendricks/Edwards, former leads of The Temptations”, although nothing was released. The 1998 Street Gold DVD Original Leads of the Temptations documents this historic period. After the deaths of Ruffin (1991) and Kendricks (1992), Edwards was forced to wrap up the project alone. In 1990, Dennis teamed up with Kendricks to release a dance/club track for A&B Records entitled “Get It While It’s Hot”. The track was recorded at Fredrick Knight’s recording studio in the duo’s old home town of Birmingham, Alabama; it was produced and engineered by house music pioneer Alan Steward. The track created a lot of controversy, as it contained a short rap sequence which did not sit very well with die-hard Temptations fans. Edwards’ Don’t Look Any Further: the Remix Album was released in 1998, containing updated dance mixes and the original 1984 track.

During the 1990s, Edwards began touring under the name ‘Dennis Edwards & the Temptations’, prompting a legal battle between himself and Otis Williams. It was decided that Edwards’ group would be called The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards (this name remains extant). Edwards’ group included Paul Williams Jr. (son of original Temptations member Paul Williams), David Sea, Mike Patillo, and Chris Arnold. Edwards was portrayed by Charles Ley in the 1998 biographical television mini-series The Temptations, though he was not heavily focused upon, as the mini-series gave more attention to the Ruffin/Kendricks-era Temptations lineup. The Temptations Review group was inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Music Hall of Fame on October 4, 2015 in Detroit, Michigan, when Edwards was also given the Living Legend Award

Edwards was admired by singer Aretha Franklin, who stated he was the inspiration behind her 1972 R&B/Soul song Day Dreaming. Edwards was briefly married to Ruth Pointer, whom he wed in Las Vegas in 1977.The couple had one daughter, Issa Pointer, who became a member of her mother’s vocal group, The Pointer Sisters. Edwards moved to Florissant, Missouri in the 1980s to be closer to his mother.Edwards died in a Chicago hospital on February 1, 2018, two days before his 75th birthday. He had been battling with meningitis before his death.

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Dr. Isadore Rosenfeld – September 7, 1926 – January 30, 2018

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Dr. Isadore Rosenfeld -(September 7, 1926 – January 30, 2018)

New York physician who dispensed medical advice in best-selling books, in magazine articles and on television, died on Jan. 30 in Greenwich, Conn. He was 91.

The cause was complications of the flu, his son Dr. Stephen Rosenfeld said.

Dr. Rosenfeld was a cardiologist and general practitioner who worked for more than 50 years at an Upper East Side office that attracted a roster of prominent patients.

Until he retired in 2011, he also taught clinical medicine at the Weill Cornell Medical College and hosted the Fox News health program “Sunday Housecall With Dr. Rosenfeld.” He had earlier been the health editor of Parade magazine, president of the New York Medical Society and a member of the board of Research!America, a nonprofit organization that advocates for more medical and health research.

Dr. Rosenfeld wrote more than a dozen books, several of them best sellers, including “Modern Prevention: The New Medicine” (1986), “The Best Treatment” (1991), “Dr. Rosenfeld’s Guide to Alternative Medicine” (1997) and “Live Now, Age Later: Proven Ways to Slow Down the Clock” (1999).

The unabashed physician also made a cameo appearance as a professor presenting a ceremonial pen to the mathematician John Nash (played by Russell Crowe) in the 2001 film “A Beautiful Mind.”

A Canadian-born son of Jewish refugees who had fled Russia after the revolution, Dr. Rosenfeld was told by his mother that “good and obedient children grow up to be either doctors or lawyers,” he recalled in his memoir, “Doctor of the Heart: My Life in Medicine” (2009).

He decided between the two careers when he was only 4 years old, after a severe cold gave him a 104-degree fever and convulsions. His parents summoned a doctor, Phineas Rabinovitch, who lived down the block.

One of Dr. Rosenfeld’s best-selling medical advice books, from 1989. Credit Simon and Schuster

“I begged her not to call him,” Dr. Rosenfeld wrote. “I remembered vividly the last time I’d been to a doctor — how he had hurt me with what seemed like a three-foot-long needle! I trembled when I heard the doorbell ring.”

But Dr. Rabinovitch was different. He explained that he, too, had recently been sick. He handed his young patient a flashlight and asked him to look down the doctor’s throat to see if any “green gremlins” lingered.

“I told him I saw lots of red and pink things in his throat, but no green gremlins,” Dr. Rosenfeld recalled. “That, in effect, was the beginning of my medical career. At four years of age, I had examined my first patient — and he was a doctor!”

When Dr. Rabinovitch learned that the boy’s father had been a successful businessman in Russia but was scraping by on $6 a week selling farm equipment, he waived the 75-cent fee for a house call.

“From that moment on,” Dr. Rosenfeld wrote, “my mother never again mentioned the legal profession to me.”

He was born Ezra Rosenfeld on Sept. 7, 1926, in Montreal to Morris Rosenfeld and the former Vera Friedman. After his mother saw so many signs for store owners with the name Isadore, she changed his name from Ezra, thinking it would sound more Canadian. Their neighborhood, as it turned out, was predominantly Jewish.

He earned a bachelor of science degree from McGill University in Montreal in 1947 and went on to receive a medical degree there. He decided to specialize in cardiology because his father had angina.

In 1956, he married Camilla Master and joined the practice of her father, Dr. Arthur M. Master, a New York cardiologist who helped develop a precursor to the common stress test for heart disease. The couple lived in Purchase, N.Y., after moving there from Manhattan. Dr. Rosenfeld died in nearby Greenwich Hospital.

In addition to his wife and his son Stephen, he is survived by two other sons, Arthur and Herbert; a daughter, Hildi Silbert; and nine grandchildren.

Writing in The New York Times Magazine in 1981, Dr. Rosenfeld acknowledged that patients had valid complaints about the cost and quality of medical care.

In the article, titled “A Doctor Defends His Calling,” he recommended better monitoring of the profession by fellow doctors and state regulators, more realistic insurance reimbursement policies, medical school training that would encourage personal contact between physicians and their patients, and caps on malpractice awards.

Dr. Rosenfeld sought to explain the evolution in bedside manner since 1930, when he had been treated at home by Dr. Rabinovitch. Advances like antibiotics and the proliferation of specialists had helped prolong life, he said, but most modern medical practitioners “are often perceived as more concerned with pathology than with patients.”

“From their point of view, their task is to cure you, not hold your hand,” he wrote. “The great pity is that they don’t seem to think that they can or should do both.”

Still, he added, “I suspect that, given the choice, most patients would prefer to be cured, however impersonally, rather than die with tender, loving care.”

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Ellenor Hughes Bruetsch – May 22, 1936 – January 24, 2018

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Ellenor Hughes Bruetsch – (May 22, 1936 – January 24, 2018)
Ellenor H. Bruetsch, of Stuart, FL, passed away on January 24, 2018.
Ellenor was born in 1936 to parents, Richard Hughes and Florence Quell of Rensselaer, New York.
Elly was a proficient sewing craftswoman during her adult life.
She leaves behind her husband, Walter; children, Christine (Richard Creange) and James (Cynthia Annunziata); three grandchildren and two nieces.
A gathering of friends and family will be held on Monday, January 29, 2018 from 1:00-2:00PM with a service to begin at 2:00PM at Aycock Funeral Home, Young and Prill Chapel in Stuart, FL.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the charity of your choice.

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John S. Harbar Jr. – January 9, 1950 – January 24, 2018

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John S. Harbar Jr. – (January 9, 1950 – January 24, 2018) John S. Harbar, Jr., 68, of Hobe Sound, FL, passed away on January 24, 2018 at Jupiter Medical Center in Jupiter, FL

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Mary Rose Werder – August 22, 1932 – January 25, 2018

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Mary Rose Werder (August 22, 1932 – January 25, 2018), 85 of Newnan, Georgia , loving wife of 42 years to the late Edward R. Werder , unexpectedly passed away on Thursday, January 25, 2018 at Atlanta Medical Center.

Born in Newark, New Jersey August 22. 1932, she was daughter of the late James & Cecelia Tinney. In addition to her parents and husband Mrs. Werder was preceded in death by sisters: Eleanor and Cecelia Tinney, brothers: James, John, Daniel and Joseph Tinney.

Mary met her husband Edward at General Instruments where they were both employed and married in 1967. They left the North in 1975 and spend most of their lives together in Florida. Mary moved to Newnan in 2009 after the death of her husband.

Mary had a real zest for life. She was a parishioner at St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church and member of the prayer shawl ministry. Mary loved going out of her way for others. She spent countless hours crocheting Angel -Wing prayer shawls for the patient’s at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Newnan. When she was not crocheting, Mary loved watching her grandchildren follow their dreams playing baseball or performing on stage. She loved shopping and going to lunch with her daughters Lisa and Linda.

Survivors include : brother Michael Tinney, daughters: Lisa Vasquez (Pedro), Linda Jarvis (Jim), nieces: Patricia Ott (Kyle) and Jeanne Tinney, grandsons: Ryan Vasquez (Breanna), James and Jeremy Vasquez; grandaughters: Alison and Jennifer Jarvis and great-grandson Jase Vasquez.

Family and friends are welcome to attend a visitation from 6-8pm on February 2, 2018 at Aycock Funeral Home Young and Prill Chapel, 6801 SE Federal Hwy, Stuart, Florida 34997.

A funeral mass will be celebrated on February 3, 2018 at 10am at St. Christopher’s Catholic Church, 12001 SE Federal Hwy, Hobe Sound, Florida 33455 with Very Rev. Aidan Hynes , V.F. officiating followed by lunch.

Interment will take place on Sunday February 4, 2018 at 9 am at Fernhill Memorial Gardens & Mausoleum, 1501 South Kanner Hwy, Stuart, Florida 34994.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Treasure Coast Hospice treasurehealth.org or Southeastern Assistance in Healthcare 600 Celebrate Life Pkwy, Newnan, GA 30265

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Oscar Charles Gamble – December 20, 1949 – January 31, 2018

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Oscar Charles Gamble (December 20, 1949 – January 31, 2018) was an American professional baseball player. He played as an outfielder and designated hitter in Major League Baseball for 17 seasons, from 1969 to 1985, for seven different teams: the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees on two separate occasions, as well as the Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies, Cleveland Indians, San Diego Padres, and Texas Rangers.Gamble was born in Ramer, Alabama to Sam Gamble, a sharecropper and Mamie Scott, a homemaker. He was discovered playing baseball in a semi-professional league by legendary Negro league baseball player Buck O’Neil, who was working as a scout for the Chicago Cubs at the time. O’Neil convinced the Cubs to draft Gamble, which they did in the sixteenth round.[3]

Gamble played with the Caldwell Cubs of the Pioneer League in 1968 and the San Antonio Missions of the Texas League in 1969, from where he received his call-up to the Chicago Cubs late in the 1969 season.

Nicknamed the Big O by Yankees announcer Phil Rizzuto, Gamble was a great baseball player given the amount of time he was allowed to play in the game. Despite the limited playing time, he still hit 200 career home runs in just over 4,500 major league at bats. Oscar’s career peaked in 1977 with the White Sox, when he hit 31 home runs and tallied 83 RBI. After an ill-fated, injury-plagued year in San Diego, he returned to the American League in 1979 to hit a career-best .358 batting average, slamming 19 home runs with the Yankees and Rangers. (He did not have enough plate appearances to qualify for the American League batting title.)

Unlike some players who failed to cope with the New York media, Oscar thrived on it, and was always a favorite with sportswriters. Gamble, whose hitting prowess was overshadowed by his famously large Afro hairdo, has the distinction of logging the last hit and RBI at Philadelphia’s Connie Mack Stadium on October 1, 1970. His 10th-inning single scored Tim McCarver with the run that gave the Phillies the 2–1 win in the stadium’s final game. The game was also overshadowed as unruly fans stormed the field during and after the game to claim bases, infield dirt, seats, and other various stadium items.

In 1976, Gamble helped the Yankees return to prominence as the “Bronx Bombers” won their first American League pennant in 12 seasons, hitting 17 home runs and 57 RBI. His left-handed power stroke was ideal for the renowned short right field fence at Yankee Stadium. Returning to the Yankees in 1979, he would settle into a limited role with the team, aiding the Yankees once again to an American League East division title in 1980 and a World Series appearance in 1981.

Gamble had one of the more unusual batting stances in the major leagues. He stood at the plate in a deep crouch with his back almost parallel to the ground. Gamble claimed this stance helped him see the ball better as his eyes were right above the plate and close to where the ball was pitched.

Notably, Gamble also finished with more career walks (610) than strikeouts (546). He was considered a below-average fielder, and consequently played over a third of his games as a designated hitter, but he had a good arm. He played in the 2007 Yankee Old Timers Game with many Yankee players that were honored from the 1977 championship team.

Gamble lived in Little Ferry, New Jersey, while playing with the Yankees.

His quote about the Yankees’ disorganization and circus-like atmosphere, “They don’t think it be like it is, but it do”, has also been called one of baseball’s “immortal lines” by sportswriter Dan Epstein.

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Joseph Lockwood – August 16, 1925 – January 31, 2018

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Joseph Irving Lockwood- (August 16, 1925 – January 31, 2018) 92, of Hobe Sound, FL, passed away on January 31, 2018. To his friends, he was known as “Bud”.

Born in Morgan, New Jersey, to William and Lillian (Deter) Lockwood, Bud grew up in Morgan Creek and attended school in Sayreville, NJ. He was part of the first class to graduate from Sayreville War Memorial High School in June of 1943.

After graduation, he enlisted in the United States Navy and saw action in the South Pacific and served with an elite group of Navy personnel known as the “Armed Guard”. Bud received an honorable discharge from the United States Navy in March of 1946 as a Seaman First Class.

After World War II, he continued to work in the bait and tackle business with his parents. Bud also took up other jobs as means of support and it was then that he discovered his talents in the construction field as a mason. During the years to follow, until his retirement, he built many houses, businesses, and anything else involving cement, block, brick, stone and concrete.

In January of 1951, Bud married Grace Dawson, and they had two children, twins, Glenn and Gail, born in February 1952.

Bud and his family loved to Stuart in 1970 from Colts Neck, NJ. Grace passed in March of 2010. He was a member of the American Legion post 126 of Jensen Beach, and also a member of the VFW Post 10132 in Hobe Sound,

He is survived by his son, Glenn of Hobe Sound, FL; daughter, Gail of Wauchula, FL; and grandson, Blair Root of Port Salerno, FL.

Visitationwill be held on Monday, February 5, 2018 from 9:00AM-10:00AM with a funeral service to begin at 10:00AM at Aycock Funeral Home, Young and Prill Chapel in South Stuart. Interment will be held at All Saints Cemetery in Jensen Beach.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, PO BOX 2000, Boys Ranch, FL 32064.

Please sign his online guestbook at www.youngandprill.com

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Louis Zorich – February 12, 1924 – January 30, 2018

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Louis Zorich (February 12, 1924 – January 30, 2018) was an American actor. He is perhaps best known to television audiences for his portrayal of Paul Buchman’s father, Burt Buchman, on the NBC series Mad About You. He played the role from 1993 to 1999.

Zorich was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Croatian immigrants Anna (née Gledic) and Christ Zoric. He attended Earle Elementary School before going on to attend Roosevelt College and Goodman Theater School of Drama in his hometown of Chicago.Zorich was married to Academy Award winning actress Olympia Dukakis from 1962 until his death. They had three children together. Louis’ nephew, Chris Zorich, is a former defensive tackle who played in college for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and in the National Football League for the Chicago Bears and Washington Redskins.

In 1965, Zorich recorded and released an album on Folkways Records, entitled Moby Dick: Selections Read by Louis Zorich. One of Zorich’s first major film roles was the Russian Constable in the 1971 film Fiddler on the Roof. He was featured in Popi and For Pete’s Sake and played the role of Pete in the 1984 film The Muppets Take Manhattan. In 1986 he played a Swiss businessman in Club Paradise with Robin Williams, and in 1988 appeared as Nikos, the Greek millionaire, part of a group arriving in a yacht party, in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels with Steve Martin and Michael Caine. He also had a co-starring role in the critically acclaimed, albeit short-lived, TV comedy Brooklyn Bridge playing family patriarch Jules Berger.

He also starred in the 1976 Broadway play Herzl.

He also edited the anthology What Have You Done: The Inside Stories of Auditioning from the Ridiculous to the Sublime

Zorich was on the faculty of HB Studio in New York City. He died in Manhattan at the age of 93 on January 30, 2018.

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Addison Morton “Mort” Walker September 3, 1923 – January 27, 2018

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Addison Morton “Mort” Walker (September 3, 1923 – January 27, 2018) was an American comic strip writer, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. He signed Addison to some of his strips.Walker was born in El Dorado, Kansas, as the third of four children in the family.After a couple of years, his family moved to Amarillo, Texas, and later to Kansas City, Missouri, in late 1927, where his father, Robin Adair Walker (d. 1951),was an architect while his mother, Carolyn Richards Walker (d. 1970),worked as a newspaper staff illustrator.He was of Scottish, Irish and English descent. One of his ancestors was a doctor aboard the Mayflower.

During his elementary school years, he drew for a student newspaper. He attended Northeast High School, where he was a cheerleader, school newspaper editor, yearbook art editor, stage actor in a radio show and ran neighborhood teen center that belonged to several orgnisations. He had his first comic published at age 11 and sold his first cartoon at 12. At age 14, he regularly sold gag cartoons to Child’s Life, Flying Aces, and Inside Detective magazines. When he was 15, he drew a comic strip, The Lime Juicers, for the weekly Kansas City Journal, and working as a staff artist the same time for an industrial publisher. At age 18, he was the chief editorial designer for Hallmark Brothers (later Hallmark Cards) and was instrumental in changing the company’s card from cuddly bears to gag cartoons, which is more suitable for soldiers.

Graduating from Northeast High School, he attended one year at Kansas City Junior College in 1942–43 before going to the University of Missouri. Walker’s physical presence in Columbia is noted by The Shack, which was a rambling burger joint behind Jesse Hall on Conley Avenue. Images resembling the interior of the shack appeared in Beetle Bailey cartoons and is mentioned by name in September 14, 1950 Beetle Bailey strip. Walker visited the Shack on return trips to Columbia with the last being to the original structure in 1978. The Shack was destroyed in a fire in 1988 and Walker returned in 2010 for dedication of a replica of the building in the student center with dining area now formally called “Mort’s”.A life-sized bronze statue of Beetle Bailey stands in front of the alumni center which is near The Shack.

In 1943, Walker was drafted into the United States Army and served in Italy, where he was an intelligence and investigating officer and was also in charge of an Allied camp for 10,000 German POWs. After the war he was posted to Italy where he was in charge of an Italian guard company. He was discharged as a first lieutenant in 1947. He graduated in 1948 from the University of Missouri, where he was the editor and art director of the college’s humor magazine, Showme, and was president of the local Kappa Sigma chapter.After graduation, Walker went to New York to pursue a career in cartooning. He began doing Spider, a one-panel series for The Saturday Evening Post, about a lazy, laid-back college student. When he decided he could make more money doing a multi-panel comic strip, Spider morphed into Beetle Bailey, eventually distributed by King Features Syndicate to 1,800 newspapers in more than 50 countries for a combined readership of 200 million daily.

In 1954, Walker and Dik Browne teamed to launch Hi and Lois, a spin-off of Beetle Bailey (Lois was Beetle’s sister). Under the pseudonym “Addison”, Walker began Boner’s Ark in 1968. Other comic strips created by Walker include Gamin and Patches,Mrs. Fitz’s Flats, The Evermores, Sam’s Strip, and Sam and Silo (the last two with Jerry Dumas).

In 1974, Walker opened the Museum of Cartoon Art, the first museum devoted to the art of comics. It was initially located in Greenwich, Connecticut, and Rye Brook, New York, before moving to Boca Raton, Florida, in 1992.

During his life he drew special drawings for individuals, in particular for those who were ill.

From previous marriages, Walker and his wife, Catherine, had ten children between them.[10] Walker’s sons Brian and Greg Walker produce the Hi and Lois strip with Chance Browne.In addition to books about comics and children’s books, Walker has collected his strips into 92 “Beetle Bailey” paperbacks and 35 “Hi and Lois” paperbacks, plus writing his autobiography, Mort Walker’s Scrapbook: Celebrating a Life of Love and Laughter.

In his book The Lexicon of Comicana (1980), written as a satirical look at the devices cartoonists use, Walker invented a vocabulary called Symbolia. For example, Walker coined the term “squeans” to describe the starbusts and little circles that appear around a cartoon’s head to indicate intoxication. The typographical symbols that stand for profanities, which appear in dialogue balloons in the place of actual dialogue, Walker called “grawlixes”.

In 2006, he launched a 24-page magazine, The Best of Times, distributed free throughout Connecticut and available online.It features artwork, puzzles, editorial cartoons, ads, and a selection of articles, comics and columns syndicated by King Features. His son, Neal Walker, was the editor and publisher. Between 2006 and 2010, they published 27 issues.In 1974, he founded the National Cartoon Museum, and in 1989 was inducted into its Museum of Cartoon Art Hall of Fame. He received the Reuben Award of 1953 for Beetle Bailey, the National Cartoonists Society’s Humor Strip Award for 1966 and 1969, the Gold T-Square Award in 1999, the Elzie Segar Award for 1977 and 1999, and numerous other awards.In 1978, Walker received the American Legion’s Fourth Estate Award, and in 2000, he was given the Decoration for Distinguished Civilian Service by the United States Army.

Walker received the Sparky Award for lifetime achievement from the Cartoon Art Museum at the 2010 New York Comic-Con. On September 29, 2017, Walker was honored at Yankee Stadium, during the 7th inning stretch, for his service in World War II.

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Feodor Ingvar Kamprad 30 March 1926 – 27 January 2018

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Feodor Ingvar Kamprad (30 March 1926 – 27 January 2018) was a Swedish business magnate. He was the founder of IKEA, a multinational retail company specialising in furniture. He lived in Switzerland from 1976 to 2014. Kamprad was the second richest man in Europe (behind Amancio Ortega) at the time of his death.Kamprad began to develop a business as a young boy. He started selling matches at the age of five. When he was seven he began travelling further afield on his bicycle to sell to neighbours. He found he could buy matches in bulk very cheaply from Stockholm, sell them individually at a low price, and still make a good profit. From matches, he expanded to selling fish, Christmas tree decorations, seeds, and later ballpoint pens and pencils.When Kamprad was 17, his father gave him a cash reward for succeeding in his studies.

IKEA was founded in 1943, selling replicas of Kamprad’s uncle Ernst’s kitchen table. In 1948, Kamprad diversified his portfolio, adding furniture. His business was mostly mail order.The acronym IKEA is made up of the initials of his name (Ingvar Kamprad) plus those of Elmtaryd, the family farm where he was born, and the nearby village Agunnaryd where he was raised.

In June 2013, Kamprad resigned from the board of Inter IKEA Holding SA and his youngest son Mathias Kamprad replaced Per Ludvigsson as the chairman of the holding company. Following his decision to step down, the then-87-year-old founder explained, “I see this as a good time for me to leave the board of Inter IKEA Group. By that we are also taking another step in the generation shift that has been ongoing for some years.” Mathias and his two older brothers, who also have leadership roles at IKEA, work on the corporation’s overall vision and long-term strategy.While generally a private person, Kamprad had published a few notable works. He first detailed his philosophies of frugality and simplicity in a manifesto entitled A Testament of a Furniture Dealer in 1976.

Kamprad also worked with Swedish journalist Bertil Torekull on Leading by Design: The IKEA Story. In the autobiographical book, Kamprad further describes his philosophies and the trials and triumphs of the founding of IKEA.

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Hugh Ramapolo Masekela 4 April 1939 – 23 January 2018

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Hugh Ramapolo Masekela(4 April 1939 – 23 January 2018)was a South African trumpeter, flugelhornist, cornetist, composer and singer. He has been described as “the father of South African jazz.” Masekela was known for his jazz compositions and for writing well-known anti-apartheid songs such as “Soweto Blues” and “Bring Him Back Home”. He also had a number 1 US pop hit in 1968 with his version of “Grazing in the Grass”. Masekela was born in KwaGuqa Township, Witbank, South Africa to Thomas Selena Masekela, who was a health inspector and sculptor and his wife, Pauline Bowers Masekela, a social worker. As a child, he began singing and playing piano and was largely raised by his grandmother, who ran an illegal bar for miners. At the age of 14, after seeing the film Young Man with a Horn (in which Kirk Douglas plays a character modelled on American jazz cornetist Bix Beiderbecke), Masekela took up playing the trumpet. His first trumpet, from Louis Armstrong, was given to him by Archbishop Trevor Huddlesto

n, the anti-apartheid chaplain at St. Peter’s Secondary School now known as St. Martin’s School (Rosettenville).

Huddleston asked the leader of the then Johannesburg “Native” Municipal Brass Band, Uncle Sauda, to teach Masekela the rudiments of trumpet playing.Masekela quickly mastered the instrument. Soon, some of his schoolmates also became interested in playing instruments, leading to the formation of the Huddleston Jazz Band, South Africa’s first youth orchestra. By 1956, after leading other ensembles, Masekela joined Alfred Herbert’s African Jazz Revue.

From 1954, Masekela played music that closely reflected his life experience. The agony, conflict, and exploitation South Africa faced during the 1950s and 1960s inspired and influenced him to make music and also spread political change. He was an artist who in his music vividly portrayed the struggles and sorrows, as well as the joys and passions of his country. His music protested about apartheid, slavery, government; the hardships individuals were living. Masekela reached a large population that also felt oppressed due to the country’s situation.

Following a Manhattan Brothers tour of South Africa in 1958, Masekela wound up in the orchestra of the musical King Kong, written by Todd Matshikiza.King Kong was South Africa’s first blockbuster theatrical success, touring the country for a sold-out year with Miriam Makeba and the Manhattan Brothers’ Nathan Mdledle in the lead. The musical later went to London’s West End for two years.

At the end of 1959, Dollar Brand (later known as Abdullah Ibrahim), Kippie Moeketsi, Makhaya Ntshoko, Johnny Gertze and Hugh formed the Jazz Epistles,the first African jazz group to record an LP. They performed to record-breaking audiences in Johannesburg and Cape Town through late 1959 to early 1960.

Following the 21 March 1960 Sharpeville massacre—where 69 protestors were shot dead in Sharpeville, and the South African government banned gatherings of ten or more people—and the increased brutality of the Apartheid state, Masekela left the country. He was helped by Trevor Huddleston and international friends such as Yehudi Menuhin and John Dankworth, who got him admitted into London’s Guildhall School of Music in 1960. During that period, Masekela visited the United States, where he was befriended by Harry Belafonte. After securing a scholarship back in London, he moved to the United States to attend the Manhattan School of Music in New York, where he studied classical trumpet from 1960 to 1964. In 1964, Mariam Makeba and Masekela were married, divorcing two years later.

He had hits in the United States with the pop jazz tunes “Up, Up and Away” (1967) and the number-one smash “Grazing in the Grass” (1968), which sold four million copies. He also appeared at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, and was subsequently featured in the film Monterey Pop by D. A. Pennebaker. In 1974, Masekela and friend Stewart Levine organised the Zaire 74 music festival in Kinshasa set around the Rumble in the Jungle boxing match.

He played primarily in jazz ensembles, with guest appearances on recordings by The Byrds (“So You Want to Be a Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” and “Lady Friend”) and Paul Simon (“Further to Fly”). In 1984, Masekela released the album Techno Bush; from that album, a single entitled “Don’t Go Lose It Baby” peaked at number two for two weeks on the dance charts. In 1987, he had a hit single with “Bring Him Back Home”. The song became enormously popular, and turned into an unofficial anthem of the anti-apartheid movement and an anthem for the movement to free Nelson Mandela.

A renewed interest in his African roots led Masekela to collaborate with West and Central African musicians, and finally to reconnect with Southern African players when he set up with the help of Jive Records a mobile studio in Botswana, just over the South African border, from 1980 to 1984. Here he re-absorbed and re-used mbaqanga strains, a style he continued to use following his return to South Africa in the early 1990s.

In 1985 Masekela founded the Botswana International School of Music (BISM), which held its first workshop in Gaborone in that year. The event, still in existence, continues as the annual Botswana Music Camp, giving local musicians of all ages and from all backgrounds the opportunity to play and perform together. Masekela taught the jazz course at the first workshop, and performed at the final concert.

Also in the 1980s, Masekela toured with Paul Simon in support of Simon’s album Graceland, which featured other South African artists such as Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Miriam Makeba, Ray Phiri, and other elements of the band Kalahari, with which Masekela recorded in the 1980s. He also collaborated in the musical development for the Broadway play, Sarafina! and recorded with the band Kalahari.

Masekela in Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 2013

In 2003, he was featured in the documentary film Amandla!: A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony. In 2004, he released his autobiography, Still Grazing: The Musical Journey of Hugh Masekela, co-authored with journalist D. Michael Cheers, which detailed Masekela’s struggles against apartheid in his homeland, as well as his personal struggles with alcoholism from the late 1970s through to the 1990s. In this period, he migrated, in his personal recording career, to mbaqanga, jazz/funk, and the blending of South African sounds, through two albums he recorded with Herb Alpert, and solo recordings, Techno-Bush (recorded in his studio in Botswana), Tomorrow (featuring the anthem “Bring Him Back Home”), Uptownship (a lush-sounding ode to American R&B), Beatin’ Aroun de Bush, Sixty, Time, and Revival. His song “Soweto Blues”, sung by his former wife, Miriam Makeba, is a blues/jazz piece that mourns the carnage of the Soweto riots in 1976.He also provided interpretations of songs composed by Jorge Ben, Antônio Car

los Jobim, Caiphus Semenya, Jonas Gwangwa, Dorothy Masuka and Fela Kuti.

In 2006 Masekela was described by Michael A. Gomez, professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at New York University as “the father of South African jazz.”

In 2009, Masekela released the album Phola (meaning “to get well, to heal”), his second recording for 4 Quarters Entertainment/Times Square Records. It includes some songs he wrote in the 1980s but never completed, as well as a reinterpretation of “The Joke of Life (Brinca de Vivre)”, which he recorded in the mid-1980s. From October 2007, he was a board member of the Woyome Foundation for Africa.

In 2010, Masekela was featured, with his son Selema Masekela, in a series of videos on ESPN. The series, called Umlando – Through My Father’s Eyes, was aired in 10 parts during ESPN’s coverage of the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. The series focused on Hugh’s and Selema’s travels through South Africa. Hugh brought his son to the places he grew up. It was Selema’s first trip to his father’s homeland.

On 3 December 2013, Masekela guested with the Dave Matthews Band in Johannesburg, South Africa. He joined Rashawn Ross on trumpet for “Proudest Monkey” and “Grazing in the Grass”.

In 2016, at Emperors Palace, Johannesburg, Masekela and Abdullah Ibrahim performed together for the first time in 60 years, reuniting the Jazz Epistles in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the historic 16 June 1976 youth demonstrations.

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Connie Sawyer – November 27, 1912 – January 21, 2018

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Connie Sawyer (born Rosie Cohen; November 27, 1912 – January 21, 2018) was an American stage, film, and television actress, affectionately nicknamed “The Clown Princess of Comedy”. She had over 140 film and television credits to her name, but was best known for her appearances in Pineapple Express, Dumb and Dumber, and When Harry Met Sally…. At the time of her death, she was the oldest working actress in Hollywood and oldest member of the Screen Actors Guild and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Sawyer’s mother loved showbusiness and encouraged Sawyer to learn singing and dancing, and entered her into talent competitions as a child. In her first competition, a song and dance routine, at the age of 8, she won third prize and was given a stack of pies. She attended Roosevelt High School in Oakland and was the first woman to be senior class president. Following graduation, Sawyer won a radio contest (first place this time) which came with a chance to perform on a radio variety show in San Francisco titled “Al Pearce and His Gang,” a show which gave her the opportunity to develop her own comedy routine.

At the age of 19, Sawyer moved to New York and performed in nightclubs and vaudeville theaters. Sawyer and a few friends worked their way across the country (literally), staying in each city along the way and performing for several weeks. Once in New York she met Sophie Tucker, who connected Sawyer with a comedy writer, and she began to travel with her show. In the 1950s she began to appear on television, including The Milton Berle Show and The Jackie Gleason Show.

In the late 1950s, agent Lillian Small, who worked for Frank Sinatra, saw Sawyer in the Broadway show A Hole in the Head as the character Miss Wexler. Sinatra later optioned the rights for a film version and hired Sawyer to repeat her role in the 1959 film production, which also starred Sinatra, Edward G. Robinson, and Eleanor Parker.

She continued to appear regularly on television, in such series as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laverne & Shirley, The Rockford Files, Hawaii Five-O, Dynasty, Murder, She Wrote, Home Improvement, Seinfeld, Boy Meets World, Will & Grace, Welcome Back, Kotter, ER, How I Met Your Mother, and Ray Donovan. In 2007 Sawyer appeared in the HBO series Tell Me You Love Me with Jane Alexander, however later expressed regret as she considered the show to be pornographic.When she turned 100, in 2012, she was a guest on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.In 2012 she appeared on 2 Broke Girls, in 2013 she appeared on NCIS: Los Angeles and in 2014 she appeared opposite Zooey Deschanel in New Girl as “the Oldest Woman in the World”.

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Naomi Parker Fraley August 26, 1921 – January 20, 2018

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Naomi Parker Fraley (August 26, 1921 – January 20, 2018) was an American war worker and waitress, and considered the likely model for the iconic “We Can Do It!” poster. She was unaware that the poster had become famous and in the interim Geraldine Hoff Doyle was credited as the model. The poster is erroneously referred to as the Rosie the Riveter poster, having become associated with the cultural icon in the 1980s. Fraley was born in Tulsa in Oklahoma in 1921, as the third of eight children to Joseph Parker and Esther Leis. Her father was a mining engineer while her mother was a homemaker and the family moved across the country from New York to California. The family was living in Alameda at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. She and her younger sister, Ada went to work at the Naval Air station, where they were assigned to the machine shop for aircraft assembling duties. In 1942 her photo was taken at a Pratt and Whitney vertical shaper and it appeared in local press including in the Pittsburgh Press on
July 5, 1942. The following year J. Howard Miller’s “We Can Do It!” poster was one of a series that appeared in factories at Westinghouse in a worker morale campaign. Miller could have seen the picture of Fraley at the lathe and it is presumed that the newspaper photo was the source of his image.

In 2011, Fraley was at a reunion held at the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park and there she spotted the 1942 photo of her operating a lathe. She was surprised to find that the caption said that it was Geraldine Hoff Doyle and she wrote to the park to correct their mistake. They thanked her for telling them the correct name for the photo. Doyle had in innocence thought that the photo was of her and by extension she had decided that the poster was too. This mis-identification then became well-established as sources repeated it – an example of the Woozle effect.

Meanwhile Seton Hall University professor James J. Kimble had become interested in the poster which was now an icon of the feminist movement. He tracked down the original photo and found that it was credited to “Naomi Parker” in 1942. Doyle was still at school and she had only worked at the plant for a few weeks. He found Naomi in 2015 to show her the photo and she still had the cutting from 1942. Kimble was certain that she is the woman in the photo, and considers her to be the strongest candidate to be the inspiration for the poster but noted that Miller did not leave any writings which could identify his model.

In February 2015, Kimble interviewed the Parker sisters, now Naomi Fern Fraley, 93, and Ada Wyn Morford, 91, and found that they had known for five years about the incorrect identification of the photo, and had been rebuffed in their attempt to correct the historical record.

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John Stewart Coleman October 15, 1934 – January 20, 2018

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John Stewart Coleman (October 15, 1934 – January 20, 2018) was an American TV weatherman and co-founder of The Weather Channel. He retired from broadcasting in 2014 after nearly 61 years, having worked the last 20 years at KUSI-TV in San Diego.Coleman started his career in 1953 at WCIA in Champaign, Illinois, doing the early evening weather forecast and a local bandstand show called At The Hop while he was a student at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.After receiving his journalism degree in 1957, he became the weather anchor for WCIA’s sister station WMBD-TV in Peoria, Illinois. Coleman was also a weather anchor for KETV in Omaha, WISN-TV in Milwaukee and then WBBM-TV and WLS-TV in Chicago.

In 1972, Coleman and his stage crew craftsmen at WLS-TV created the first chroma key weather map ever in use.

Eyewitness News team, 1972. Back, from left: anchor John Drury, anchor Joel Daly. Front, from left: weatherman John Coleman, anchor Fahey Flynn, sportscaster Bill Frink.

Coleman became the original weatherman on the brand-new ABC network morning program, Good Morning America. He stayed seven years with this top-rated program anchored by David Hartman and Joan Lunden.

In 1981, he persuaded communications entrepreneur Frank Batten to help establish The Weather Channel, serving as TWC’s CEO and President during the start-up and its first year of operation. After being forced out of TWC a year later, Coleman became weather anchor at WCBS-TV in New York and then at WMAQ-TV in Chicago, before moving to Southern California to join the independent television station, KUSI-TV in San Diego in 1994, in what Coleman fondly calls “his retirement job.”Coleman abruptly left KUSI while on vacation in April 2014, with no on-air farewell.

Coleman obtained Professional membership status in the American Meteorological Society and was named AMS Broadcast Meteorologist of the Year in 1983. Coleman said that after ten years of attending AMS National Meetings and studying the papers published in the organization’s journal, he said the AMS was driven by political, not scientific, agendas and dropped out of the AMS.

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Olivia Carlena Cole November 26, 1942 – January 19, 2018

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Olivia Carlena Cole (November 26, 1942 – January 19, 2018) was an American actress.Cole was born in Memphis, Tennessee, the daughter of Arvelia (née Cage), a tennis player and instructor and William Calvin Cole, a worker for Grumman. After graduating from Manhattan’s Hunter College High School in 1960, she studied drama at Bard College in New York and earned a scholarship to attend the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, where she graduated with honors in 1964. After returning to the United States, she earned a master’s degree in theater arts with minor in Scandinavian studies in 1967 from the University of Minnesota.She made her screen debut in the daytime soap opera Guiding Light in 1969 and later appeared in over 30 shows and films.

Cole won an Emmy Award for her performance as Chicken George’s wife, Matilda in the 1977 miniseries Roots.

She was also known for her role as Maggie Rogers in the 1979 miniseries Backstairs at the White House, for which she was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie.Cole became the very first African American actress to win an Emmy award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Television Movie, for her performance as ‘Mathilda’ in Roots.

Cole starred in the CBS sitcoms Szysznyk from 1977-78, and Report to Murphy in 1982. She also was cast in the short-lived ABC drama series Brewster Place with Oprah Winfrey in 1990, and previously appeared in another miniseries North and South, Book I (1985). She also guest-starred on Police Woman, Family, L.A. Law, “Christy” and Murder, She Wrote.

Cole’s Broadway credits include The School for Scandal, You Can’t Take It with You, The Merchant of Venice, and The National Health.

She was an honorary member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. In film, she appeared in Heroes (1977), Coming Home (1978), Some Kind of Hero (1982), Go Tell It on the Mountain (1984), Big Shots (1987), more recently in First Sunday (2008), as well as in the television movies Something About Amelia (1984) and The Women of Brewster Place (1989).

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Dorothy Eloise Maloney January 30, 1924 – January 19, 2018

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Dorothy Eloise Maloney(January 30, 1924 – January 19, 2018)was an American actress.

Her film career began in 1943, and in her early years she played small roles, mainly in B-movies. After a decade, she began to acquire a more glamorous image, particularly after her performance in Written on the Wind (1956), for which she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Her film career reached its peak by the beginning of the 1960s, and she achieved later success with her television role as Constance MacKenzie on Peyton Place from 1964 to 1968. Less active in her later years, Malone’s last screen appearance was in Basic Instinct in 1992.

Malone was born Dorothy Maloney on January 30, 1924 in Chicago, Illinois as one of five children to Robert Ignatius Maloney (1895–1985), an auditor for ATT telephone company and his wife, Esther Emma “Eloise” Smith (1902–1983). Her two sisters died from polio complications. When she was six months old, her family moved to Dallas, Texas. where she modeled for Neiman Marcus and attended high school at Ursuline Academy (Dallas), Highland Park High School (University Park), Hockaday School for Girls (Dallas), and, later, at Southern Methodist University. She originally considered becoming a nurse.

While performing in a play there she was spotted by a talent scout, Eddie Rubin, who had been looking to find and cast a male actor. Malone recalled in 1981,

I was minoring in drama because I always seemed to be in the plays produced in high school and college. … I did some scenes with this boy the agent had found and pictures of the scenes were taken of the boy and also of me. A few weeks later a 13-week contract arrived by mail with a six-year option.

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Stansfield Turner December 1, 1923 – January 18, 2018

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Stansfield Turner (December 1, 1923 – January 18, 2018) was an admiral in the United States Navy who was Director of Central Intelligence from 1977–81, and President of the Naval War College from 1972–74. He was a senior research scholar at the University of Maryland, College Park’s School of Public Policy.

Born in Highland Park, Illinois, Turner graduated from Highland Park High School before attending Amherst College from 1941 to 1943. After joining the United States Naval Reserve, he received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy in 1943 as a member of the Class of 1947; while at Annapolis, he participated in the Navy Midshipmen football program as a guard. Although Turner and fellow transfer student Jimmy Carter were in the same class at the Academy, “the two men barely knew each other at the time.” He received his undergraduate degree and attained a commission in the United States Navy in June 1946; during World War II, students completed an accelerated three-year curriculum.He was a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford while serving in the Navy, earning a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics in 1950 and the Oxbridge M.A. in 1954. During his naval career he served as commanding officer of an ocean mine sweeper (MSO), executive officer of the destroyer USS Morton (DD-948) in 1961 and 1962, and as commanding officer of the guided missile cruiser USS Horne (DLG-30).

He commanded Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 8 as a rear admiral, leading a task group in 1970–1971 consisting of the aircraft carriers Independence and John F. Kennedy monitoring the Soviet Fifth Eskadra in the Mediterranean. He then served as Director, Systems Analysis Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (1971-1972); President of the Naval War College (1972-1974); and Commander, United States Second Fleet, Naval Station Norfolk (1974-1975). After being promoted to admiral in 1975, Turner became NATO Commander-in-Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe, Naples.

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Joseph Henry White November 16, 1946 – January 16, 2018

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Joseph Henry White (November 16, 1946 – January 16, 2018) was an American professional basketball player. As an amateur, he played basketball at the University of Kansas and represented the U.S. men’s basketball team during the 1968 Summer Olympics. As a professional, he is best known for his ten-year stint with the Boston Celtics of the NBA, where he led the team towards two NBA championships and set a franchise record of 488 consecutive games played. White was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2015.

White was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of a Baptist minister, George L. White Sr. and his wife, Elizabeth Rebecca Guynn. As the youngest of seven children, he had three elder sisters; Shirley, Adlean, and Irene, and three elder brothers, George, Dewitt and Ronald. He started playing basketball at six and found sports to be a key platform for his community.As a child, he followed the St. Louis Hawks.

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Bradford Dillman April 14, 1930 – January 16, 2018

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Bradford Dillman (April 14, 1930 – January 16, 2018) was an American actor and author.Bradford Dillman was born on April 14, 1930 in San Francisco, California, the son of Josephine (née Moore) and Dean Dillman, a stockbroker. Bradford’s paternal grandparents were Charles Francis Dillman and Stella Borland Dean. He studied at Town School for Boys and St. Ignatius High School. He later attended the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut, where he became involved in school theatre productions. While at Yale, he enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve in 1948. He graduated from Yale University in 1951 with a BA in English Literature.While a student, he was a member of the Yale Dramat, Fence Club, Torch Honor Society, The Society of Orpheus and Bacchus, WYBC and Berzelius.

After graduation, he entered the United States Marine Corps as an officer candidate, training at Parris Island. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in September 1951. As he was preparing to deploy to Korea, his orders were changed, and he spent the rest of his time in the Marine Corps, 1951 to 1953, teaching communication in the Instructors’ Orientation Course. He was discharged in 1953 at the rank of first lieutenant.

Studying with the Actors Studio, he spent several seasons apprenticing with the Sharon, Connecticut Playhouse before making his professional acting debut in The Scarecrow in 1953.Dillman took his initial Broadway bow in the Eugene O’Neill play Long Day’s Journey Into Night in 1956, playing the author’s alter ego character Edmund Tyrone and winning a Theatre World Award in the process. The production also featured Frederic March, Florence Eldridge and Jason Robards Jr., and ran for 390 performances until 1958.

In 1957, Katharine Cornell cast him in a Hallmark Hall of Fame television production of Robert E. Sherwood’s Pulitzer Prize winning 1940 play, There Shall Be No Night.Dillman was cast in the melodrama A Certain Smile (1958), for which he earned a Golden Globe award. He followed this with In Love and War (1958), a wartime melodrama starring many of 20th Century Fox’s young contract players. It was a box office success. So too was Compulsion (1959), starring Dillman, Dean Stockwell and Orson Welles for producer Richard Zanuck and director Richard Fleischer.

Dillman shared a Best Actor award with co-stars Stockwell and Welles at the Cannes Film Festival. After making A Circle of Deception (1960) in London, Dillman was reunited with Welles, Fleischer and Zanuck for Crack in the Mirror (1960), shot in Paris. It was a flop. Back in Hollywood, Fox cast Dillman in support of Yves Montand and Lee Remick in Sanctuary (1961). They also put him in the title role in Francis of Assisi (1961).When he left Fox, Dillman mostly concentrated on television. He co-starred with Barbara Barrie on The Alfred Hitchcock Hour in the episode “Isabel” (1964) and with Peter Graves in Court Martial (1966). He guest-starred on series such as Ironside, Shane, The Name of the Game, Columbo, Wild Wild West, The Eleventh Hour, Wagon Train, The Greatest Show on Earth, Breaking Point, Mission Impossible, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Barnaby Jones and Three for the Road, and a two part episode of The Man From U.N.C.L.E., which was made into the feature film The Helicopter Spies (1968).

Dillman appeared twice on the Western television series, The Big Valley (1965–69), once on Season 2, episode 15 entitled Day of the Comet and it aired on December 26, 1966, and the second time was on Season 3, episode 9 appearing in the episode entitled A Noose is Waiting which aired on November 13, 1967. He appeared in occasional films during this period such as A Rage to Live (1965), Sergeant Ryker (1968), and The Bridge at Remagen (1969).

Dillman played painter Richard Pickman in the TV adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s 1926 story, “Pickman’s Model”, presented as the opening act of a December 1971 Night Gallery episode.

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Edwin Reuben Hawkins August 19, 1943 – January 15, 2018

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Edwin Reuben Hawkins (August 19, 1943 – January 15, 2018) was an American gospel musician, pianist, choir master, composer, and arranger. He was one of the originators of the urban contemporary gospel sound. He (as leader of the Edwin Hawkins Singers) was probably best known for his arrangement of “Oh Happy Day” (1968–69), which was included on the “Songs of the Century” list. The Edwin Hawkins Singers made a second foray into the charts exactly one year later, backing folk singer Melanie on “Lay Down (Candles in the Rain)”.

Hawkins was born in Oakland, California, on August 19, 1943. At the age of seven Hawkins was already the keyboardist to accompany the family’s gospel choir. Together with Betty Watson, he was the co-founder of the Northern California State Youth Choir of the Church of God in Christ, which included almost fifty members. This ensemble recorded its first album, Let Us Go into the House of the Lord, at the Ephesian Church of God in Christ in Berkeley, California, privately (on the Century 70 custom label), hoping to sell 500 copies. “Oh Happy Day” was just one of the eight songs on the album. The soloists in the album were Elaine Kelly, Margarette Branch, Dorothy Combs Morrison (the lead singer on “Oh Happy Day”), Tramaine Davis (Hawkins), Reuben Franklin, Donald Cashmere, Betty Watson, and Ruth Lyons.

When radio stations of the San Francisco Bay area started playing “Oh Happy Day”, it became very popular. Featuring the lead vocal of Dorothy Combs Morrison, the subsequently released single (on the newly created Pavilion label distributed by Buddah) rocketed to sales of more than a million copies within two months. It crossed over to the pop charts, making U.S. No. 4, UK No. 2, Canada No. 2, No. 2 on the Irish Singles Chart, and No. 1 on the French Singles Charts and the German Singles Charts in 1969. It then became an international success, selling more than 7 million copies worldwide, and Hawkins was awarded his first Grammy for it. Hawkins’ arrangement of the song was eventually covered by The Four Seasons on their 1970 album Half & Half.

Their second Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 charts was the 1970 Melanie single “Lay Down (Candles in the Rain),” on which the label listed the performers as Melanie with The Edwin Hawkins Singers. The song peaked at No. 6 in the U.S. and Top 10 in several others. In 1990, Hawkins, credited as a solo performer, had a number 89 hit on the R&B chart with “If At First You Don’t Succeed (Try Again)”. In the 1992 movie Leap of Faith, Hawkins is the choir master for the gospel songs.

Hawkins died of pancreatic cancer on January 15, 2018, in Pleasanton, California, at the age of 74.

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Dolores O’Riordan September 6, 1971 – January 15, 2018

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Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan (/oʊˈrɪərdən/; 6 September 1971 – 15 January 2018) was an Irish musician and singer-songwriter. She led the rock band The Cranberries for 13 years before the band took a break starting in 2003, reuniting in 2009.

Her first solo album, Are You Listening?, was released in May 2007 and was followed up by No Baggage in 2009. O’Riordan was known for her lilting mezzo-soprano voice, for yodeling and for her strong Limerick accent. She appeared as a judge on RTÉ’s The Voice of Ireland during the 2013–14 season. In April 2014, O’Riordan joined Jetlag (later called D.A.R.K.) and began recording new material.

Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan was born and brought up in the Ballybricken area of County Limerick, Ireland. She was the daughter of Terence and Eileen O’Riordan and the youngest of seven children. She attended Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ school in Limerick.

In 1990 O’Riordan auditioned and won the role of lead singer for a band called The Cranberry Saw Us (later changed to The Cranberries). The band released five albums: Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? (1993), No Need to Argue (1994), To the Faithful Departed (1996), Bury the Hatchet (1999) and Wake Up and Smell the Coffee (2001) and a greatest-hits compilation entitled Stars: The Best of 1992–2002 (2002), before they went on hiatus in 2003.

Throughout the 1990s, O’Riordan was recognised for her changing hairstyles, from shoulder-length to very short crop in myriad colours and shades.[citation needed] She sometimes performed barefoot on stage.

On 25 August 2009, while promoting her solo album No Baggage in New York City on 101.9 RXP radio, O’Riordan announced the reunion of The Cranberries for a world tour. The tour began in North America in mid November, followed by South America in mid January 2010 and Europe in March 2010. Also touring with the original members of The Cranberries was musician Denny DeMarchi, who played the keyboard for O’Riordan’s solo albums.

The band played songs from O’Riordan’s solo albums, many of The Cranberries’ classics, as well as new songs the band had been working on. On 9 June 2010 The Cranberries performed at the Special Olympics opening ceremony at Thomond Park in Limerick. This was the first time the band had performed in their native city in over fifteen years.

On 26 May 2016, the band announced that they planned to start a tour in Europe. The first show was held on 3 June.

On 18 July 1994, O’Riordan married Don Burton, the former tour manager of Duran Duran. The couple had three children. In 1998, the couple bought a 61-hectare (150-acre) stud farm, called Riversfield Stud, located in Kilmallock, County Limerick, selling it six years later in 2004. They then moved to Howth, County Dublin, and spent summers in a log cabin located in Buckhorn, Ontario, Canada. In 2009, the family moved full-time to their home in Buckhorn.

In August 2013, she returned to live in Ireland. She and Burton split up in 2014 after 20 years together, and subsequently divorced.

She was raised as a Roman Catholic. Her mother was a devout Catholic who chose her daughter’s name in reference to the Lady of the Seven Dolours. Dolores admired the late Pope John Paul II. After meeting him inside Vatican City, O’Riordan remarked: “[He] was lovely, very saintly. I was mad about him. I thought he really cared for the poor and he loved to meet the people. I saw him when he came to Limerick, when I was a kid. So it was pretty mindblowing to take my mum out to meet him.” At the invitation of Pope Benedict XVI she performed at the Vatican’s annual Christmas concerts in 2001 and 2002. She performed at the invitation of Pope Francis in 2013 as well.

On 10 November 2014, O’Riordan was arrested and charged in connection with an assault on an Aer Lingus flight from New York to Shannon. An air hostess and a policeman were assaulted and O’Riordan was held in custody following a visit to hospital herself.

In May 2017, she told an interviewer that she had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder two years earlier and had struggled with the symptoms for years.

She was reported to have unspecified back problems, which caused the cancellation in May 2017 of the second part of The Cranberries’ European tour. In late 2017 O’Riordan said she was recovering and performed at a private event.

On 15 January 2018, at the age of 46, while in London, England, for a recording session, O’Riordan died unexpectedly. The cause of death, which occurred in a Westminster hotel, was not immediately made public.

Irish president Michael D. Higgins was one of the first to pay tribute. Other early tributes came in from across the music world, including Dave Davies (of The Kinks), Hozier and Kodaline.

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Daniel Sexton Gurney April 13, 1931 – January 14, 2018

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Daniel Sexton Gurney (April 13, 1931 – January 14, 2018) was an American racing driver, race car constructor, and team owner who reached racing’s highest levels starting in 1958.

Gurney won races in the Formula One, Indy Car, NASCAR, Can-Am, and Trans-Am Series. Gurney is the first of three drivers to have won races in Sports Cars (1958), Formula One (1962), NASCAR (1963), and Indy cars (1967) (the other two being Mario Andretti and Juan Pablo Montoya).

In 1967, after winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans together with A. J. Foyt, he spontaneously sprayed champagne while celebrating on the podium, which thereafter became a custom at many motorsports events. As owner of All American Racers, he was the first to put a simple right-angle extension on the upper trailing edge of the rear wing. This device, called a Gurney flap, increases downforce and, if well designed, imposes only a relatively small increase in aerodynamic drag. At the 1968 German Grand Prix he became the first driver ever to use a full face helmet in Grand Prix racing.

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Hugh Hamilton Wilson, Jr. August 21, 1943 – January 14, 2018

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Hugh Hamilton Wilson, Jr. (August 21, 1943 – January 14, 2018) was an American film director, writer and television showrunner. He is best known as the creator of the TV series WKRP in Cincinnati and Frank’s Place, and as the director of the film comedies Police Academy and The First Wives Club.Wilson was born in Miami, Florida. He attended Coral Way Elementary, Ponce de Leon Jr. High, and Coral Gables Sr. High, where he was a member of the Ching Tang Fraternity. He entered the University of Florida in 1961 and graduated in 1964 with a degree in journalism. At Florida, he was a member of the Blue Key Honor Society and president of his fraternity, Phi Delta Theta. Wilson received the school’s Distinguished Alumnus award in 1982. He has also served as a guest professor of media studies at the University of Virginia.

In 1966, he entered the advertising business in Atlanta at the Burton-Campbell Agency. He was a copywriter before becoming creative director in 1970 and president in 1973. Tom Patchett and Jay Tarses, producers of the Bob Newhart Show, were instrumental in getting Wilson a position with Mary Tyler Moore Productions in 1975. They, along with Grant Tinker, gave him his first writing assignment for the Bob Newhart Show in early 1976 and in 1977 made him a co-producer of the Tony Randall Show. In 1978, Wilson created WKRP in Cincinnati (1978-1982) for CBS. Two of his WKRP scripts won Humanitas Prizes and the show was nominated twice for the Emmy in the Best Comedy category. The character of Bailey Quarters on WKRP was based on Wilson’s wife.Wilson attempted to break into movies by re-writing a low-budget comedy on the condition that he could direct it. The result was the first Police Academy for the Ladd Company (Warners) and producer Paul Maslansky. It was a surprise hit of 1984. In 1985, Wilson shot the singing
cowboy comedy Rustlers’ Rhapsody, starring Tom Berenger and Sela Ward. The movie was filmed in Spain. “I grew up watching Roy and Gene and Hopalong Cassidy,” Wilson said in the production notes. “That was my idea of a movie.” The movie failed at the box office but has gained a strong cult following over the years. The same year, he created the short-lived television series Easy Street starring Loni Anderson. In 1988, Wilson returned to CBS to create and co-produce with Tim Reid the highly regarded but short lived (22 episodes) Frank’s Place. Along with The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd (created by Jay Tarses) the two shows were the first to be done in the style that has come to be known as “dramedy.” Wilson received three Emmy nominations for Frank’s Place and won the Emmy for Best Writing. Wilson also created the CBS show The Famous Teddy Z (1989) and directed the movies Guarding Tess (1994) and Blast from the Past (1999). In 2001, Wilson and John Grisham teamed up to make Mickey, an independent movie about
little league baseball.

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Keith Jackson October 18, 1928 – January 12, 2018

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Keith Max Jackson (October 18, 1928 – January 12, 2018) was an American sportscaster, known for his career with ABC Sports (1966–2006), his intelligent yet folksy coverage of college football (1952–2006), and his distinctive voice, with its deep cadence and operatic tone considered “like Edward R. Murrow reporting on World War II, the voice of ultimate authority in college football.”

The son of a dirt farmer, Jackson was born in Roopville, Georgia and grew up on a farm outside Carrollton, near the Alabama state line. He was the only surviving child in a poor family and grew up listening to sports on the radio. After enlisting and serving as a mechanic in the U.S. Marine Corps, he attended Washington State University in Pullman under the G.I. Bill. Jackson began as a political science major, but he became interested in broadcasting. He graduated in 1954 with a degree in speech communications.

Though best known for his college football broadcasts, Jackson announced numerous other sports for ABC throughout his career, including Major League Baseball, NBA basketball, boxing, auto racing, PGA Tour golf, the USFL, and the Olympic Games. He briefly worked college basketball with Dick Vitale. Jackson also served as the pregame, halftime, and postgame anchor for ABC’s coverage of Super Bowl XXII in 1988. During his on-air tenure, he is credited with nicknaming the Rose Bowl as “The Grandaddy of them All” and Michigan Stadium as “The Big House”

Jackson began his career as a broadcaster in 1952, when he called on radio a game between Stanford and Washington State. He then worked for KOMO radio in Seattle, and later for KOMO-TV from 1954 to 1964 as co-anchor for their first news team (first co-anchor news team on the West Coast) covering Seafair hydroplane races, minor league Seattle Rainiers baseball games, and University of Washington football games. In 1958, Jackson became the first American sports announcer to broadcast an event from the Soviet Union, a crew race between the Washington Huskies and a Soviet team. Despite heavy suspicion and numerous hurdles by the Soviet authorities, Jackson and his cohorts were able to cover the race: the first ever American sports victory on Russian soil.

Jackson became a radio news correspondent for ABC News Radio and sports director of ABC Radio West in 1964 before joining ABC Sports in 1966. He helped Walter Cronkite cover the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco.

In the early 1960s, Jackson covered American Football League games. In 1970, he was chosen to be the first play-by-play announcer on Monday Night Football covering the NFL, but he remained in that capacity only for the program’s first season. Frank Gifford was ABC’s initial target, but could not get out of his CBS contract until after the 1970 season. In 1971, however, Gifford landed the job. Jackson found out that he had been taken off the Monday Night package from 38 messages, not from Roone Arledge himself. This incident led to some contention between Jackson and the brass at ABC. With Gifford’s death in August 2015, Jackson became the last surviving member of the broadcast teams that called MNF games from the early 1970s.

Jackson was the lead play-by-play announcer for the United States Football League broadcasts on ABC from 1983 to 1985. He was paired with Lynn Swann and Tim Brant. He called all three championship games in the league’s short history.

Jackson was a regular part of ABC’s popular Wide World of Sports (WWOS), covering both popular sports and obscure events like wrist wrestling. For WWOS he covered Evel Knievel’s successful jump at Exhibition Stadium, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on August 20, 1974; He also handled WWOS’ first coverage of boxer Sugar Ray Leonard at the North American Continental Boxing Championships on July 26, 1975, who Jackson called a young boxer to watch. He teamed with Jackie Stewart and Chris Economaki in (WWOS) coverage of auto racing; among the notable events covered by Jackson was the 1974 Firecracker 400 at Daytona International Speedway and the 1975 Indianapolis 500.

For all his success, he received the most acclaim for his coverage of college football. He genuinely enjoyed the sport and the purity of it. Jackson began announcing college football when television play-by-play announcers did not always have regular analysts. He would only once miss working a college season in his over 50 years (when he served as play-by-play announcer during the inaugural season of Monday Night Football), beginning in 1952. Jackson was joined in the booth by Joe Paterno for the 1974 Michigan-Ohio State game in Columbus, while Woody Hayes accompanied him for the 1974 Notre Dame-USC game. In his many years covering college football, Jackson was paired with a wide variety of color commentators, including Jackie Jensen (1966–1967), Lee Grosscup (1972–1973), Bud Wilkinson (1969–1975), Ara Parseghian (1975–1980), Frank Broyles (1978–1985), Lynn Swann (1984–1985), Tim Brant (1986, 2001–2002), Bob Griese (1987–1999), and Dan Fouts (2002–2005). Jackson called 16 Sugar Bowls and 15 Rose Bowls during his time at ABC.

For many years, he was assigned by ABC to the primary national game of the week. His quirky expressions such as “Whoa, Nellie!”, “Fum-BLE!” and “Hold the phonnnnne!” (following a penalty flag) are often the subject of comedic imitation. Though he greatly popularized it, Jackson notes that he learned the term “Whoa, Nellie” from earlier television announcer Dick Lane. He has often referred to offensive and defensive line players as the Big Uglies, or to an individual by saying “That guy…is a hus” (horse). Jackson is also credited with coining the nickname for Michigan Stadium, The Big House. In the season before his first retirement, during what was thought to be his final game at The Big House, the Michigan Marching Band’s halftime show concluded by spelling out “Thanks Keith” across the field. The 111,019 fans turned toward the press box, stood up and cheered for the commentator. As a part of the halftime event former Michigan coach Bo Schembechler presented Jackson with a jersey with “The Big House” across the front and a Michigan football helmet.

During the mid-’80s, he began falling out of favor with ABC executives due to the rise of stars such as Al Michaels and Jim Lampley. Jackson’s contract expired after the 1986 Sugar Bowl. He had a 3-month “retirement” until new ABC Sports President Dennis Swanson personally offered him a 3-year contract, which he accepted.

In the 1990s, Jackson recorded videos for the centennial of the Alabama Crimson Tide. In 2006, Jackson introduced the Nebraska Cornhuskers’ “Tunnel Walk” video on the stadium “HuskerVision” screens. This video played before every home game at Memorial Stadium in the 2006 season. It was also used for one home game in 2007, against Texas A&M. On September 26, 2009, for the 300th consecutive sellout of Memorial Stadium, Jackson again provided a video tribute to the fans of Nebraska.

Jackson’s connections to the University of Nebraska remain strong. It was Jackson himself that the university contacted when designing its new press box facility—Jackson’s advice included a recommendation that it include a separate restroom inside the broadcast booth, as few if any broadcast booths had any suitable restroom facilities. When Jackson broadcast the Nebraska-California game the following season (the debut of the Cornhuskers’ new pressbox), he found a restroom in the booth with a sign reading “The Keith Jackson Memorial Bippy.” The sign was a joke from Jackson’s longtime friend, Nebraska sports information director Don Bryant. The name stuck, and a permanent plaque was put up next to the restroom door that reads “The Keith Jackson Toilet Facility – Dedicated Sept 11, 1999”.

Jackson would call the 1972 USC Trojans football team the greatest team he ever saw. Jackson, who was in his first year in ABC football broadcasting narrating the taped highlights of the 1967 USC vs. UCLA football game, declared it many years later to be the greatest game he has ever seen.

Jackson’s career was not free of incidents. During the 1978 Gator Bowl, Jackson missed Ohio State Head Coach Woody Hayes’ infamous punch of Clemson defensive lineman Charlie Bauman. Bauman had intercepted a pass and was pushed out of bounds on the Ohio State sidelines, and a frustrated Hayes threw a forearm at Bauman’s throat. Jackson (and color commentator Ara Parseghian) failed to see or comment on Hayes’ actions, which had been captured from a different vantage point on camera. No replay of the actual incident was available in the booth during the telecast, as the television crew was working with limited replay capability. In addition to this, no sideline reporter was available to provide information on the cause of the unsportsmanlike penalties that occurred as a result. This led to accusations that Jackson was protecting Hayes, who was later fired for the incident.

Approaching his 70th birthday, Jackson announced his first retirement from college football at the end of the 1998 season and his intention to live full-time at his home in California. Choosing the first BCS National Championship Game as his last broadcast, Jackson called the 1999 National Championship at the Fiesta Bowl between Tennessee and Florida State. He concluded the program by stating “Tennessee 23, Florida State 16. And so it is done. I say goodbye to all of you. God bless and good night.”

Jackson rescinded his decision the following fall and began to do a more limited schedule of games, teamed with Dan Fouts, Tim Brant, and later Fouts again, almost exclusively sticking to venues on the West Coast, closer to his home in California. Two notable exceptions were the 2003 Michigan–Ohio State and the 2005 Oklahoma vs. Texas football game. Each was the 100th meeting between the two archrivals. He strongly hinted that he was interested in retiring for good after the 2005 season, telling The New York Times that he was feeling his age after 53 seasons and had become upset at the increased number of mistakes in his play calling in the last few years. ABC tried convincing Jackson to stay, but his decision was firm. He officially announced his retirement on April 27, 2006, noting he didn’t want to die in a stadium parking lot. His last game call was the 2006 Rose Bowl featuring Texas vs. Southern California in the BCS National Championship Game. The game was the last college football game for ABC Sports as a separate corporate division, as it was integrated with ESPN the following summer and is now known as ESPN on ABC.

Jackson was a long-time resident of California. He and his wife, Turi Ann Johnsen, had three children, Melanie Ann, Lindsey and Christopher. At the time of his death, he resided in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles. On the subject of writing a book, Jackson admitted that he’d considered it, but joked that he would only sit down and work on one if he were to ever lose his golf swing.

Jackson died on the night of January 12, 2018.

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John Tunney June 26, 1934 – January 12, 2018

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John Varick Tunney (June 26, 1934 – January 12, 2018) was a United States Senator and Representative from the state of California.

He was the son of heavyweight boxing champion Gene Tunney and Connecticut socialite Polly Lauder Tunney. He grew up on the family’s Star Meadow Farm in Stamford, Connecticut and attended New Canaan Country School and the Westminister prep school.

Tunney graduated from Yale University with a degree in anthropology, where he was a member of St. Anthony Hall, in 1956. He attended the Hague Academy of International Law in the Netherlands and graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1959, where he was a roommate of future Massachusetts senator Ted Kennedy, who remained a close friend. Tunney was admitted to the Virginia and New York bars in 1959 and practiced law in New York City. Tunney married his first wife, Mieke Sprengers, on February 5, 1959.

Tunney joined the United States Air Force as a judge advocate and served until he was discharged as a captain in April 1963. He taught business law at the University of California, Riverside in 1961 and 1962. In 1963 he was admitted to practice law in California. He was a special adviser to the President’s Committee on Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Crime from 1963 until 1968.

In 1964, Tunney was elected as a Democrat in the U.S. House of Representatives from California’s 38th congressional district (Riverside and Imperial counties). He served from January 3, 1965 until his resignation on January 2, 1971 when he became a senator. Noting his service to the state, Tunney was made an honorary member of Phi Sigma Kappa by that fraternity’s Cal State Northridge chapter in 1970.

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Edgar Ray Killen January 17, 1925 – January 11, 2018

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Edgar Ray Killen (January 17, 1925 – January 11, 2018) was a Ku Klux Klan organizer who planned and directed the murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner, three civil rights activists participating in the Freedom Summer of 1964. He was found guilty in state court of three counts of manslaughter on June 21, 2005, the forty-first anniversary of the crime, and sentenced to 60 years in prison. He appealed against the verdict, but the sentence was upheld on April 12, 2007, by the Supreme Court of Mississippi. He died in prison on January 11, 2018, six days before his 93rd birthday.

Edgar Ray Killen was born in Philadelphia, Mississippi, as the eldest of eight children to Lonnie Ray Killen (1901–1992) and Etta Killen (née Hitt; 1903–1983). Killen was a sawmill operator and a part-time minister. He was a kleagle, or klavern recruiter and organizer, for the Neshoba and Lauderdale County chapters of the Ku Klux Klan.

During the “Freedom Summer” of 1964, James Chaney, 21, a young black man from Meridian, Mississippi and Andrew Goodman, 20, and Michael Schwerner, 24, two Jewish men from New York, were murdered in Philadelphia, Mississippi. Killen, along with Cecil Price, then deputy sheriff of Neshoba County, was found to have assembled a group of armed men who conspired against, pursued, and killed the three civil rights workers. Samuel Bowers, who served as the Grand Wizard of the local White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and had ordered the murders to take place, acknowledged that Killen was “the main instigator”.

At the time of the murders, the state of Mississippi made little effort to prosecute the guilty parties. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), under pro-civil-rights President Lyndon B. Johnson and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, conducted a vigorous investigation. A federal prosecutor, John Doar, circumventing dismissals by federal judges, convened a grand jury in December 1964. In November 1965 Solicitor General Thurgood Marshall appeared before the Supreme Court to defend the federal government’s authority in bringing charges. Eighteen men, including Killen, were arrested and charged with conspiracy to violate the victims’ civil rights in United States v. Price.

The trial, which began in 1966 at the federal courthouse of Meridian before an all-white jury, convicted seven conspirators, including the deputy sheriff, and acquitted eight others. It was the first time a white jury convicted a white official of civil rights killings. For three men, including Killen, the trial ended in a hung jury, with the jurors deadlocked 11–1 in favor of conviction. The lone holdout said that she could not convict a preacher. The prosecution decided not to retry Killen and he was released. None of the men found guilty would serve more than six years in prison.

More than 20 years later, Jerry Mitchell, an award-winning investigative reporter for The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi, wrote extensively about the case for six years. Mitchell helped to secure convictions in other high-profile Civil Rights Era murder cases, including the assassination of Medgar Evers, the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, and the murder of Vernon Dahmer. Mitchell assembled new evidence regarding the murders of the three civil rights workers. He also located new witnesses and pressured the state to take action. Assisting Mitchell were high school teacher Barry Bradford and a team of three students from Illinois.

The students persuaded Killen to do his only taped interview (to that point) about the murders. That tape showed Killen clinging to his segregationist views and competent and aware. The student-teacher team found more potential witnesses, created a website, lobbied the United States Congress, and focused national media attention on reopening the case. Carolyn Goodman, the mother of one of the victims, called them “super heroes”.

In 2004 Killen declared that he would attend a petition-drive on his behalf, which was to be conducted by the Nationalist Movement at the 2004 Mississippi Annual State Fair in Jackson. The Nationalist Movement opposed communism, integration and non-speedy trials. The Hinds County sheriff, Malcolm MacMillan, conducted a counter-petition, calling for a re-opening of the state case against Killen. Killen was arrested for three counts of murder on January 6, 2005. He was freed on bond. His case drew comparisons to that of Byron De La Beckwith, who was charged with the killing of Medgar Evers in 1963 and re-arrested in 1994.

Killen’s trial was scheduled for April 18, 2005. It was deferred after the 80-year-old Killen broke both of his legs while chopping lumber at his rural home in Neshoba County. The trial began on June 13, 2005, with Killen attending in a wheelchair. He was found guilty of manslaughter on June 21, 2005, 41 years to the day after the crime. The jury, consisting of nine white jurors and three black jurors, rejected the charges of murder, but found him guilty of recruiting the mob that carried out the killings. He was sentenced on June 23, 2005, by Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon to the maximum sentence of 60 years in prison, 20 years for each count of manslaughter, to be served consecutively. He would have been eligible for parole after serving at least 20 years. At the sentencing, Gordon stated that each life lost was valuable, and he said that the law made no distinction of age for the crime and that the maximum sentence should be imposed regardless of Killen’s age. Prosecuting the case were Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood and Neshoba County District Attorney Mark Duncan.

On August 12, Killen was released from prison on a $600,000 appeal bond. He claimed that he could no longer use his right hand (using his left hand to place his right one on the Bible during his swearing-in) and that he was permanently confined to his wheelchair. Gordon said he was convinced by the testimony that Killen was neither a flight risk nor a danger to the community. On September 3, The Clarion-Ledger reported that a deputy sheriff saw Killen walking around “with no problem”. At a hearing on September 9, several other deputies testified to seeing Killen driving in various locations. One deputy said that Killen shook hands with him using his right hand. Gordon revoked the bond and ordered Killen back to prison, saying that he believed Killen had committed a fraud against the court.

On March 29, 2006, Killen was moved from his prison cell to a City of Jackson hospital to treat complications from the severe leg injury that he sustained in the 2005 logging incident. On August 12, 2007, the Supreme Court of Mississippi affirmed Killen’s conviction by a vote of 8–0 (one judge not participating).

Killen entered the Mississippi Department of Corrections system on June 27, 2005, to serve his sixty-year sentence (three twenty-year sentences running consecutively). That same year, after a circuit court judge denied Killen’s request for a new trial, he was sent to the Central Mississippi Correctional Facility (CMCF) in an unincorporated area of Rankin County, near Pearl. He underwent evaluation, and prison officials were deciding whether to keep him at CMCF or to send him to the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman, an unincorporated community in Sunflower County. Killen’s tentative release date was around September 1, 2027 (by which time he would have been 102 years old). His location last changed on July 29, 2014.

On February 25, 2010, the Associated Press reported that Killen filed a lawsuit against the FBI. The suit alleged that one of Killen’s lawyers in his 1967 trial, Clayton Lewis, was an FBI informant, and that the FBI hired “gangster and killer” Gregory Scarpa to coerce witnesses. On February 18, 2011 U.S. Magistrate F. Keith Ball recommended that the lawsuit be dismissed. On March 23, 2011, District Judge Daniel P. Jordan, III, adopted the magistrate’s report and dismissed the case.

James Hart Stern, a black preacher from California, shared a prison cell with Edgar Ray Killen from August 2010 to November 2011. During that time, Killen and Stern forged a close relationship and Killen hand wrote dozens of letters to Stern outlining his views on race as well as confessing to other crimes. In addition to the letters, the former leader of the KKK signed over power of attorney and his land in Mississippi to his cellmate.[20] Stern detailed his experience in the 2017 book Killen the KKK, co-authored by North Carolina author Autumn K. Robinson. Using his power of attorney, Rev. Stern disbanded Killen’s incarnation of the KKK on January 5, 2016.

On January 12, 2018, it was announced that he had died at the age of 92 at 9 pm local time at the Mississippi State Penitentiary in Parchman, Mississippi. He was six days shy of his 93rd birthday.

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Doreen Tracey April 13, 1943 – January 10, 2018

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Doreen Isabelle Tracey (April 13, 1943 – January 10, 2018) was a British-born American performer who appeared on the original Mickey Mouse Club television show from 1955-58.

Tracey was born in St Pancras, London, England. Her parents, Sidney Tracey and Bessie Hay, were an American vaudeville dance team that performed for Allied soldiers during World War II. Her father’s original name was Murray Katzelnick. He immigrated to the United States from Russia with his Jewish parents as an infant.

When Doreen was four, her family returned to the United States, where her father first ran a nightclub, then opened a dance studio in Hollywood, California. She learned to dance and sing at an early age, courtesy of the many instructors and performers who worked out at her father’s studio. Her first professional work was an uncredited singing and dancing bit in the musical film The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953). At age twelve she auditioned for the Mickey Mouse Club and was hired. She appeared for all three seasons of the show’s original run.

In 1956, she was featured in the Disney western Westward Ho, the Wagons!, and in the third season of the Mickey Mouse Club, had a role in the serial Annette. She was cast as Scraps, the Patchwork Girl, in a musical number from the proposed live-action Disney film Rainbow Road to Oz on an episode of the Disneyland television show in September 1957. The movie was never made, and when the Mickey Mouse Club stopped filming in 1958, Tracey switched to singing live at concerts and teen nightclubs.

She appeared on several television shows, including the episode “April Fool” (April 1, 1959), of ABC’s The Donna Reed Show, with James Darren in a guest-starring role as well. She wound up her career as a performer touring American military bases in South Vietnam and Thailand and performing lead vocals for a rock group called Doreen and the Invaders.

She later worked for Frank Zappa as a publicist and became an amateur weightlifter. She twice posed nude for the men’s magazine Gallery in 1976, and again, in 1979. In 2001 an excerpt from her memoirs, Confessions of a Mouseketeer, was published in the NPR anthology I Thought My Father Was God. She married Robert Washburn and had a son, but the marriage ended in divorce.

Tracey died of pneumonia as a result of a two-year battle with cancer, at the age of 74.

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Charles Bernard Sanders March 10, 1920 – January 8, 2018

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Charles Bernard Sanders March 10, 1920 – January 8, 2018 – Charles Bernard Sanders, 97, passed away on January 8, 2018 in Stuart, Florida.

Born in West Point, Iowa, Mr. Sanders had previously lived in East Lansing, Michigan for 48 years before moving to the Stuart area in 1994.

Mr. Sanders was a veteran of the United States Army Air Force and later graduated with a business degree from Iowa State University. He was an accountant for 45 years. Mr. Sanders was a member of St. Christopher Catholic Church in Hobe Sound and sang in the choir for several years. He also volunteered at St. Vincent De Paul in Hobe Sound for many years.

He is survived by his 6 children, daughter, Terry Klein (Chuck) of Reno, NV; son, Charles J. Sanders (Maria) of Port St. Lucie, FL; son, David Sanders (Kelly) of Longmont CO; son, Gregg Sanders (Sue) of Fort Collins, CO, daughter, Cinderella Sanders (Ken) of Danville CA; daughter, Marsha Sanders (Dennis-Deceased) of Hollister,CA; 12 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren.

Mr. Sanders was predeceased by his wife Jane Elizabeth Sanders in 2001; 2 brothers (Leon Sanders and Hank Sanders), sister (Rosemary Sanders) and sole surviving sister (Margo Sanders).

A Mass of Christian Burial will take place on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at St. Christopher Catholic Church in Hobe Sound, FL at 10:00 AM.

Memorial contributions may be made to American Glaucoma Society or the American Macular Degeneration Foundation in Mr. Sanders’ name.

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Clara M. Russell June 02, 1942 – January 06, 2018

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Clara M. Russell June 02, 1942 – January 06, 2018 – Our precious Mother, Clara Maria Melgiovanni Russell has gone to heavenly sleep, resting peacefully amongst the angels. Clara passed away at her home in Palm City in the care of her loving family at 1:15 am on January 6, 2018. She, along with her devoted children, was the owner of the acclaimed Ristorante Claretta.

Clara was born on June 2, 1942 in Rome, Italy. Following the end of WWII, the family returned to their native hometown of Lago Maggiore. Clara spent the majority of her life raising her own family there until 1997. As a young student she attended the University of Pavia and earned a degree in Language. It is no accident that she was a gifted communicator. She had a remarkable style and ability that embraced people. If you went to Ristorante Claretta one time, or a hundred times, you would have been greeted with a sincere and genuine ‘Ciao Bella’ and warm European kiss. As you left the restaurant you would have left the same way you walked in, feeling like you were part of her family. She had a special affection for her restaurant family. Forever, when you visit this fine establishment, one thing will be certain, you will feel her presence, for that legacy, her legacy, resides there, in her children. Clara Per Sempre!

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“Dave” Toschi July 11, 1931 – January 6, 2018

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David Ramon “Dave” Toschi (July 11, 1931 – January 6, 2018) was an inspector in the San Francisco Police Department, where he served from 1952 to 1987. From 1966 to 1978 he was assigned to the S.F.P.D. homicide detail. He is best known for his role as a chief investigator in the Zodiac Killer case, which he and partner, Inspector Bill Armstrong, began to work on after the murder of taxi driver Paul Stine.

Shortly after he left the S.F.P.D., Dave was the Director of Security for St. Luke’s Hospital in San Francisco’s Mission District. Toschi was vice president of North Star Security Services in Daly City. He was an advisor to the producers of the 2007 film Zodiac.

Actor Mark Ruffalo portrayed Toschi in the David Fincher film Zodiac.

George Lucas gave an interview to Empire magazine once stating that the Zodiac murders captured his imagination at the time as a high schooler and then college student at USC, and he always felt like Toschi was harshly judged for how the investigation was handled. He explained this is why he named a location on Tatooine Tosche Station, “in honor of the SFPD inspector.”

Steve McQueen copied Toschi’s distinctive style of quick-draw shoulder-holster by wearing his gun upside down for the 1968 movie Bullitt. McQueen also modeled much of his Bullitt character on Toschi.

Screenwriters Harry Julian Fink and R. M. Fink also modeled Harry Callahan, the main character of Dirty Harry portrayed by Clint Eastwood, on Toschi; the film’s villain, based on the Zodiac Killer, was called “The Scorpio Killer” (portrayed by Andrew J. Robinson).

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Raymond Thomas December 29, 1941 – January 4, 2018

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Raymond Thomas (29 December 1941 – 4 January 2018) was an English musician, flautist, singer and composer in the UK rock band The Moody Blues. His flute solo on the band’s 1967 hit single “Nights in White Satin” is regarded as one of prog rock’s “defining moments.”

Thomas was born at an emergency maternity unit set up during World War II in Lickhill Manor, Stourport-on-Severn, England. His father’s family was from the southwest corner of Wales. At the age of 9, his father taught him to play harmonica and this sparked his interest in music. He joined the school choir a year later. He quit schooling at the age of 14, and briefly left music to work as a tool maker trainee at Lemarks. By the age of 16, he had embarked on a search for a music band and within two years had left his trade to pursue a career in music.

In the 1960s, Thomas joined the Birmingham Youth Choir then began singing with various Birmingham blues and soul groups including The Saints and Sinners and The Ramblers. He was inspired to learn the flute from a grandfather who played the instrument. Taking up the harmonica he started a band, El Riot and the Rebels, with bassist John Lodge. After a couple of years their friend Mike Pinder joined as keyboardist. On Easter Monday 1963 the band opened for The Beatles at the Bridge Hotel, Tenbury Wells. Thomas and Pinder were later in a band called Krew Cats, formed in 1963, who played in Hamburg and at other music venues in northern Germany.

Thomas and Pinder then recruited guitarist Denny Laine, drummer Graeme Edge, and bassist Clint Warwick to form a new, blues-based band, The Moody Blues. Signed to Decca Records, their first album, The Magnificent Moodies, yielded a No. 1 UK hit (No. 10 in the US) with “Go Now”. Thomas sang lead vocals on George and Ira Gershwin’s “It Ain’t Necessarily So” from the musical Porgy and Bess. His flute featured on three songs on the album—”Something You Got”, “I’ve Got a Dream”, and “Let Me Go”—as well as the single “From the Bottom of My Heart”,

When Warwick left the band (followed by Laine a few months later) he was briefly replaced by Rod Clark. Thomas then suggested his and Pinder’s old bandmate John Lodge as a permanent replacement and also recruited Justin Hayward to replace Laine. With this line-up the band released seven successful albums between 1967 and 1972 and became known for their pioneering orchestral sound.

Although they initially tried to continue singing R&B covers and novelty tunes, they were confronted over this by an audience member, and with their finances deteriorating they made a conscious decision to focus only on their own original material.

Following the lead of Pinder, Hayward, and Lodge, Thomas also started writing songs. The first he contributed to the group’s repertoire were “Another Morning” and “Twilight Time” on Days of Future Passed. The album is regarded a prog rock landmark, and Thomas’s flute solo on the single “Nights in White Satin” one of its defining moments. His flute would become an integral part of the band’s music, even as Pinder started to use the Mellotron keyboard. Thomas has stated that a number of his compositions on the band’s earlier albums were made in a studio broom closet, with Thomas writing songs on a glockenspiel. Hayward has spoken of Thomas’s learning transcendental meditation in 1967, along with other members of the group.

Thomas and Pinder both acted as the band’s onstage MCs, as heard on the live album Caught Live + 5 and seen in the Live at the Isle of Wight Festival DVD. Thomas started to become a more prolific writer for the group, penning songs such as “Legend of a Mind”—an ode to LSD guru and friend of the band,Timothy Leary, and a popular live favourite—and “Dr. Livingstone, I Presume” for In Search of the Lost Chord, “Dear Diary” and “Lazy Day” for On the Threshold of a Dream as well as co-writing “Are You Sitting Comfortably?” with Hayward.

The Moody Blues formed their own record label Threshold Records, distributed by Decca in the UK and London in the US, and their first album on the Threshold imprint was To Our Children’s Children’s Children, a concept album about eternal life. Thomas wrote and sang lead vocal on “Floating” and “Eternity Road”.

When the band began to realize that their method of heavy overdubbing in the studio made most of the songs very difficult to reproduce in concert, they decided to use a more stripped-down sound on their next album A Question of Balance, to be able to play as many songs live as possible. It was their second UK No. 1 album. Thomas wrote and sang “And the Tide Rushes In”, reportedly written after having a row with his wife, and was credited with co-writing the album’s final track “The Balance” with Edge, while Pinder recited the story.

The Moodies went back to their symphonic sound and heavy overdubbing with Every Good Boy Deserves Favour, their third UK No. 1 album, and Thomas wrote and sang “Our Guessing Game” and “Nice to Be Here”, also singing a co-lead vocal with Pinder, Hayward and Lodge on Edge’s “After You Came”. All five members wrote “Procession”.

The final album of the ‘core seven’ was Seventh Sojourn, their first album to reach No. 1 in the USA. By this time, Pinder had replaced his mellotron with the chamberlin, which produced orchestral sounds more realistically and easily than the mellotron. Thomas wrote and sang “For My Lady”

Thomas died on 4 January 2018, at his home in Surrey, at the age of 76. The official announcement, made by his record company, did not give any cause.

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John Young September 24, 1930 – January 5, 2018

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John Watts Young (September 24, 1930 – January 5, 2018) was an American astronaut, naval officer and aviator, test pilot, and aeronautical engineer. He became the ninth person to walk on the Moon as Commander of the Apollo 16 mission in 1972. Young enjoyed the longest career of any astronaut, becoming the first person to fly six space missions (with seven launches, counting his lunar liftoff) over the course of 42 years of active NASA service. He was the only person to have piloted, and been commander of, four different classes of spacecraft: Gemini, the Apollo Command/Service Module, the Apollo Lunar Module, and the Space Shuttle.

In 1965, Young flew on the first manned Gemini mission, and commanded another Gemini mission the next year. In 1969 during Apollo 10, he became the first person to fly solo around the Moon. He drove the Lunar Roving Vehicle on the Moon’s surface during Apollo 16, and is one of only three people to have flown to the Moon twice. He also commanded two Space Shuttle flights, including its first launch in 1981, and served as Chief of the Astronaut Office from 1974 to 1987. Young retired from NASA in 2004. He died on January 5, 2018.

Young was born in San Francisco, California, on September 24, 1930, to parents William Hugh Young, a civil engineer and Wanda Howland Young. At 18 months old, due to the Great Depression, he moved with his family to Cartersville, Georgia, then to Orlando, Florida, where he attended grade school and later Orlando High School until graduating in 1948. Young was a Boy Scout and earned the rank of Second Class.

Young earned a Bachelor of Science degree with highest honors in Aeronautical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1952; while attending, he became a member of the national military honor society Scabbard and Blade and Sigma Chi fraternity.

After graduating from Georgia Tech in 1952, Young entered the United States Navy through the Navy ROTC and was commissioned on June 6, 1952, as an ensign. He served as fire control officer on the destroyer USS Laws until June 1953 and completed a tour in the Sea of Japan during the Korean War. Following this assignment, he was sent to flight training. In January 1954, he was designated a Navy helicopter pilot. After receiving his aviator wings on December 20, 1954, he was assigned to Fighter Squadron 103 (VF-103) for four years, flying Grumman F-9 Cougars from USS Coral Sea and Vought F-8 Crusaders from USS Forrestal.

After training at the United States Naval Test Pilot School in 1959 with the Class 23, Young was assigned to the Naval Air Test Center at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, for three years. His test projects included evaluations of the XF8U-3 Crusader III and F-4 Phantom II fighter weapons systems. In 1962, he set two world time-to-climb records while flying his Phantom II, attaining 3,000 meters (9,843 ft) from a standing start in 34.52 seconds and 25,000 meters (82,021 ft) from a standing start in 227.6 seconds. He also served as maintenance officer of Fighter Squadron 143 (VF-143) from April to September 1962.

Fellow astronaut Charles Bolden described Young and Robert “Hoot” Gibson as the two best pilots he had met during his aviation career: “Never met two people like them. Everyone else gets into an airplane; John and Hoot wear their airplane. They’re just awesome”. Young retired from the Navy as a Captain in September 1976, after 25 years.

oining NASA in 1962, Young was the first of the Astronaut Group 2 to fly in space, replacing Thomas P. Stafford as pilot of Gemini 3 when Alan Shepard, the original command pilot, was grounded due to Ménière’s disease. Making the first manned flight of the Gemini spacecraft with Gus Grissom in 1965, Young scored another space first by smuggling a corned beef sandwich onto the spacecraft—a feat for which he was reprimanded. Some members of the US House of Representatives were not pleased about the stunt, claiming that Young cost tax payers millions of dollars by disrupting a scheduled test of space food during the flight.

Young then trained as backup pilot for Gemini 6A. The assignment of Gemini 7 backup command pilot Ed White to Apollo, created an opening for Young as commander of Gemini 10 in 1966. The mission was the first to perform a rendezvous with two Agena target vehicles; and his pilot, Michael Collins, performed two spacewalks.

In 1966, Young was assigned to an Apollo crew as Command Module pilot, with Commander Thomas Stafford and Lunar Module pilot Eugene Cernan. This crew was assigned as backup to the second manned Apollo mission, planned before the Apollo 1 fire. After that fire, both crews were assigned to the first actual manned mission, Apollo 7, which flew in October 1968. In May 1969, this crew flew to the Moon on Apollo 10. While Stafford and Cernan flew the Lunar Module in lunar orbit for the first time, Young flew the Command Module solo. Apollo 10 set the record for the highest speed attained by any manned vehicle at 39,897 kilometres per hour (24,791 mph) during its return to Earth on May 26, 1969.

Young was backup commander of Apollo 13, the troubled mission in which the Moon landing was aborted because of an explosion in the Service Module.

By rotation, Young became commander of Apollo 16, and studied geology with his crew while preparing for the mission. Apollo 16’s lunar landing was almost aborted when a malfunction was detected in the SPS engine control system in the Service Module. It was determined that the problem could be worked around, and the mission continued. On the surface, Young took three moonwalks in the Descartes Highlands with Charles Duke on April 21, 22 and 23, 1972, making Young the ninth person to walk on the surface of the Moon, while Ken Mattingly flew the Command Module in lunar orbit.

Young’s final assignment in Apollo was as the backup commander for Cernan on Apollo 17. The backup crew was originally the Apollo 15 crew, but Deke Slayton removed them from the assignment when he learned they had taken a small statue to the moon, as well as stamps that they sold to a dealer.

In January 1973 Young was made Chief of the Space Shuttle Branch of the Astronaut Office. In January 1974, he became Chief of the Astronaut Office after the retirement of Alan Shepard.

Young flew two missions of the Space Shuttle, both aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. He commanded the program’s 1981 maiden orbital flight, STS-1, and in 1983 commanded STS-9, which carried the first Spacelab module. In 1986 he was in line to make a record seventh space flight on STS-61-J to deploy the Hubble Space Telescope, but the Challenger disaster earlier that year had delayed NASA’s schedule.

Young was openly critical of NASA management following the Challenger disaster, and in April 1987 was made Special Assistant to JSC Director Aaron Cohen for Engineering, Operations and Safety. NASA denied that his criticism triggered the move, although Young and industry insiders believed that was the reason for the reassignment. In February 1996, he was assigned as Associate Director (Technical) JSC.

During his NASA career, Young logged more than 15,000 hours of training, mostly in simulators, to prepare for positions on eleven spaceflights in prime and backup crew positions.

Young worked for NASA for 42 years and announced his retirement on December 7, 2004. He retired on December 31, 2004, at the age of 74, but continued to attend the Monday Morning Meeting at the Astronaut Office at JSC for several years thereafter. He logged more than 15,275 hours flying time in props, jets, helicopters, and rocket jets; more than 9,200 hours in T-38s; and 835 hours in spacecraft during six space flights.

On April 12, 2006, Young appeared at the 25th anniversary of the STS-1 launch at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, along with pilot Robert Crippen. The two spoke of their experiences during the flight.

In 2012, Young published an autobiography, Forever Young.

Young married Barbara White of Savannah, Georgia, and they had two children, Sandra and John. They were divorced in 1972 after 16 years of marriage. He later married Susy Feldman, and lived in El Lago, Texas, a suburb of Houston.

Young died on January 5, 2018, at his home in Houston of complications from pneumonia. He was 87.

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Jerry Van Dyke July 27, 1931 – January 5, 2018

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Jerry McCord Van Dyke (July 27, 1931 – January 5, 2018) was an American actor and comedian, as well as the younger brother of Dick Van Dyke.

He made his television acting debut on The Dick Van Dyke Show with several guest appearances as Rob Petrie’s brother, Stacey. Later in his career from 1989 to 1997, he portrayed Luther Van Dam on the ABC sitcom Coach.

Van Dyke was born in Danville, Illinois, in 1931 to Hazel Victoria (née McCord; 1896–1992), a stenographer, and Loren Wayne “Cookie” Van Dyke (1898–1976), a salesman.He was of Dutch, English, and Scottish descent. His mother was a Mayflower descendant.

Van Dyke pursued his stand-up comedy career while still in Danville High School, and was already a veteran of strip joints and nightclubs when he joined the United States Air Force Tops In Blue in 1954 and 1955. During the mid-1950s, Van Dyke worked at WTHI-TV in Terre Haute, Indiana. The Jerry Van Dyke Show, which included future CBS News Early Show news anchor Joseph Benti, Nancee South and Ben Falber, was popular fare. In the service, he performed at military bases around the world, twice winning the All Air Force Talent Show.

Following his first guest appearances on The Dick Van Dyke Show and two others on CBS’s The Ed Sullivan Show, CBS made him a regular on The Judy Garland Show. He was also given hosting chores on the 1963 game show Picture This. In that same year, movie audiences saw him in supporting roles in the films McLintock!, Palm Springs Weekend and The Courtship of Eddie’s Father.

In 1963, Van Dyke was cast on an episode of the CBS anthology series GE True, hosted by Jack Webb. When The Judy Garland Show was unsuccessfully revamped, Van Dyke left the program. He turned down the offer to play Gilligan on Gilligan’s Island, a role which went instead to Bob Denver. He rejected as well an offer to replace Don Knotts as Sheriff Andy Taylor’s deputy on The Andy Griffith Show. Van Dyke finally accepted the lead role of attorney David Crabtree in the short-lived sitcom, My Mother the Car (1965), the misadventures of a man whose deceased mother Gladys (voiced by Ann Sothern) is reincarnated as a restored antique car. Although the series was a commercial failure, Van Dyke continued to work steadily in supporting television and film roles through the rest of the decade. He starred in another short-lived situation comedy, Accidental Family (1967), as widowed comedian Jerry Webster who buys a farm to raise his son while he is not away on professional tours.

He also was featured in the film Love and Kisses (1965) and as Andy Griffith’s co-star in Angel in My Pocket (1969).

During the 1970s, Van Dyke returned to stand-up comedy. He spent much of the decade touring Playboy Clubs around the country and headlining venues in Las Vegas and Reno, Nevada, Summerfest in Milwaukee, and in Atlantic City, New Jersey. He returned to television for guest appearances on Love, American Style and Fantasy Island. In 1973, he portrayed Wes Callison, News Writer, on the season four episode, “Son of ‘But Seriously, Folks'” on The Mary Tyler Moore Show. He also had roles in The Amazing Cosmic Awareness of Duffy Moon (1976) and 13 Queens Boulevard (1979).

In 1988, he made a guest appearance on Scott Baio’s sitcom Charles in Charge as Jamie Powell’s health teacher, Mr. Merkin. In 1989, Van Dyke began portraying Luther Van Dam, a beloved, yet befuddled assistant coach on the long-running series Coach. For this role, he received four consecutive Emmy Award nominations (1990 through 1993) for “Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series”.

In 1995, he appeared in a series of Hardee’s commercials to promote the Big Hardee, then in the late 1990s acted as the spokesperson for Big Lots. He appeared in the 2000s sitcom Yes, Dear as a recurring character, Big Jimmy, the father of Jimmy Hughes. He made a guest appearance on a September 2008 episode of My Name Is Earl and in 2010, he made an appearance on the second-season episode, “A Simple Christmas” of the television series, The Middle, playing Frankie’s father, Tag Spence. He returned in “Thanksgiving III” in November 2011, “Thanksgiving IV” in November 2012, “From Orson with Love” in May 2013, and “Thanksgiving V” in November 2013. Van Dyke also played the object of Maw Maw’s affections on the 18th episode of the first season of the series Raising Hope. In a December 2013 episode of The Millers he played Bud Miller, father to Margo Martindale’s character, Carol. In his final TV role in April 2015, he reprised his role as Frankie’s father on The Middle, guesting along with real-life brother Dick Van Dyke to play brothers.

Van Dyke was married twice and had three children with first wife Carol, daughters Jerri Lynn and Kelly Jean and son Ronald. Kelly Jean Van Dyke committed suicide in 1991, following struggles with substance abuse.

Jerry and wife Shirley resided together on their 800-acre ranch near Hot Springs, Arkansas.

Van Dyke was an avid poker player and announced a number of poker tournaments for ESPN in the late 1990s and early 2000s. He was also a 4-string banjo player with several performances on The Dick Van Dyke Show to his credit

Van Dyke died on January 5, 2018, at his Arkansas ranch, aged 86. He was in declining health since being involved in a car accident two years earlier.

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Brendan Byrne April 1, 1924 – January 4, 2018

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Brendan Thomas Byrne (April 1, 1924 – January 4, 2018) was an American politician and prosecutor from New Jersey.

A member of the Democratic Party, Byrne served for two terms as the 47th Governor of New Jersey from 1974 to 1982. Byrne started his career as a private attorney and had worked in the New Jersey state government beginning in 1955 before resuming his legal career after leaving office in 1982.

During his time in office as Governor of New Jersey, Byrne is noted for having overseen the opening of the first gambling casinos in Atlantic City and for having expanded theoceanside municipality’s economic base, establishing the New Jersey Department of the Public Advocate and for preserving a large majority of woodlands and wildlife areas in the state. He was also known as being “too ethical for mobsters” regarding his ethical code to deny bribes from mobsters in New Jersey during his tenure as Governor.

In 2011, Byrne was inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame for his services to the state during his governship.

Byrne was born and raised in West Orange, New Jersey. He was the fourth child among five children of ethnic Irish American Catholic parents, Francis A. Byrne (1886–1974), a local public safety commissioner and Genevieve Brennan Byrne (1888–1969).

In 1942, Byrne graduated from West Orange High School, where he had served as both the president of the debate club and senior class president. He briefly enrolled at Seton Hall University, only to leave in March the following year to join the U.S. Army. During World War II, Byrne served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, receiving the Distinguished Flying Cross and four Air Medals. By the time of his discharge from active service in 1945, he had achieved the rank of lieutenant.

After the war, Byrne attended Princeton University for two years, where he majored in Public and International Affairs. Due to the war, he spent only two years on campus, finishing his undergraduate thesis while enrolled at Harvard Law School. He graduated from Princeton in 1949, and went on to obtain his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1951.

Prior to entering public service, Byrne worked as a private attorney, first for the Newark law firm of John W. McGeehan, Jr., and later for the East Orange firm of Teltser and Greenberg.

In October 1955, Byrne was appointed an assistant counsel to Governor Robert B. Meyner. The following year he became the Governor’s acting executive secretary. In 1958, Byrne was appointed the deputy attorney general responsible for the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office. The following year, Governor Meyner appointed him as the Essex County Prosecutor. Governor Hughes reappointed Byrne to this same office in 1964 following the end of his first five-year term. From 1968 to 1970, Byrne served as the president of the Board of Public Utilities Commissioners.

In 1970, Byrne was appointed by Governor William T. Cahill to the Superior Court. He served as the assignment judge for Morris, Sussex, and Warren Counties starting in 1972. In April 1973, Byrne resigned from the Superior court to run for governor.

Byrne defeated Ann Klein and Ralph DeRose in the 1973 Democratic primary to win the party’s nomination for governor. In the November general election, Byrne won by beating the Republican nominee Congressman Charles Sandman in a landslide. Sandman had defeated the incumbent Governor Cahill in the primary. Byrne’s margin was so vast that it allowed Democrats to capture control of both chambers of the state legislature.

n January 15, 1974, Byrne was sworn in as the 47th governor of New Jersey.

Some of the policies enacted by the first Byrne administration include: the implementation of New Jersey’s first state income tax, the establishment of spending limits on local governments, county governments, school districts, and the state, the establishment of both the Department of the Public Advocate and the Department of Energy, and the implementation of public financing for future gubernatorial general elections. Although Byrne claimed during the 1973 campaign that a personal income tax would not be necessary for “the foreseeable future”, he eventually “muscled through” the unpopular income tax, New Jersey’s first, in 1976; it earned him the nickname “One-Term Byrne”

Byrne faced ten opponents in the 1977 Democratic primary, including future governor James Florio. However, Byrne obtained the party’s nomination, and went on to defeat his Republican opponent, State Senator Raymond Bateman, in the general election on November 8, 1977. This despite the fact that in early 1977, three-quarters of voters disapproved of his job performance and in polls taken in the summer, he trailed Bateman by 17 points.

Byrne and Bateman debated nine times and Byrne used the governorship to his advantage, signing bills and appearing with cabinet members all over the state, benefiting from a visit by President Carter and turning what was his biggest weakness, the income tax, into a strength. Property taxes went down because of it, people got rebates and Bateman’s plan—replacing it with an increased sales tax—was widely criticized.

During his second term, Byrne focused on policies such as: the passage of the Pinelands Protection Act, expansion of major highways, including the Atlantic City Expressway and Interstate 287, upgrades to sewage systems, further development of the Meadowlands Sports Complex, and casino-hotel development in Atlantic City. He is the most recent Democrat to be elected governor twice. The other Governors elected to two terms (Thomas Kean, Christie Whitman, and Chris Christie) have all been Republicans.

On June 27, 1953, he married Jean Featherly, with whom he had seven children. Jean and Brendan Byrne divorced in 1993 and soon afterwards Byrne married his second wife, Ruth Zinn, in 1994. Jean Byrne died in 2015 of babesiosis, aged 88.

Byrne died on January 4, 2018, at his home in Livingston, New Jersey, of a lung infection at the age of 93.

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“Rick” Hall January 31, 1932 – January 2, 2018

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Roe Erister “Rick” Hall (January 31, 1932 – January 2, 2018) was an American record producer, songwriter, music publisher, and musician best known as the owner and proprietor of FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. As the “Father of Muscle Shoals Music”, he was influential in recording and promoting both country and soul music, and in helping develop the careers of such musicians as Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Duane Allman and Etta James.

Hall was inducted into the Alabama Music Hall of Fame in 1985 and also received the John Herbert Orr Pioneer Award. In 2014, he won the Grammy Trustees Award in recognition of his lengthy career. Hall remained active in the music industry with FAME Studios, FAME Records, and FAME Publishing.

Hall was born into a family of sharecroppers in Forest Grove, Tishomingo County, Mississippi to Herman Hall, a sawmill worker and sharecropper and his wife, Dolly.

After his mother left home when young Hall was aged 4, he, along with his siblings was raised in rural poverty by his father and grandparents in Franklin County, Alabama. According to The Guardian, Dolly worked in a bordello after leaving the family. His father was a gospel music fan and his uncle gave Rick a mandolin at age 6. Later, he learned to play guitar.

He moved to Rockford, Illinois, as a teenager, working as an apprentice toolmaker, and began playing in local bar bands. When he was drafted for the Korean War, he declared himself a conscientious objector, joined the honor guard of the Fourth United States Army, and played in a band that also included Faron Young and the fiddler Gordon Terry.

When Hall returned to Alabama he resumed factory life, working for Reynolds Aluminum in Florence. When both his new bride Faye and his father died within a two-week period in 1957, he became lost in alcohol. He later began moving around the area playing guitar, mandolin, and fiddle with a local group, Carmol Taylor and the Country Pals and first met saxophonist Billy Sherrill. The group appeared on a weekly regional radio show at WERH in Hamilton. Subsequently, Hall formed a new R&B group, the Fairlanes, with the Billy Sherrill, fronted by the singer Dan Penn, with Hall playing bass. He also began writing songs at that time.

Hall left the Fairlanes to concentrate on becoming a songwriter and record producer. He had his first songwriting successes in the late 1950s, when George Jones recorded his song “Achin’, Breakin’ Heart”, Brenda Lee recorded “She’ll Never Know”, and Roy Orbison recorded “Sweet and Innocent”. In 1960, he started a company based in Florence, Alabama. He had met one of them, Billy Sherrill, the future producer of Tammy Wynette’s records, when they played together in a band called the Fairlanes. They named their company Fame (Florence Alabama Music Enterprises) and opened their first primitive studio above a drugstore.

Producer Sam Phillips, originally from Florence, Alabama, was an early mentor. During a 2015 interview with The New York Times, Hall recalled those early days. “We would sit up and talk until 2 o’clock in the morning and Sam would tell me, ‘Rick, don’t go to Nashville, because they’ll eat your soul alive.’ I wanted to be like Sam — I wanted to be somebody special.”

In 1959, Hall and Sherrill accepted an offer from Tom Stafford, the owner of a recording studio, to help set up a new music publishing company in the town of Florence, to be known as Florence Alabama Music Enterprises, or FAME.[11] However, in 1960, Sherrill and Stafford dissolved the partnership, leaving Hall with rights to the studio name.

Hall first success as a producer in a small studio was with one of his first recordings, Arthur Alexander’s “You Better Move On” in 1961. The commercial success of the record gave Hall the financial resources to establish a new, larger FAME recording studio on Avalon Avenue in Muscle Shoals. That song became the first gold record in the history of Muscle Shoals; at the time, Hall had licensed it to Dot Records. The song was recorded by others too, including the Rolling Stones in 1964. In that era, his musicians included Norbert Putnam, David Briggs, Peanut Montgomery and Jerry Carrigan.

Though Hall grew up in a culture dominated by country music, he had a love of R&B music and, in the highly segregated state of Alabama, regularly flaunted local policies and recorded many black musicians. Hall wrote: “Black music helped broaden my musical horizons and open my eyes and ears to the widespread appeal of the so-called ‘race’ music that later became known as ‘rhythm and blues”. Hall’s successes continued after the Atlanta-based agent Bill Lowery brought him acts to record, and the studio produced hits for Tommy Roe, Joe Tex, the Tams, and Jimmy Hughes. However, in 1964, Hall’s regular session group — David Briggs, Norbert Putnam, Jerry Carrigan, Earl “Peanut” Montgomery, and Donnie Fritts — became frustrated at being paid minimum union-scale wages by Hall, and left Muscle Shoals to set up a studio of their own in Nashville, Tennessee. Hall then assembled a new studio band, including Spooner Oldham, Jimmy Johnson, David Hood, and Roger Hawkins, and continued to produce hit records.

Hall’s FAME studio prospered. “By the mid-’60s it had become a hotbed for pop musicians of various stripes, including the Rolling Stones, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, Clarence Carter, Solomon Burke and Percy Sledge,” according to the Los Angeles Times. Singer Aretha Franklin credited Hall for the “turning point” in her career in the mid 1960s, taking her from a struggling artist to the “Queen of Soul”. According to Hall, one of the reasons for FAME’s success at a time of stiff competition from studios in other cities was that he overlooked the issue of race, a perspective he called “colorblind”. “It was a dangerous time, but the studio was a safe haven where blacks and whites could work together in musical harmony,” Hall wrote in his autobiography. Decades later, a publication in Malaysia referred to Hall as a “white fiddler who became an unlikely force in soul music”.

In 1966, he helped license Percy Sledge’s “When a Man Loves a Woman”, produced by Quin Ivy, to Atlantic Records, which then led to a regular arrangement under which Atlantic would send musicians to Hall’s Muscle Shoals studio to record. The studio produced further hit records for Wilson Pickett, James & Bobby Purify, Aretha Franklin, Clarence Carter, Otis Redding, and Arthur Conley, enhancing Hall’s reputation as a white Southern producer who could produce and engineer hits for black Southern soul singers. He produced many sessions using guitarist Duane Allman. He also produced recordings for other artists, including Etta James, whom he persuaded to record Clarence Carter’s song “Tell Mama”, However, his fiery temperament led to the end of the relationship with Atlantic after he got into a fistfight with Aretha Franklin’s husband, Ted White, in late 1967.

In 1969, FAME Records, with artists including Candi Staton, Clarence Carter and Arthur Conley, established a distribution deal with Capitol Records. Hall then turned his attention away from soul music towards mainstream pop, producing hits for the Osmonds, Paul Anka, Tom Jones, Marie Osmond and Donny Osmond. Also in 1969, another FAME Studio house band, Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, affectionately called The Swampers, consisting of Barry Beckett (keyboards), Roger Hawkins (drums), Jimmy Johnson (guitar), and David Hood (bass), left the FAME studio to found the competing Muscle Shoals Sound Studio at 3614 Jackson Highway in Sheffield, with start-up funding from Jerry Wexler. Subsequently, Hall hired the Fame Gang as the new studio band.

FAME Records was independent in 1962-1963. Hall signed a distribution deal with Vee-Jay from October 1963-June 1965. He moved his label to Atlantic distribution November 1965-September 1967. In May 1969 to May 1971, the label was distributed by Capitol, and finally, to United Artists from May 1972 until approximately April 1974.

The studio continued to do well through the 1970s and Hall was able to convince Capitol Records to distribute FAME recordings. In 1971, he was named Producer of the Year by Billboard magazine, a year after having been nominated for a Grammy Award in the same category. In the same year, Mac Davis recorded the first of his 12 albums at the FAME studio; four of the songs later received gold and platinum records.

Through the 1970s, Hall continued moving back towards country music, producing hits for Mac Davis, Bobbie Gentry, Jerry Reed, and the Gatlin Brothers. He also worked with the songwriter and producer Robert Byrne to help a local bar band, Shenandoah, top the national Hot Country Songs chart several times in the 1980s and 1990s. Hall’s publishing staff of in-house songwriters wrote some of the biggest country hits in those decades. His publishing catalog included “I Swear” written by Frank Myers and Gary Baker. In 1985 he was inducted into the Alabama Music Hall of Fame, his citation referring to him as the “Father of Muscle Shoals Music.”

In 2007, Hall reactivated the FAME Records label through a distribution deal with EMI.

Artists who recorded at FAME in subsequent years include Gregg Allman who recorded the Southern Blood LP, Drive-By Truckers, Jason Isbell, Tim McGraw with his hit I Like It, I Love It, the Dixie Chicks, George Strait, Martina McBride, Kenny Chesney and others.

He died on January 2, 2018, aged 85, at his home in Muscle Shoals, resulting from natural causes returning from a stay in a local nursing home shortly before Christmas.

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Mary Davis July 15, 1920 – January 2, 2018

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Mary Davis July 15, 1920 – January 2, 2018 – Mary K. Davis, 97, of Stuart, Florida passed away January 2nd, 2018 at Jupiter Medical Center
Mary was born on July 15th, 1920 to Glenn and Jessie (Shrive) Ketterman..

Born in Elkins, West Virginia she has resided in Stuart since 1994 coming from Miami, Florida.
Prior to retiring she had been an Evaluater at The Miami Property Appraiser’s office for many years.

She attended Covenant Fellowship Baptist Church, in Stuart.

Mary was preceded in death by her husband, George, daughter Phyllis Battle, and her two sister’s Glenadine and Joanne.

Surviving are her two brother’s Randall and Glenn Jr.
Also survived by her two grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

Friends may visit on Thursday, January 4th in the Chapel of Martin Funeral Home, Stuart from 10-11 AM With a chapel Service to begin at 11 AM.

She will be laid to rest next to her husband George at Fernhill Memorial Garden’s , Stuart

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Forest Hills Palm City Chapel & Forest Hills Memorial Park exists to help you deal with the death of a loved one. We believe every life, whether lived quietly or bigger than life itself, is unique and deserves to be honored. On our web site, you will find a listing of currently scheduled and recent services. We also offer information about who we are, how to find us and how to contact us. And for those who believe in planning ahead, there’s information about prearranging funeral, cremation and interment services. Contact us at: (772) 287-8484

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John Hicks March 21, 1951 – October 30, 2016

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John Charles Hicks Jr. (born March 21, 1951) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League. He is best remembered for being the last lineman to be runner-up in the vote for the Heisman Trophy.

In 1970, Hicks came onto the Buckeye scene and won the job as a starting tackle. He unfortunately missed his sophomore year due to a knee injury, but rebounded to put together two spectacular seasons in 1972 and 1973. During Hicks’ three years, Ohio State posted a 28-3-1 record, and each year, Ohio State won the Big Ten Championship and went to the Rose Bowl, making Hicks the first person from OSU to play in three Rose Bowls.

In 1972 Hicks was recognized as a First Team All-America selection and earned his first of two All-Big Ten honors. He repeated his All-Conference honors his senior year and again earned All-America honors, this time as a unanimous selection. His stellar senior season and dominance of the line of scrimmage caught the eye of the voters as Hicks won the Lombardi Award as the nation’s most outstanding lineman and the Outland Trophy as the nation’s best interior lineman.

The 6-3, 258 pound tackle started as a sophomore in 1970, freshman weren’t eligible, and helped them go to the Rose Bowl. In 1971, he started off the season in dominant fashion before injuring his knee and missing the last six games of the season. He came back to become an All-American in 1972 helping the Buckeyes to go back to the Rose Bowl. Then he had his monster 1973 season. A first round draft pick of the New York Giants, injuries would put a halt to his pro career.

Hicks was the first player to ever start in three Rose Bowls and was part of a monster Ohio State team. The unbeaten Buckeyes lost to Stanford 27-17 in the 1971 Rose Bowl. Next year at the 1973 game, Ohio State got steamrolled by USC 42-17. But the 1974 Rose Bowl game would be unbeaten Ohio State’s year to steamroll USC 42-21 as Hicks (Archie Griffin, Pete Johnson?) led the way to 323 rushing yards.

Hicks played for the New York Giants from 1974 through 1977. In April 1978, the Giants traded Hicks to the Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for offensive lineman Jim Clack and wide receiver Ernie Pough. Hicks never played for the Steelers.

Hicks is married to his wife Cindy, the father of three daughters and one son, and has three granddaughters and one grandson.

Out2martincounty.comCommentary by Richard Hall:

John Hicks was a friend and business associate and I was deeply saddened by the news of his passing.

I originally met John when he was still in school. A friend of mine was, at the time, dorm administrator of Stradley Hall (the athletic dorm).

I again had the privilege  of meeting John in 1975 when circumstances presented an opportunity to enter into a business enterprise with the newly crowned NFL “Rookie of the Year”. Our venture only lasted one year but what an interesting year it was.

John did the best imitation of Woody Hayes, whom he and many of the team affectionately called “the old man”, I have ever heard.

John Hicks wasn’t just among the greats ever to play football at Ohio State, he was “a giant,” two-time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin said. “In all that he did, he was a giant on and off the field.”

John passed away overnight due to complications from diabetes, his family acknowledged. He was 65.

“I knew this was coming, but it just hurts to know that he’s gone,” Griffin told The Columbus Dispatch.

A two-time All-American in 1972 and ’73, Hicks won both the Outland Trophy and the Lombardi Award in ’73 as the nation’s outstanding lineman. He also finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting that season, a monumental achievement for a right tackle.

He later was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, the Ohio State athletics hall of fame and the hall of fame for the Rose Bowl, in which he started for the Buckeyes in trips there after the 1970, ’72 and ’73 seasons. He was a first-round draft pick of the New York Giants in 1974 but injuries blunted his pro career.

“Everyone knows what he did on the field,” Griffin said. “But overall, he was just a terrific man. What he did off the field was also unbelievable.”

Along with founding and running his own real estate development company, Hicks was deeply involved in myriad organizations, including the Boys and Girls Club of Central Ohio and the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, and the Greater Columbus Sports Commission.

He also was known to never turn down a call from his former teammates and other Buckeyes, being given the nickname “The Godfather” by his fellow Ohio State alumni, and for all the right reasons, Griffin said.

“Anytime someone needed help they’d call John,” Griffin said.

Among the causes Hicks took up was that of former Buckeyes and NFL safety Jack Tatum, whose battle with the ravages of diabetes eventually led to his untimely death at 61 in 2010. Hicks arranged several fund-raising efforts to help defray the costs of Tatum’s plight.

“He’d be organizing folks to help, whoever it was that needed the help,” Griffin said, his voice cracking with emotion. “He was just unbelievable, man.”

Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith, a Cleveland native like Hicks, seconded that notion.

“I have known John since I was in high school in Cleveland; he was one of my idols,” said Smith, who went on to play football at Notre Dame in the mid-1970s. “His impact on our community cannot be measured. He was a man’s man.”

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Raymond C. Smith January 5, 1922 – June 6, 2010

 

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STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Raymond C. Smith, 88, of Cape Canaveral, Fla., a World War II veteran who enjoyed traveling, died June 6 in the Cape Canaveral home of his daughter, Lynne Smith Danesh.

Born on Staten Island, Mr. Smith graduated from Port Richmond High School. He began a 36-year career at Procter & Gamble, which was interrupted when he served in the U.S. Army, stationed in Mississippi during the second World War. He enrolled in the Army’s pre-medical program at the University of Mississippi but his studies ended when the war did.

When Mr. Smith returned to Staten Island, he resumed working at Duncan Heins Division of Procter & Gamble in Port Ivory, Staten Island while taking night classes at Wagner College, Grymes Hill, where he earned a bachelor of science degree in 1955 and a master of business administration degree in 1964. Proud of his alma mater, he continued to support the school until his death.

After retiring in 1976 as a manager, Mr. Smith and his wife of 56 years, the former Rita Quinn, traveled to south Florida and lived aboard their yacht, Gingham, until finally settling in Satellite Beach, Fla., amid a group of Staten Island retirees.

Mr. and Mrs. Smith traveled the world, be it by land, air, or sea. After his wife’s death in 1998, Mr. Smith fulfilled their dream to pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

An Episcopalian, Mr. Smith was a member of St. Andrew’s Parish, Richmond; St. John’s Episcopal Church, Melbourne, Fla., and St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Cocoa, Fla.

In addition to his daughter, Lynne, Mr. Smith is survived by another daughter, Patricia A. Korol; four grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Funeral arrangements were handled by Brownlie-Maxwell Funeral Home, Melbourne. There will be a mass at 11 a.m. on July 17 in St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Cocoa.

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Richard Shaw Hall Sr. Decorated Naval Aviator

Dies at 86 in Palm City

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Richard (Dick Hall) Hall founder of Libre House Publishing of Princeton, New Jersey and Chem-Pro Marketing of Staten Island, New York died September 28, 2007 after a brief illness in Palm City, Florida.

He is survived by his two sons Richard S. Hall, Jr. and daughter in-law Robin Hall of Palm City, Florida and Gregory H. Hall and daughter in-law Debbie Hall of Staten Island. He was also survived by three grand children Dana Carole Hall Reese of Los Angeles, Richard S. Hall III of Palm City and Andrew S. Hall also of Palm City. Mr. Hall had two great grand children Charles and Smyth Reese of Los Angeles. He also was survived by 2 siblings, older brother Norman Hall (91)of Whiting, New Jersey and younger sister Doris Zdanowicz of New Jersey as well.

He was married to Alice M. Baker for 60 years also of Staten Island.

Noted “Who’s Who” business and finance entrepreneur was probably best know for his “Cost estimation” articles in McGraw Hill’s publication Chemical Engineering. He led the way to computerized cost estimation in the stainless steel industry.

From modest means in his early years it might be said that he was a product of the depression and World War II. Born on Staten Island, New York on April 21, 1921 he attended Public School #30 in The Westerleigh area of the island. He graduated from port Richmond High School in 1939 and proceeded to go to work in Manhattan for the U.S. Nickel Company. Later in 1941 he worked at The Bethlehem Ship yard where he worked as an electricians apprentice on ships including the Destroyer Juno.

He enlisted as a Naval Aviation Cadet in April 1942, shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He was first assigned to The Naval Civil Pilot Training Program at Syracuse University from June to October 1942; United States Naval Preflight School at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C., from January to March 1943; United States Naval Air Training Center, Glenview, Illinois, from March – July 1943; United States Naval Air Training Center, Corpus Christi, Texas, July 1943 – February 1944; graduated and commissioned Ensign U.S.N.R. (Naval Aviator) on February 9, 1944.

Assigned U.S. Naval Operational Training Center, Banana River, Florida from February -April 1944; assigned to Navy Squadron VPB26, Charleston, S.C. to Fleet Air Wing 17, serving with the fleet in the central and western Pacific theaters. Awarded Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medals for “Meritorious Service” in China, Korean and Japanese mainland theaters of operation. He was promoted to Lt. (JG) in April 1945. Was a member of the first Naval Aviation Squadron to land in the Tokyo Bay area simultaneous with the fleet’s arrival in September, 1945. He served several weeks with the occupation forces in Japan.

Reassigned to Naval Air Station, Kaneohe, Hawaii. Ordered to Fleet Headquarters, New York via NAS Alameda, California for release from active duty on January 6, 1946.

Mr. Hall attended Wagner College, Staten Island, New York from 1946 to 1948. He then went to work as a sales representative for New York Refrigeration Co., Long Island, N.Y., 1947. Sales Representative for Doyle & Roth Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, NY from 1947 to 1954; Advertising Sales Manager, 1954 – 1963; Vice President 1963 – 1970. Vice President of Walster Corp. Simpson, Pa. 1962 – 1970; Chem-Pro Marketing Services, Staten Island, N.Y., 1966 – 1970; Vice President, Chem-Pro Associates, 1970; President, Richard S. Hall & Associates Ltd., Staten Island, NY from 1970 – 1987.

For 20 years he was a Biographee of Who’s Who in the East, Who’s Who In Finance and Industry, and the International Biographee.

He served on American Standards Association committee establishing “Standards for Tubular Heat Exchangers for the chemical industry”, a collaborative effort between the American, and the Tubular Exchanger Manufactures Association.

Retiring in 1987 he joined and actively participated in the Services Corps of Retired Executive, co-chairing-in a collaborative effort with the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce–a series of seminars on international trade.

He was a member of the Chemists Club, American Association of Cost Engineers, Association of Naval aviation, Service Core of Retired Executives, The Planetary Society, National Space Society, and International Trade Advocacy Group.

After the death of his loving wife in 2003 and in ill health, he moved to Palm City, Florida to live with is son Richard and his family.

In his later years he was active with The Martin County Council On Aging, The V.I.P. (Visually Impaired Persons), The Palm City Art Associates.

Mr. and Mrs. Hall will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. The family has expressed that in lue of flowers please make a donations to Hospice of The Treasure Coast.

Forest Hills Palm City Chapel & Forest Hills Memorial Park exists to help you deal with the death of a loved one. We believe every life, whether lived quietly or bigger than life itself, is unique and deserves to be honored. On our web site, you will find a listing of currently scheduled and recent services. We also offer information about who we are, how to find us and how to contact us. And for those who believe in planning ahead, there’s information about prearranging funeral, cremation and interment services.

Contact us at: (772) 287-8484

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