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OUT2NEWS PET OF THE WEEK!!

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“Sam”

Do you want YOUR pet to be Out2News Pet of the Week?

Send us your Photos with name of your pet to rhallout2news@gmail.com

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OUT2NEWS AUGUST BARK BYTE

Back to School Tips for Your Pet

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Article by: Robin Hall – Out2News

Ready or not, back-to-school is just around the corner! It’s always an exciting, busy and somewhat stressful time for everyone – including the family pet.

Pets thrive on predictability, and the sudden shift in your daily routine can be unsettling. Help ease them into the school year by slowly making some adjustments now.

For a week or two leading up to the first day of school, plan some activities away from home to get your dog used to you being away.

If your pet’s meal times have changed over the summer, go ahead and start getting them back on their school year schedule.

For indoor dogs that will be spending several hours alone, a dog crate may be your best bet. A crate is not a punishment device; it is a play pen. Placing your dog in a crate should be thought of as putting a toddler in a play pen or crib.

Whenever your dog is left alone, the sound of human voices or music can be soothing. I recommend leaving slow (50 to 60 beats per minute) and soothing music playing whenever your pet is left alone.

For dogs, gradually change their walking and exercise times to correspond to what it will be during the fall. For cats, establish regular playtimes that will be easy to continue after school starts.

During the summer, bedtimes can be irregular for the whole family. Begin sending everyone – including your pup – to bed at what will be their normally scheduled time.

Of course, treating your dog and cat to some cool back-to-school products and gadgets couldn’t hurt. your dog may not get as much time playing with your family as during the care-free days of summer. If this is the case at your house, be sure to make the most of the time you have with your pet. Long walks at the park, lounging around on the couch, whatever it takes to re-connect at the end of a busy week. Remember that even though your dog wasn’t at work or school all day, he still needs time to unwind. As the days grow shorter, be sure to find time to walk your dog daily and enjoy this unique relationship.

Your pet is part of your family, and you want him to enjoy the peace and quiet of staying home alone. When you consider your dog’s needs and plan for them, you’ll all have a successful school year.

Remind the kids that their furry friends could be feeling a little lonely during this time. “A little extra pat, praise and attention can go a long way until everyone adjusts back into the weekly grind.

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Martin Downs Animal Hospital

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Paradise Pooch Pet Services

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Lisa takes good care of me at Paradise Pooch!

Paradise Pooch does lots of things, she does dog grooming,walking and pet sitting,equine care and she is licensed and insured.

Some of the added conveniences of mobile grooming over a traditional salon include:

You avoid taking time from your busy schedule to drop off and pick up your pet(s)…We come to You!
Your pet avoids the stress of traveling in the car and being left in a strange environment.
You and your pet receive the full one-on-one attention from a professional pet stylist.
Your pet is never confined in a cage or kennel.

Book your pet for a holiday pampering with Lisa at Paradise Pooch – 508-237-1601.

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CFF Partners with PetSmart to Increase Adoptions

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Article by: Shannon Borrego

Finding homes for stray cats is an ongoing effort, and rescue organizations are always looking for ways to showcase their adoptable felines. Thank goodness for PetSmart! Caring Fields Felines has been adopting kittens and cats at the PetSmart store in Jensen beach for over 10 years.

What began as an agreement to feature a few cats at the store every Saturday has evolved into a partnership in which select cats and kittens remain at the store seven days a week. This arrangement has helped CFF place hundreds of cats and kittens in loving homes!

In addition to manning the adoption booth at the store every Saturday, CFF volunteers spend a lot of time caring for the cats. Volunteer coordinator, Lori Hendricks, explained that there are 14 shifts throughout the week during which volunteers feed, clean, and play with the cats to ensure that they are well looked after. Adoptions aren’t limited to the regular Saturday hours of noon to 4:00 p.m.; interested adopters can reach CFF personnel from info included on a card posted for each cat. From there, arrangements can be made to meet the cat and complete the adoption process.

Liz Villasurda shares why she enjoys volunteering at PetSmart as follows:

“Sometimes I see the whole process from when a little kitten comes in full of dirt and fleas, gets spayed or neutered and ready for their trip to PS. The best part is seeing the excited potential adopter’s face when they choose their pet. For some kittens/cats, it’s a long journey from an unhealthy environment, to CFF and finally finding their home.”

PetSmart volunteers Donna Loew and Barbara Greiner added that they enjoy the opportunity to chat with people about Caring Fields Felines. Although we’ve been in operation since 2000 (formerly as Hobe Sound Animal Protection League), there are still a lot of people who aren’t familiar with our no-kill 501(c)(3) feline rescue organization. PetSmart gives us the chance to spread the word!

Anthea Collier, another frequent volunteer at PetSmart, finds satisfaction through knowing that she’s doing something positive for the cats in a world where we often feel we “don’t make a difference.” And, one thing is for sure—CFF’s presence at PetSmart is definitely making a difference!

www.cffelines.org.

 

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HSTC Pets of the Week

 

Deidre Huffman -Adoption Manager-Humane Society of the Treasure Coast – 4100 SW Leighton Farm Ave – Palm City, FL 34990

772-600-3204   dhuffman@hstc1.org

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HSTC Pets of the Week

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Ophelia

Ophelia is a very sweet 7 year old beauty available here at the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast. She was recently in a foster home for about 1 month for TLC. The foster had some wonderful things to say about her. She was in a home with three dogs and three cats; she never hissed or had any issues with them. She would probably be happiest in a quieter home with less going on. She loves to be brushed and will talk to you first thing in the morning when it is time to get her breakfast and insulin. Ophelia is diabetic and does have to have insulin twice a day. She does not mind it at all and really doesn’t react to getting the injection. She uses the litterbox like a champ, but it does have to be cleaned out more frequently since she does potty more than other cats. She loves to be held and loves to be around people. Please give this sweet, sweet girl a chance at a forever home. She truly deserves it!

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Brownie

Hello! My name is Brownie and I am a 6 year old Netherlands Dwarf Rabbit. I am very cute and very small! However, I am a very delicate elder bun and I am looking for a home with no children under the age of 13 years old. I also have an old eye injury that has cause some discoloration and caused me to be partially blind in that eye. I can see some light in the eye, but not much. Otherwise, I am a happy healthy neutered bun ready for a fur-ever home! Are you the quiet home for me to live out my golden years?

View me and all my bunny friends staying at the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast at hstc1.org.

 

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Luna

Luna is the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast’s current youngest longest resident; she has been in our care since early April and is only 2 years old! She adores her blue plushy toy, gets along very well with children, and may already be housetrained. Luna does want to be the only fur-baby in the home.

Thanks to a donor we were able to run a Wisdom Panel DNA test on her. It came back that she is primarily an American Staffordshire Terrier with a little bit of miscellaneous breeds.

Need another reason to adopt Luna? Her adoption fee has been sponsored! Come meet this cutie today.

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Magic Gets a Second Chance

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Article by Shannon Borrego

Melanie Blank never turns her back on any animal needing help. One lucky cat in South Florida owes his life to Melanie’s recent compassionate efforts. Several months ago, as Melanie left the gym she was greeted by the sight of a terribly undernourished and miserable-looking cat cowering in the bushes. She walked right back into the gym and asked if there was a humane trap on hand that she might borrow. Miraculously, there was. However, her repeated attempts to trap the frightened cat were unsuccessful, and she decided to return the next morning with another trapper, Christina. The two planned to rendezvous back at the gym at 6:00 a.m.

When Melanie arrived the next morning, she was surprised to find that Christina had already managed to trap the cat. They took him straight to the vet, but the news was discouraging. The cat was covered with lice and had tested positively for the FIV virus. The vet recommended euthanizing him. Melanie refused; she felt there had to be a better solution.

The cat was given the name Magic and Melanie headed to a different veterinarian. Here it was discovered he also had a type of tapeworm that is especially harmful. The vet treated the cat for tapeworm and agreed to keep Magic temporarily. In the meantime, Melanie began her search for a place that would take in an FIV-positive cat.

Although her efforts were met with criticism by some, Melanie refused to become discouraged. She felt Magic deserved the best help she could provide. Through a friend she learned of Caring Fields Felines. But, when she called, Melanie was regretfully informed the sanctuary was full. “Call back in a week. We’ll do our best to make room,” she was told.

One week later, the news was good. CFF had found space for Magic! Melanie almost burst into tears with relief.

Nowadays, Melanie drives almost daily from her home in Palm Beach Gardens to the sanctuary in Palm City to visit Magic. His improvement has been remarkable. As Melanie notes, Magic may live a few weeks, months, or years; but whatever the outcome, she feels her efforts have been worthwhile.

Melanie has this to say about CFF: “I don’t for one minute regret saving him or what has been done for him. Caring Fields is like a piece of heaven where they truly care about the cats.” 772-463-7386.

www.cffelines.org

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Caring Fields Felines Enhances Sanctuary

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Article by Shannon Borrego

Caring Fields has always been a very cool place, but it’s about to get even cooler! The installation of a wonderful new central air conditioning system in the sanctuary’s cattery is currently underway! The system will provide a welcome respite from in the sweltering Florida heat that both cats and humans have suffered through in past years. Now, the cool air will not only benefit those who live, work and volunteer at the sanctuary, but it’s hoped the cool quarters will offer an incentive to attract new volunteers. When many of our workers head north for the summer, CFF is left with a shortage of help that lasts until fall. New helpers are needed!

Another enhancement that’s coming soon is additional electrical power for a memorial fountain to be erected in the pond. The fountain, donated by Steve Cargill in memory of his mother, will be both aesthetically pleasing and provide aeration for the pond and its resident fish.

Our wish list is gradually getting whittled down, thanks to our generous donors; however, two major items remain on the list. The first, with a price tag of $4,200, is a docking station for our two golf carts. The carts are in use all day, every day to ferry supplies, cats and people around the 5-acre property. Also on our list is a set of new front doors for the cattery. Pauline Glover, our Executive Director, dreams of sturdy wooden doors with glass panes that feature an etching of our logo. The doors run $8,600.00.

The coolest news of all involves CFF’s work to help homeless cats in Okeechobee over the past couple of months. Animal Control in Okeechobee has been inundated with kittens! With the help of the Pegasus Foundation, CFF has been working with officers to get these cats spayed and neutered, and find them homes. In the past few months, CFF has taken in over 100 kittens from Okeechobee! 30 cats have been in foster care, but the rest have been housed at the sanctuary. As you can imagine, we have reached our limit until these kittens all find homes. Fortunately, during the month of May, 31 kittens were adopted, and so far in June, CFF has found loving homes for 46 kittens. Please give us a call if you’re interested in fostering, adopting or volunteering. (772-463-7386). All cat lovers are welcome!

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WHAT IS A PET TRUST?

Out2News.comA pet trust is an arrangement to provide for the care and financial support of your pet(s) upon your disability or death. You fund the trust with property or cash that can be used to provide for your pet based on your instructions in the trust document.

Your pet trust should name a trustee who will carry out your instructions for the care of your pet, including handling and disbursement of trust funds and turning your pet over to the person or entity you designate to serve as your pet’s caregiver. The trustee and caregiver could be the same person or entity.

As with most trusts, you can create your pet trust while you’re alive (an inter vivos or living trust) or at your death through your will (a testamentary trust). In either case, you can generally change the terms of your pet trust at any time during your lifetime to accommodate changing circumstances. If you create an inter vivos trust, you can fund it with cash or property either during your life (needed if the trust is to care for your pet if you become incapacitated) or at your death through your will. A testamentary trust is only funded after you die.

Some of the instructions to consider for your pet trust include: provisions for food and diet, daily routines, toys, medical care and grooming, how the trustee or caregiver is to document expenditures for reimbursement, whether the trust will insure the caregiver for any injuries or claims caused by your pet, and the disposition of your pet’s remains.

You may also want to name a person or organization to take your pet should your trust run out of funds. Also consider naming a remainder beneficiary to receive any funds or property remaining in the trust after your pet dies.

A potential problem arises if your pet is expected to live for more than 21 years after your death. That’s because, in many states, the “rule against perpetuities” forbids a trust from lasting beyond a certain period of time, usually 21 years after the death of an identified person. However, almost every state has laws relating to pet trusts that address this issue in particular and allow for the continued maintenance of the trust, even if its terms would otherwise violate the rule.

Note that there are costs and expenses associated with the creation of a trust.

If you’re looking for an advisor who can assist you in this time of change, give me a call.

Steven W Landwersiek is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC

6530 S. Kanner Hwy | Stuart, FL, 34997-6396

Office: 772.233.4315 | Fax: 772.233.4316

steve@laaipg.com / Steven.landwersiek@lpl.com

http://www.laaipg.com/

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Christmas in July at Humane Society Thrift Stores

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PHOTO CAPTION (from left): Humane Society volunteers Colin Fogarty, Laura Fogarty, Helga Iley, Sue Caballero, Pat Kilmer and Wynne DesRuisseaux are getting ready for Christmas in July.
STUART, Fla. — Some of the best Christmas deals can be had in July at the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast’s two thrift stores. Starting July 5, shoppers can take advantage of “Christmas in July,” an annual event that features great savings on Christmas décor and related items. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week at Central Thrift Store, 2585 SE. Federal Highway, and North Thrift Store 1099 NW 21st Street. Both shops are in Stuart.

The Christmas-themed event will continue until the entire holiday inventory is gone, which is usually by the end of the month.

“We have beautiful Christmas ornaments by Christopher Radko and lights, as well as trees and more,” said Thrift Store Senior Manager Kim McFadden.

For more information, call McFadden at (772) 286-6909 or visit the website, http://www.hstc1.org.

About the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast – Since 1955, the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast, 4100 SW Leighton Farm Ave. in Palm City, has been the leading advocate for homeless, abused and abandoned animals in Martin County. The HSTC provides the Treasure Coast’s most progressive spay-neuter and adoption programs and dynamic humane education services. The HSTC has long had partnerships with like-minded organizations. The HSTC does not euthanize to make space at its shelter, there are no time limits on how long animals stay in its care, and no companion animal is turned away for any reason. For more information, visit http://www.hstc1.org or call (772) 223-8822.

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OUT2NEWS JUNE BARK BYTE

Helping Your Dog Beat the Heat This Summer

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Article by: Robin Hall – Out2News

It’s here – summertime! And this year it’s not just summertime – it’s SUMMERTIME! With a vengeance!

Sydney recently posted the highest temperature ever recorded in the city’s history, a wilting 45.8 degrees. And the average temperature for all of Australia recently hit 40.33 degrees – the hottest day recorded in more than a century. In other words, it’s HOT!

Most everyone knows that hot weather can be dangerous. Heat stroke and hyperthermia claim human victims every summer. And the hotter the temperatures, of course, the greater the risks.

So take care to keep your cool this summer. But also remember to take care of your pets, because the heat can be fatal for them as well. According to Dr. Steven Ferguson of the Australian Veterinary Association, “Pets are just as susceptible to heat-related illness as humans.”

So while you’re surviving this sizzling summer, make sure that your pets are surviving as well.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO KEEP YOU PET COOL

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10 tips from the AVA for keeping your pet safe and comfy through this scorching summertime season:

Keep plenty of water available for your pet at all times. Make sure the water is cool and fresh, and keep it in the shade.

Put out multiple bowls of water on really hot days. Use bowls that can’t be tipped, and place them in a shady and (relatively!) cool spot.

Older pets are even more susceptible to the heat, so keep a special eye on them. Watch for indications that they are having trouble breathing.

Dogs tend to enjoy sitting in the sun. But lots of time spent in the sun can cause heat stroke and increase the risk of skin cancers. So be sure to provide a shady area for your dog at all times.

Help your dog cool off with a kid’s paddling pool. Put just a couple of inches of water in it, and place it in a shady location.

Add a few cubes of ice to your pets’ water bowls. They’ll enjoy it, and it will help to keep their body temperature down;

If your pets can’t be in an air-conditioned area, consider placing a fan where it will blow on them.

Exercise your pets only in the early morning or late evening. Avoid the hottest part of the day.

Freeze some treats and give them to your pets. It will keep them busy for a while and help cool them down.

Some longhaired dogs will benefit from a trim. Check with your vet.

DANGER SIGNS

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Keep an eye on your pets during particularly hot spells; watch for indications that they are having difficulty with the heat.

Dogs. Signs that your dog is in distress due to heat include vomiting or drooling, fatigue, heavy panting or obvious difficulty breathing, diarrhea, or seizures.

Check the dog’s rectal temperature every 10 minutes and continue the treatment until the temperature falls below 39 degrees.

If the dog’s temperature is below 40 degrees, moving the dog into a cooler environment may be sufficient.

If the dog’s temperature is higher that 40:

Spray the dog with water, or immerse in cool (not cold) water.

You can also apply cool packs to the groin area, and wipe its paws with cool water.

Even if you believe your pet has suffered from only a mild case of heat stroke, and you feel you’ve treated it successfully, you should still get your pet to a vet. Heat stroke can potentially cause serious internal problems that may not become obvious for some time, possibly even until days after the event.

STAY COOL

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Summer is the time for lots of fun activities, but it’s also a time of potential danger, for both you and your pets. So take care of yourself, take care of your pets, stay cool – and have fun!

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Guests at CFF Kitten Shower Enjoy Purrrfect Afternoon!

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Article by Shannon Borrego

Just about everyone who attended Caring Fields Felines’ Kitten Shower came away smiling! Close to 400 guests showed up to admire the kittens and share an appreciation for our feline friends.

Every year the shower seems to bring out the best in human nature; this year the positive vibes were almost palpable. Guests streamed into the sanctuary, bearing gifts for the cats—everything from monetary donations to super-sized bags of cat food and litter. One cat lover even donated a beautiful basket, featuring “flowers” made of cleverly folded twenty and ten-dollar bills!

When they weren’t oohing and aahing over the kittens, children were kept busy painting and hiding decorative rocks, sampling a cookie, or two, or three, and accompanying their parents on tours of the sanctuary. Jack Blankenship supplied live background music, Subway and Starbucks donated food and drink, and Magnolia Cakes donated a mind-boggling cake depicting a stack of books and frolicking kittens. Not only was the cake beautiful, but quite tasty, too! Author, Sunny Walker, sold and signed
copies of her book, “FOREVER HOMES: True Stories of Animals Rescued in South Florida,” donating a portion of the proceeds to CFF.

Since this was a baby shower, the main focus of the party was, naturally, the kittens! CFF is thrilled to report that every single kitten available for adoption found a home, as did two adult cats! If you’re in the market for a kitten, don’t worry; there are several pregnant cats at the sanctuary, and some awaiting neuter or spay surgery, so it won’t be long before there are more kittens ready for adoption.

At the conclusion of the shower, the staff and volunteers took a look at the huge pile of items donated, and jars stuffed with money, and everyone gasped. Close to $15,000 was raised in monetary gifts and
hundreds of dollars-worth of supplies were donated. Prior to the shower, Anita Schaal, director of the D’Agostino Foundation, donated $6,000 for the building of walkways throughout the grounds, and the walkways were ready just in time for the party! This outpouring of generosity on the part of all our friends exceeded our wildest expectations and is deeply appreciated. These gifts will help see CFF through the long, lean summer. Thank you, friends, for making the Kitten Shower an outstanding success!

To see photos from the event, please visit us on Facebook or check out
our website: www.cffelines.org.

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Paradise Pooch Pet Services Opens New Location In Stuart

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Stuart — Your pooch will be the talk of the dog park. At Paradise Pooch Lisa knows that your pets are special member of the family and your best friends. Your pet will be pampered and treated with love and care.

Paradise Pooch brings professional state of the art grooming services to your home. This is a mobile pet grooming salon and pet care company. Lisa comes with a lifetime of experience raising her own pets as well as caring for others.

Paradise Pooch mobile grooming van is climate controled for your pets comfort at all times.The van is fully equipped with a full size tub and hydrolic table. We will accommodate your schedule and come to your home or your office.

Going away or just taking a day trip? Our pet sitting and dog walking services are customized to meet your pets needs. We make visits to your home and take care of all your pets needs while you are away.

Meet Lisa on her website at paradisepoochpetservices.com or FaceBook page for more details.

Out2martincounty.com is a photo journal featuring people, “Who they are, what they do and where they do it”.

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If Your Dog Could Talk, He’d Say “Don’t Pet Me Here”

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Article By Dr. Becker

There’s been a great deal of scientific research in recent years into the ways in which dogs benefit people. And the science confirms what pet guardians have always known — our animal companions have a powerful positive impact on our emotional and physical well-being.

Owners who are closely bonded to their dogs spend a lot of time being affectionate with their pet because it feels good. As it turns out, there’s a good reason for those good feelings.
Feel-Good Hormones Overflow in Closely Bonded Dogs and Humans

In a Swedish study, researchers found that owners who kissed their dogs frequently had higher levels of oxytocin than other owners. And along with kissing, there were two other very important factors that contributed to elevated levels of oxytocin:1

The owners perceived their relationship with their dog to be pleasurable rather than difficult or a chore
They offered fewer treats to their pet, preferring to offer attention and affection instead

In another study, dog guardians were put in a sparsely furnished room and asked to sit on a rug on the floor with their pets.2

For a half hour, the owners were instructed to focus all their attention on their dogs — talk softly to them, stroke, scratch and pet them. The owners’ blood was drawn at the beginning and again at the end of the 30-minute session.

The researchers found that the dog owners’ blood pressure decreased, and they showed elevated levels not only of oxytocin, but also several other hormones, including:

Beta-endorphins, which are associated with both pain relief and euphoria
Prolactin, which promotes bonding between parent and child
Phenylethylamine, which is increased in people involved in romantic relationships
Dopamine, which heightens feelings of pleasure

And believe it or not, all the same hormones were also elevated in the dogs, which suggests the feelings of attachment are mutual!

Based on all the happy hormones surging through the dogs, it’s clear the owners in the second study knew how to touch their pets in a way that maximized their pleasure and contentment. However, that’s not always the case.
Have You Ever Wondered How Petting Feels to Your Dog?

Dog-to-dog interaction involves lots of physical contact. They do it to show affection and a desire for play, but they also make contact when trying to goad or threaten another dog.

This is why some forms of human petting elicit pleasure and a sense of calm in dogs, while other types of touching can send the wrong message.

Unless you’re carefully observing her as you pet her, it’s easy to inadvertently trigger negative emotions in your dog. Different types of petting, for example, a scratch behind the dog’s ear or a pat on the head, feel pretty much the same to us. The dog, however, isn’t necessarily having the same experience.

Recently, a team of researchers set out to evaluate the physiological and behavioral responses in dogs to determine which types of petting felt good to them, and which didn’t.3
How the Study Was Conducted

The study involved 28 privately owned dogs of different breeds, ages, and backgrounds. Some dogs were obedience trained; others were not.

Each dog was fitted with a heart rate monitor and brought into a room where both the owner and a stranger were present. The owner was instructed to ignore what was going on while the stranger interacted with the dog, touching him or her in nine different ways for 30 seconds at a time.

The nine different touches included:

Petting the shoulder
Petting the lateral side of the chest
Petting the ventral part of the neck
Petting and holding the lying dog on the ground
Holding a forepaw
Petting on the top of the head
Scratching at the base of the tail
Holding the collar
Covering the muzzle with one hand

What the Strokes Evoked

When the dogs were petted on the head or paw, they showed appeasement signals and redirected behaviors. The researchers interpreted those reactions as signs the dogs were uncomfortable. It’s worth noting that appeasement signals aren’t always indicators of stress. According to Whole Dog Journal:

“They are important everyday communication tools for keeping peace in social hierarchies, and are often presented in calm, stress-free interactions. They are offered in a social interaction to promote the tranquility of the group and the safety of the group’s members.

When offered in conjunction with other behaviors, they can be an indicator of stress as well.”4

When the dogs were constrained by being held while lying on the ground, held by the collar, or having their muzzle covered, unsurprisingly, they showed freezing and displacement behaviors. These included lifting a paw, looking or moving away, and lip licking. All the dogs also had elevated heart rates — a clear sign of stress.

When the interactions were over, the dogs immediately shook their bodies and stretched, which are signs of relief and further proof they did not enjoy being constrained, no matter how gentle the touch. The touches the dogs liked best? Having their chests and shoulders petted, and getting a nice scratch at the end of the spine just in front of the tail.
Dog Petting Tips

It’s important to note the dogs in the study were being handled by strangers. Most dogs tolerate a lot more from their immediate human family members, including touching that is decidedly unnatural for canines, such as hugging and kissing.

However, it’s not uncommon for dog guardians to miss their own dogs’ stress signals, which can include a quick head turn or lick of the upper lip, as well as freezing in place. It can be easy to miss or misinterpret some of the more subtle canine expressions of distress.

Unfortunately, the result can be a difficult relationship between human and dog that in a worst-case scenario can even become dangerous. Suggestions for enhancing your relationship with your dog through touch:

Let your dog initiate contact most of the time, rather than invading his personal space. Some dogs need a little time to settle themselves before getting physically close enough to be touched.
Pet your dog gently on the chest or behind the ear closest to you (to avoid reaching over her head for the other ear). Always avoid petting that involves reaching over or across your dog.
As a general rule, it’s never a good idea to hug a dog. Some dogs tolerate it, but it’s a form of constraint, which feels threatening to them.
Stop petting your dog after a short time and see if she asks for more, or seems relieved and/or moves away.
Watch for stress signals, including looking away, lip licking, yawning, ears back, “whale eye” (the white of the eye is showing at the corners and/or rim), lifting a paw, tail tucking, freezing, or urination. If your dog is doing one or more of these things, stop touching him and give him some space.
Always ask the dog’s human before interacting with a pet you don’t know.

In all interactions with our animal companions, we should pay attention to the impact we’re having on them. Each dog is an individual, and while one dog may love a vigorous rubdown, another may be completely stressed out by that type of handling.

Additionally, there are some dogs that have anxiety and fear being approached by strangers, in general. There’s an organization trying to promote the identification of these dogs from a distance by using a yellow ribbon on a leash, through The Yellow Dog Project, which I wholeheartedly endorse.

By observing your dog’s reaction to physical contact and following his lead, you can enhance your bond with him and forge a more positive relationship.

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Easy Homemade Raw Dog Food

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Peanut Butter and Banana Frozen Dog Treats

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Cats Have Been Popular White House Pets

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Article by Shannon Borrego
As President Trump settles into the White House, a family pet isn’t part of the new household. However, many of our past Presidents have owned cats and dogs during their terms in office. Cats have been especially popular.

The first White House cat, Tabby, belonged to Abraham Lincoln. Tabby not only lived in the White House, he reportedly participated in White House dinners where he was fed with a gold fork! Lincoln was a devoted cat lover. On one occasion, upon finding three half-frozen kittens in a shed, he tucked them into his jacket and took them home. He cared for them until they were adopted by friends.

President Rutherford Hayes was the first president to own a Siamese cat. In fact, his cat was documented as the first Siamese to enter the United States. The cat, Siam, was a gift from the American Consul in Bangkok, Thailand. To reach the U.S., the poor cat endured a two-month voyage in a crate! After joining the family, she was permitted to roam the White House, and, according to legend, she loved to make “grand entrances” when guests were being entertained.

Another cat lover, Theodore Roosevelt, had two cats, a polydactyl named Slippers, and a cat named Tom Quartz. Slippers often fell asleep sprawled out in hallways. At one state banquet, guests were compelled to step around the snoozing feline as they entered the dining room.

White House cats have behaved much the same as cats living in ordinary surroundings. Woodrow Wilson’s two cats, Mittens and Puffins, were known to try leap onto the dining room table during meals, only to be squirted with water as a deterrent.

President Calvin Coolidge was particularly fond of cats. As a young boy, he rescued a litter of kittens from being drowned, and he owned several cats during his stint in the White House. When one of the cats disappeared, Coolidge issued a desperate plea for his return via a radio address. Happily, the cat was found and returned.

More recently, cats have resided in the White House alongside Presidents Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush. Time will tell whether President Trump will join them in bringing a pet to the White House. (Information gathered from “our Capital’s Finest Felines—A Look back at Presidential Cats,” The Purrington Post, and “Famous White House President Cats,” LoveMeow.com)

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Out2News 2017  Past Pets of the Week!!!!!!!

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In Memorial Pets

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Their friendship was special—a bond worth honoring and sharing with those who understand.

If you would like to post a pet memorial, please send all pictures to: rshall@out2news.com/martincounty. 

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All Pets Go To Heaven

Out2NewsArticle by: Robin Hall – Out2News/Out2martincounty.com

There is a very special place where beloved pets go after they die. This is only a temporary location. But there are trees and grass and lakes, and everything they love. Here they can play and eat and sleep, even better than they did, before they died. Now, there are no aches or worries or dangers of any kind to trouble or threaten them. The only joy missing is their beloved human companion, you.

All health is restored completely, and all injuries are healed. Dogs and cats play with each other like youngsters, and they do not have time to feel lonely for you. They miss you, and with the special wisdom that animals have, they trust that this condition will get better. And they confidently wait as they frolic.

A wonderful day will come for each of them, when in the middle of playing they will suddenly feel something is different. And all their senses will be at the height of excitement and exuberance. They will sniff the air and look off in the distance where they recognize that dearly loved special presence. Then they will call out in elation, and with eyes shining and tail going wild, tear off at a full gallop, almost flying over the green grass.

The bond that we form with animals can be very deep and fulfilling, and the loss of a beloved animal can have an impact on us that is as great, or even greater, than the loss of a family member or friend. This bond is what makes our interactions with animals rich and rewarding, but also what makes the grief process so complicated. The grief can seem to come in waves, may be brought on more intensely by a sight or sound that sparks your memory, and may seem overwhelming at times.

After your pet has died or been lost, it is natural and normal to feel grief and sorrow. The amount of time a person grieves for the loss of their pet may be very different for different people. Although grief is an internal and private response, there are certain stages of grief that most people experience, and not everyone experiences them all or in the same order.Anger and guilt often follow denial.

Your anger may be directed toward people you normally love and respect, including your family, friends or your veterinarian. People coping with death will often say things that they do not really mean, unintentionally hurting those whom they do not mean to hurt.

Depression is a common experience after the death of a special pet. The tears flow, there are knots in your stomach, and you feel drained of all your energy. Day-to-day tasks can seem impossible to perform and you may feel is isolated and alone. Many depressed people will avoid the company of friends and family.

You will come to terms with your feelings. You begin to accept your pet’s death. Resolution has occurred when you can remember your pet and your time with them without feeling the intense grief and emotional pain you previously felt. Acceptance and resolution are normal and do not mean that you no longer feel a sense of loss, just that you have come to terms with the fact that your pet has died. Everyone experiences the stages of grief, grieving is always a very personal process. Allow yourself time to grieve and heal, and be thankful that your life was made that much better by sharing it with your beloved pet.

Memorializing a pet can be a healthy part of the grieving process. A framed photo or a photo album can help remind a pet parent of their pet. Some people keep the ashes of their pets and bury them in a spot favored by their pet. Creating a journal that includes stories about the things your dog did will help you focus on the good times you spent together.   Photographs record those special moments and lock them forever in time. Have a professional portrait painted as a memorial to your dog companion. If you enjoy gardening, plant a tree, perennial, bush or shrub in memory of your dog. Donate to an animal organization in your dog’s name.  Some pet lovers place a brick or stone with their pet’s name painted on it in their gardens or they buy specially designed and inscribed grave markers if their pet is buried on their property.

Realizing that a seemingly trifle, yet possibly most-significant part of pet ownership is doing the right thing for our pets at the end of their lives. Sometimes the hardest things to do are the best things we can do. Loving animals teaches us something about ourselves and so does letting them go…

Out2 Bark Byte is dedicated to Robin Hall’s – Owner of Out2News best friend “Teddy”. RIP 8/4/2015

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